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Mistaken Identity

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September 10, 1998
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
In its opening last weekend at Bowie Playhouse, 2nd Star's production of Ray Cooney's "Funny Money" had audiences in stitches - as this farcical show has done since its 1994 London premiere. Cooney has written 22 plays over the past 50 years, perfecting a formula that usually includes a middle-class businessman falling into an improbable situation surrounded by characters who become entangled in increasingly confusing events - often involving a series of mistaken identities. Many of these hallmarks are present in "Funny Money," in which accountant Henry Perkins picks up the wrong briefcase on the train and discovers a huge amount of money inside instead of his gloves and scarf.
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NEWS
January 31, 1992
A case of mistaken identity caused an Edgewater man some pain Wednesday morning when a man knocked on his door and began punching him, county police said.Police said that at about 7 a.m., a man knocked on the door of a home in the 1700 block of Quantico Road. When the 44-year-old victim opened the door, the assailant began punching him inthe face.Suddenly, the assailant stopped and said: "I've got a problem. I got the wrong guy."He then left the house.Police described the assailant as a white man, about 25 years old, 5 feet 11 inches tallabout 195 pounds.
EXPLORE
November 3, 2011
The Carroll County Sheriff's Office said Wednesday that an earlier report of a "suspicious person" who tried to get a 14-year-old male student to get in his vehicle in the Lineboro-Manchester area was most likely a case of mistaken identity. On Nov. 2, at about 3:30 p.m., Carroll County Sheriff's Deputies were called to the 4700 block of Schalk Road No. 1 for the report of suspicious activity. Deputies determined that, moments prior, a 14-year-old male was exiting a school bus when he was approached by a man in a pickup truck.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | December 3, 1992
An attorney for a 33-year-old man accused of raping an Ellicott City woman almost two years ago portrayed his client as a victim of mistaken identity as his trial opened yesterday.Michael Devon Armstead, a former railroad worker, is on trial in Howard County Circuit Court on charges of first-degree rape, first-degree sex offense, burglary and robbery in the Jan. 29, 1991, attack of a Waverly Woods Drive resident.If convicted, he could receive a maximum life sentence. He is currently serving five life sentences for rapes in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff Writer | January 10, 1993
Frank Gray wants the police department to do something about his ransacked Glen Burnie storage locker, his destroyed possessions.Instead, he says, department officials have refused to pay for damages caused by officers who mistakenly raided his cubicle at Storage Express in a drug sweep last October that resulted in the county's largest marijuana seizure."
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 22, 1994
MIAMI -- The two young men believed that the truth would somehow set them free.The young waitress says she is certain of the truth; they attacked and stabbed another man in a parking-lot mugging.A Broward County judge was surprised by what a jury believed was the truth -- but must follow their verdict and punish the men for a crime they say they didn't commit.This much is certain: Leonard Williams and Marvin Shaw are soft-spoken, churchgoing men with solid backgrounds and little history of trouble.
NEWS
September 29, 1998
A Mount Airy man arrested Friday on a fugitive warrant from Virginia waived extradition yesterday in Carroll County District Court, saying he has never been there and wants to clear his name.Steven A. Richardson, 24, of the 1300 block of Ellis Road, told Judge JoAnn M. Ellinghaus-Jones that he lost his wallet about two years ago. He believes someone found it and misused its contents, which included Motor Vehicle Administration photo identification and a Social Security card.Melissa O. Hockensmith, assistant state's attorney for Carroll County, said the charges were unclear but apparently involved robbery and escape.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 14, 1996
Don't look now, but fairies have been spotted on the north shore of the Severn River.Or, you could look closely and see they have been joined by nobles, star-crossed lovers, all manner of supernatural forest creatures and a hilarious thespian with a wondrous propensity for making a fool of himself.Of course, it's William Shakespeare's most colorful and delightful comedy, "A Midsummer Night's Dream" I'm referring to.And it will be presented by the Other Little Theatre at the Annapolis Naval Station Theater, 89 Bennion Road, at 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays this week through May 4. A matinee will be given at 2 p.m. April 28.Paul Hussar plays the role of Oberon, ruler of the fairy kingdom.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1996
A Westminster man who spent more than a month in jail, charged with selling cocaine on two occasions to an undercover police officer in 1995, was acquitted yesterday in an unusual case of mistaken identity.Carroll County Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. said he had "no doubt whatsoever" that Wayne A. Safrit, 46, of the 800 block of Fairfield Ave. was innocent.Sobbing with joy and receiving hugs from family and friends in the courtroom, Safrit said, "Now I can get on with the rest of my life."
