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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 19, 2003
WASHINGTON - In a blow to Missouri River commercial interests, a federal appellate court turned down yesterday the Army Corps of Engineers' request to delay lowering water levels in the river while it appeals another court's injunction. The corps, meanwhile, continued to defy the injunction, issued by a federal judge in Washington a week ago, ordering less water in the lower reaches of the Missouri to protect endangered species. Corps spokesman Blain Rethmeier said his agency planned to stick to its guns and operate the dammed river under terms of an earlier court injunction in Nebraska stipulating higher flows for barge navigation.
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NEWS
Clarksville21029@yahoo.com 301-854-3624 | September 10, 2013
Breakfast is coming to town. The traditional 5th District Volunteer Fire Department's country breakfasts will be back on the community calendar starting Sept. 15 from 8 a.m. to noon in the Ten Oaks Ballroom at 5000 Signal Bell Lane near the intersection of Routes 32 and 108. The menu includes pancakes, eggs, sausage, bacon, scrapple, apple sauce, gravy and biscuits, breakfast beverages and more. The cost is $9 for adults, $8 for seniors 55+, $5 for children ages 5-10 and free for children under 5. The volunteers appreciate your support and look forward to seeing you Sept.
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FEATURES
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,Staff Writer | August 30, 1992
There were two goals. One was, well, to borrow from the psychobabble of the '80s and '90s, bonding: a 50-year-old father and a 24-year-old son from the city taking a three-day, two-night canoe journey on the Missouri River in Montana. It would be my territory -- I'd grown up beside the Missouri in the capital city of Helena -- and my son's expertise -- he of numerous sailing and canoeing trips on the Chesapeake and Susquehanna and a sailboat journey from New England to the Bahamas. I would be the host; the child would be father (and camp counselor)
NEWS
September 5, 2012
Your editorial "We built that" (Sept. 3), while recognizing the important role of the federal government in large infrastructure projects such as New Orleans' levee system, left readers with the mistaken impression that Hurricane Katrina scored a direct hit on New Orleans and its surrounding metropolitan area in 2005. Hurricane Katrina's landfall was on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, about 90 miles east of New Orleans. Our city and its area got the greatest impact from Hurricane Katrina's winds and storm surge, which overpowered the poorly-designed and built (with federal funding)
NEWS
By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 28, 2004
The Army Corps of Engineers yesterday proposed a new plan to manage the Missouri River, sparking howls of protest and immediate threats of lawsuits up and down America's longest waterway. Despite numerous recommendations calling for an overhaul, the long-awaited Corps proposal - 15 years in the making - leaves the distribution of the giant river's flows largely unchanged. Critics charged that politics trumped science in the proposal. "I am disappointed that the best the Corps can come up with is a document that provides little more than the status quo ... [and that]
NEWS
By ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH | February 6, 2005
WASHINGTON - States along the Missouri River are suffering their worst drought in decades and pressing the Army Corps of Engineers to hold more river water in Montana and the Dakotas this year and restrict flows downstream. At a summit meeting in South Dakota tomorrow, Western governors hope to win backing for a plan that they say could prevent "draconian" measures a year from now, including closing the Missouri to barge navigation. But the upstream quest for water will prove difficult, given the long-running war over the increasingly scarce river water used by Missourians for drinking, power production and barge navigation.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 14, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Army Corps of Engineers is proposing a new Missouri River management plan that it says will protect wildlife without controversial changes in the river's flow. Under court order to lower water this summer for endangered species, the corps has drafted a long-term plan that relies on restoring wildlife habitat by means other than sharp fluctuations in the river's depth. Among the proposals: Widening the river wherever possible. Reconnecting the river with its floodplain.
NEWS
By Kansas City Star | August 2, 1993
LEXINGTON, Mo. -- Expectant mothers Cindy Taber and Heather Thompson each chanced a 15-minute boat ride over flooded farm fields instead of a two-hour ambulance trip to a hospital. Mothers and babies are fine.Ms. Taber lives outside Richmond, north of the Missouri River. Her doctor, William Hamilton, practices in Lexington, south of the river.Normally, the trip takes a few minutes. But because of flooding detours, it now takes up to two hours.Ms. Taber's contractions began July 25 as she prepared for church.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2000
This is the third in a series of reports from locations named Baltimore. It's hiding. Amid the 1,100 acres of oak, hickory and black walnut trees and warm-season grasses and wild turkeys and rabbits, rabbits, rabbits, the Baltimore Bend of the Missouri River cannot be reached by foot from this spot. When one finds the "Baltimore Bend Conservation Area," a state forest 55 miles east of Kansas City, Mo., one can expect to see the bend named Baltimore. But there is no marked trail, just a cheap rut. Thirteen ticks embedded in legs and thighs are the price of admission, and the wild turkey that just exploded from these warm-season grasses almost killed a man five minutes ago. Died of city fright, just about.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 24, 2002
PIERRE, S.D. - Bruce Peterson's Lighthouse Pointe resort on clear-blue Lake Oahe is caught in the middle of a major water war for control of the Missouri River - and he's losing the battle 1 foot at a time. Not only is he coping with a yearlong drought, but the Army Corps of Engineers regularly draws water from the lake, formed by a dam on the once-meandering river, to create higher water levels more than 1,000 miles downstream for barge traffic, farm irrigation and power generation. The lake has been going down between 6 inches and 1 foot weekly since late spring, said Peterson, who worries that continued drops in water levels could force him to close his sailboat marina.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 15, 2012
The Potomac River, which flows between Maryland and Virginia, was named the nation's "most endangered" waterway today by a Washington-based environmental group. American Rivers put the Potomac atop its annual list of endangered rivers.  Though cleaner than it used to be, the "nation's river," so named because it flows through Washington, D.C., still faces threats from urban and agricultural pollution, the group says, and from cutbacks being pushed in Congress of federal environmental regulations.
