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TRAVEL
April 1, 2001
A MEMORABLE PLACE Rejuvenation in Montana By Michael Coursey SPECIAL TO THE SUN As I sat in Caras Park on the banks of the Clark Fork River, in the smoky twilight of Missoula, Mont., I remembered my hesitation in coming here last summer, not knowing how it might affect my life. I came to study photography at the Rocky Mountain School of Photography, and I went home to Baltimore with much more than images on film. I was in mid-life, starting over in a field I knew little about: art. The experience of living and studying in Missoula was like no other.
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SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
When Keron DeShields committed to Montana in 2011, his goal was to get as far away from Baltimore as possible . But after three years of being 2,300 miles away, the former Pallotti and Towson Catholic guard said he's looking forward to closing out his college career at Tennessee State in Nashville, where he'll be able to make a much shorter trip home. “It took me from Montana probably all day on the plane just to get home,” said DeShields, who signed with the Tigers earlier this month.
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NEWS
By Kathleen Clary Miller | May 12, 2008
HUSON, Mont. - When my husband and I retired and moved from Southern California to the Missoula, Mont., area, we imagined a quiet existence in a corner of the country that doesn't make national news. The local paper covers stories about whether to allow Hooters to build on a busy street corner, the reconstruction of a dam that threatens trout fishing season, and who can shoot wild turkeys on whose property. Ahh, the simple life, out of the media glare! But suddenly Missoula is a regular in the national headlines.
NEWS
By Kathleen Clary Miller | May 12, 2008
HUSON, Mont. - When my husband and I retired and moved from Southern California to the Missoula, Mont., area, we imagined a quiet existence in a corner of the country that doesn't make national news. The local paper covers stories about whether to allow Hooters to build on a busy street corner, the reconstruction of a dam that threatens trout fishing season, and who can shoot wild turkeys on whose property. Ahh, the simple life, out of the media glare! But suddenly Missoula is a regular in the national headlines.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | August 2, 1993
Measured by the standards of big-time metropolitan America, the university and regional trade center of Missoula, Montana (population 43,000), doesn't even make the charts.But Daniel Kemmis, Missoula's imaginative mayor, insists Missoula is in many respects as much a ''citistate'' as the regions encompassing Denver or Pittsburgh, Stuttgart or Lyon.On a map, Mr. Kemmis has drawn lines plotting Missoula's everyday geographic reach -- newspaper circulation and television market, bank depositors, retailing draw, medical services.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 19, 1996
MISSOULA, Mont. -- It started when Chuck Kaparich, the cabinetmaker, dragged a wooden horse into the mayor's office.There were four others back at the shop, and now Kaparich had only one question: If he built a carousel -- a glittering, organ-thumping carousel -- would the city accept it?Daniel Kemmis remembers looking at the woodcarver and feeling -- how to put the best face on it? -- annoyed.He wondered how he was going to get Kaparich, no less the horse, out of his office."Sit down and tell me about yourself," he said instead.
TOPIC
By Carol Susan Woodruff | March 11, 2001
MISSOULA, Mont. - A blizzard nearly blinds me as I scan the hill just north of downtown. Then, squinting hard, I catch sight of it: the huge, crudely painted peace sign that for 15 years has comforted and inspired me, filled me with nostalgia and defined this town I call home. I'm trying to fix the sign in my memory. By spring, the sign will be gone, a quirky footnote in the history of this quirky little town nestled in the northern Rockies. The sign adorns a 40-square- foot microwave reflector owned by Qwest Communications.
NEWS
By CAROL SUSAN WOODRUFF | March 23, 1997
MISSOULA, Montana - Elsewhere in the country, basketball fans are easing into their La-Z-Boys, clicking on their big-screen TVs and reveling in March Madness. But out here in Big Sky Country, an altogether different sort of March Madness consumes us.Throughout much of Montana, we remain locked in the jaws of the worst winter on record, and it's only starting to show signs of breaking. Revel is the furthest thing from our minds.The nation's attention understandably has been riveted on states such as Ohio, Kentucky and Arkansas, where floods and twisters have wreaked havoc.
NEWS
August 8, 2003
James Welch, 62, whose novels about Native American life brought him international acclaim, died of a heart attack Monday at his home in Missoula, Mont. He had been ill with lung cancer since October. The Montana-born American Indian author of seven books burst onto the literary scene in 1974 with the publication of his first novel, Winter in the Blood. Narrated by a young Indian who lives on a ranch on a reservation in north-central Montana, the book garnered a front-page review in The New York Times Book Review by novelist Reynolds Price, who called it a "nearly flawless novel about human life."
SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
When Keron DeShields committed to Montana in 2011, his goal was to get as far away from Baltimore as possible . But after three years of being 2,300 miles away, the former Pallotti and Towson Catholic guard said he's looking forward to closing out his college career at Tennessee State in Nashville, where he'll be able to make a much shorter trip home. “It took me from Montana probably all day on the plane just to get home,” said DeShields, who signed with the Tigers earlier this month.