EXPLORE
dmbrown@comcast.net | October 5, 2011
"Hello. It's so good to see you again. I met you a couple of weeks ago at the museum," the nice lady said to me. "I'm so glad you could come to this. " "This" was the sendoff for the president of the Friends of Trees in Portland, Ore. I was videotaping a play involving some friends who were popping out like gnomes and fairies in the forest in the upper northwest part of the city. I was also on jet lag. "No," I said to her. "I just arrived in Portland yesterday. " "Oh, yes," she insisted, "it was you I met at the museum.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 9, 2008
Ronald Jackson's bedroom holds the signs of a young, earnest life cut short too soon in Baltimore. An unboxed computer sits at the foot of his bed - part of a school project. A news article about a slain middle-school classmate is taped on one wall; a memorial T-shirt of his grandmother hangs on another. There's a television and Sony PlayStation, which he enjoyed playing with friends. A couple of small bags of chips and cookies still lie next to his pillow - junk food he had planned to eat before bedtime Sunday.
NEWS
June 20, 2008
WARD BOSTON, 84 Probed Liberty attack Ward Boston, a former Navy attorney who helped investigate the 1967 Israeli attack on the USS Liberty that killed 34 crewmen and years later said President Lyndon B. Johnson ordered that the assault be ruled an accident, has died. Mr. Boston, a retired Navy captain from Coronado, Calif., died June 12 of complications from pneumonia at a San Diego-area hospital, said his wife, Emma Boston. Mr. Boston was assigned as a legal adviser to a military board of inquiry investigating the attack on the Liberty, an electronic-intelligence-gathering ship that was cruising international waters off the Egyptian coast on June 8, 1967.
NEWS
By CAROL MIGHTON HADDIX | January 11, 2006
Kumquats are not mini oranges, though you may think so when you see those cute little guys in produce markets. They actually have their own genus, Fortunella, and are not a member of the citrus genus, according to Elizabeth Schneider in Uncommon Fruits & Vegetables: A Commonsense Guide. "It is the only fruit with a rind that is deliciously sweet and pulp that is puckery-sour!" she wrote. For those reasons, the fruit can be eaten whole, though the overall taste can be sour. The Kumquat Growers Association says that kumquats taste better if they are gently rolled between the fingers before being eaten to release essential oils in the rinds.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Alec MacGillis and Ryan Davis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2005
Police charged an Annapolis man with murder yesterday after two men were shot, one fatally, early in the morning outside a well-known Fells Point strip club. The shooting - which police think was sparked by a case of mistaken identity - occurred about 1:10 a.m. yesterday in the doorway of Ritz Cabaret, 504 S. Broadway, during a confrontation between a group of five men leaving the club and a group of three men entering it. Police said someone - they didn't say in which group - thought he recognized an acquaintance in the other group and shouted the nickname of the man he thought he had seen.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 7, 2004
WASHINGTON - Seven people, including an Air Force sergeant and a retired minister, sued the government yesterday, saying that they had been wrongly placed on "no-fly" lists and subjected to humiliating interrogation and intrusive searches at airports. The class action suit, filed in Seattle by the American Civil Liberties Union, seeks to force the federal Transportation Security Administration to develop an effective grievance system for people mistakenly singled out in anti-terrorism screenings.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2003
Two years after a correctional officer was killed in an isolated area of Dorchester County, state police said yesterday they believe the shooting of Officer Gregory G. Collins might have been a case of mistaken identity. Collins, 31, of Vienna, was on his way home from the Eastern Correctional Institution when he was killed by someone who fired into his silver gray pickup truck early in the morning of June 4, 2001. Investigators say that another man, Gary N. Camper, 48, of Vienna, was driving a similar truck on Route 331 when several shots were fired into his vehicle six days before Collins was killed.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 20, 2004
COLUMBUS, Ohio - The tale was already hard enough to believe. A Las Vegas man in a hotel casino offers a slice of pepperoni pizza to a guy sitting at another table, recognizes him from newspaper photos as the man wanted in two dozen shootings in Ohio, sets out alone on the Vegas Strip to search for the fugitive, and 12 hours later finds the suspect's car and leads police to their man. Now the story of how Charles A. McCoy Jr. was captured has taken a...
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2003
A federal judge in Baltimore ruled yesterday that a $10 million excessive-force claim can go forward against an FBI agent who shot an unarmed Pasadena man in the face after mistaking him for a bank robber. It was a key hurdle in the closely watched case involving Special Agent Christopher R. Braga, who shot Joseph C. Schultz with an M-4 rifle during a botched arrest March 1 last year. In a 24-page opinion, U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz ruled that there was not enough evidence to dismiss Schultz's claim.
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