NEWS
By ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH | February 6, 2005
WASHINGTON - States along the Missouri River are suffering their worst drought in decades and pressing the Army Corps of Engineers to hold more river water in Montana and the Dakotas this year and restrict flows downstream. At a summit meeting in South Dakota tomorrow, Western governors hope to win backing for a plan that they say could prevent "draconian" measures a year from now, including closing the Missouri to barge navigation. But the upstream quest for water will prove difficult, given the long-running war over the increasingly scarce river water used by Missourians for drinking, power production and barge navigation.
NEWS
By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 28, 2004
The Army Corps of Engineers yesterday proposed a new plan to manage the Missouri River, sparking howls of protest and immediate threats of lawsuits up and down America's longest waterway. Despite numerous recommendations calling for an overhaul, the long-awaited Corps proposal - 15 years in the making - leaves the distribution of the giant river's flows largely unchanged. Critics charged that politics trumped science in the proposal. "I am disappointed that the best the Corps can come up with is a document that provides little more than the status quo ... [and that]
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 14, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Army Corps of Engineers is proposing a new Missouri River management plan that it says will protect wildlife without controversial changes in the river's flow. Under court order to lower water this summer for endangered species, the corps has drafted a long-term plan that relies on restoring wildlife habitat by means other than sharp fluctuations in the river's depth. Among the proposals: Widening the river wherever possible. Reconnecting the river with its floodplain.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 19, 2003
WASHINGTON - In a blow to Missouri River commercial interests, a federal appellate court turned down yesterday the Army Corps of Engineers' request to delay lowering water levels in the river while it appeals another court's injunction. The corps, meanwhile, continued to defy the injunction, issued by a federal judge in Washington a week ago, ordering less water in the lower reaches of the Missouri to protect endangered species. Corps spokesman Blain Rethmeier said his agency planned to stick to its guns and operate the dammed river under terms of an earlier court injunction in Nebraska stipulating higher flows for barge navigation.
NEWS
By Tim Jones and Tim Jones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 13, 2003
ST. LOUIS - The man under the Lewis and Clark Bridge looked suspicious to Lt. Fred Stipkovits, who quickly cut the speed of the small Coast Guard inflatable and turned upriver. "You see that guy?" he asked, stopping to take a closer look. "Yeah," said Chief Petty Officer Philip Pashia, standing in the bow with binoculars to get a fix on the man. Moments later, the two Coast Guardsmen, who were on routine anti-terrorism patrol on the Mississippi River, discovered that the man they were watching was an inspector with the Missouri Transportation Department, and he was just doing his job. Like a police officer walking the neighborhood beat, Stipkovits turned the orange boat down the serpentine Mississippi and headed toward St. Louis, looking for signs of trouble amid bridges, locks, 1,200-foot barges, power plants, refineries, municipal water intakes, riverboat casinos, pleasure boaters and the ubiquitous fishermen.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | May 30, 1995
GRAFTON, Ill. -- Muriel Schreiber, owner of Muriel's Cafe, can continue to offer dining with a temporary river view. The floodwaters across the street aren't getting any closer.For several days, a second round of serious flooding seemed imminent in Big River country, especially here at the confluence of the Mississippi and Illinois rivers, about 15 miles north of St. Louis.Then yesterday, the National Weather Service scaled back its projections for river crestings.That means more homes and businesses along Main Street in Grafton, already hard-hit this year, should not get submerged.
NEWS
September 5, 2012
Your editorial "We built that" (Sept. 3), while recognizing the important role of the federal government in large infrastructure projects such as New Orleans' levee system, left readers with the mistaken impression that Hurricane Katrina scored a direct hit on New Orleans and its surrounding metropolitan area in 2005. Hurricane Katrina's landfall was on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, about 90 miles east of New Orleans. Our city and its area got the greatest impact from Hurricane Katrina's winds and storm surge, which overpowered the poorly-designed and built (with federal funding)
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 24, 2002
PIERRE, S.D. - Bruce Peterson's Lighthouse Pointe resort on clear-blue Lake Oahe is caught in the middle of a major water war for control of the Missouri River - and he's losing the battle 1 foot at a time. Not only is he coping with a yearlong drought, but the Army Corps of Engineers regularly draws water from the lake, formed by a dam on the once-meandering river, to create higher water levels more than 1,000 miles downstream for barge traffic, farm irrigation and power generation. The lake has been going down between 6 inches and 1 foot weekly since late spring, said Peterson, who worries that continued drops in water levels could force him to close his sailboat marina.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2002
GLASGOW, Mo. - For years, people in this quiet one-motel town on the banks of the Missouri River believed that they had a small claim to a big piece of history - explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark had camped here on their quest to the West. A plaque put up in the 1960s declared it so, and, as former Mayor Earl Stockhorst put it, a "big stack of journals" had confirmed it. Firm in their conviction, town officials planned a $22,000 celebration to mark the famous three-year expedition's bicentennial from next year to 2006.
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