NEWS
August 8, 2003
James Welch, 62, whose novels about Native American life brought him international acclaim, died of a heart attack Monday at his home in Missoula, Mont. He had been ill with lung cancer since October. The Montana-born American Indian author of seven books burst onto the literary scene in 1974 with the publication of his first novel, Winter in the Blood. Narrated by a young Indian who lives on a ranch on a reservation in north-central Montana, the book garnered a front-page review in The New York Times Book Review by novelist Reynolds Price, who called it a "nearly flawless novel about human life."
TRAVEL
April 1, 2001
A MEMORABLE PLACE Rejuvenation in Montana By Michael Coursey SPECIAL TO THE SUN As I sat in Caras Park on the banks of the Clark Fork River, in the smoky twilight of Missoula, Mont., I remembered my hesitation in coming here last summer, not knowing how it might affect my life. I came to study photography at the Rocky Mountain School of Photography, and I went home to Baltimore with much more than images on film. I was in mid-life, starting over in a field I knew little about: art. The experience of living and studying in Missoula was like no other.
TOPIC
By Carol Susan Woodruff | March 11, 2001
MISSOULA, Mont. - A blizzard nearly blinds me as I scan the hill just north of downtown. Then, squinting hard, I catch sight of it: the huge, crudely painted peace sign that for 15 years has comforted and inspired me, filled me with nostalgia and defined this town I call home. I'm trying to fix the sign in my memory. By spring, the sign will be gone, a quirky footnote in the history of this quirky little town nestled in the northern Rockies. The sign adorns a 40-square- foot microwave reflector owned by Qwest Communications.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Special to the Sun | January 7, 2001
Holiday cheer and conviviality have come to a merciful close. Now it's just winter -- no tinsel, no lights, nothing but cold outside. This is a time to savor the sedentary delights of reading -- garden catalogs to nurture spring dreams, cookbooks to map out hearty winter cuisine and compelling fiction to make short work of a dreary evening or weekend. Assume that avid gardeners and serious cooks can navigate their own passages. Skip ahead to the really fun stuff -- the winter crop of thrillers and mysteries.
NEWS
By CAROL SUSAN WOODRUFF | March 23, 1997
MISSOULA, Montana - Elsewhere in the country, basketball fans are easing into their La-Z-Boys, clicking on their big-screen TVs and reveling in March Madness. But out here in Big Sky Country, an altogether different sort of March Madness consumes us.Throughout much of Montana, we remain locked in the jaws of the worst winter on record, and it's only starting to show signs of breaking. Revel is the furthest thing from our minds.The nation's attention understandably has been riveted on states such as Ohio, Kentucky and Arkansas, where floods and twisters have wreaked havoc.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 19, 1996
MISSOULA, Mont. -- It started when Chuck Kaparich, the cabinetmaker, dragged a wooden horse into the mayor's office.There were four others back at the shop, and now Kaparich had only one question: If he built a carousel -- a glittering, organ-thumping carousel -- would the city accept it?Daniel Kemmis remembers looking at the woodcarver and feeling -- how to put the best face on it? -- annoyed.He wondered how he was going to get Kaparich, no less the horse, out of his office."Sit down and tell me about yourself," he said instead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Special to the Sun | January 7, 2001
Holiday cheer and conviviality have come to a merciful close. Now it's just winter -- no tinsel, no lights, nothing but cold outside. This is a time to savor the sedentary delights of reading -- garden catalogs to nurture spring dreams, cookbooks to map out hearty winter cuisine and compelling fiction to make short work of a dreary evening or weekend. Assume that avid gardeners and serious cooks can navigate their own passages. Skip ahead to the really fun stuff -- the winter crop of thrillers and mysteries.
NEWS
December 14, 2003
County teachers receive national certification Two Carroll County teachers have received certification from the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS). Maria Garlitz teaches reading and language arts at North Carroll Middle School. She has been a teacher for nine years and has degrees in English and elementary education from Loyola College of Maryland. Thom McHugh, an English teacher at Century High School, has taught for 14 years. He has a bachelor's degree in English and education from the University of Maryland, College Park and a master's degree in English from the University of Montana, Missoula.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | August 2, 1993
Measured by the standards of big-time metropolitan America, the university and regional trade center of Missoula, Montana (population 43,000), doesn't even make the charts.But Daniel Kemmis, Missoula's imaginative mayor, insists Missoula is in many respects as much a ''citistate'' as the regions encompassing Denver or Pittsburgh, Stuttgart or Lyon.On a map, Mr. Kemmis has drawn lines plotting Missoula's everyday geographic reach -- newspaper circulation and television market, bank depositors, retailing draw, medical services.
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