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By N.Y. Times News Service | March 6, 1991
MILAN, Italy -- The neat nosegays, rather than elaborate flowering plants, that accompanied invitations to the fall and winter ready-to-wear shows here this week were a sign of the times: Ostentation is out. Extravagant nightly entertainment is a thing of the past, and the clothes, designed under the shadow of war, are more soothing than shocking. Hemlines are coming down, albeit gradually, a sobering fact in itself.Ottavio and Rosita Missoni, the knitwear specialists who were among the designers who successfully campaigned 15 years ago for this city to become a fashion center, introduced their collection in their showroom, bypassing the mammoth fair where most shows take place.
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By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2011
You came, you saw, you bought everything. Now how do you incorporate those Missoni pieces into your existing home décor? The Missoni Collection crashed Target's website in a matter of seconds. Within 20 minutes of stores opening, the women's wear line was almost completely sold out. Soon customers were lined up at the check-out aisles, their carts overflowing with merchandise baring the Italian designer's unmistakable zigzag pattern. They came, they saw, they bought everything.
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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2000
As co-founder of the American Dime Museum, home to a two-headed calf and other freaks of nature, Dick Horne prefers a "professorial" image, "not seedy, but borderline," he explains. Horne's wife, WBJC on-air personality and Baltimore Symphony chorus member Dyana Neal, prefers an "artsy but sophisticated look." Recently, the couple held forth at the opening of a new Dime Museum wing, featuring an exhibit called, "Midway in Miniature." They looked grand; he in his dark hues, she in leather slacks and a cashmere sweater.
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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2000
As co-founder of the American Dime Museum, home to a two-headed calf and other freaks of nature, Dick Horne prefers a "professorial" image, "not seedy, but borderline," he explains. Horne's wife, WBJC on-air personality and Baltimore Symphony chorus member Dyana Neal, prefers an "artsy but sophisticated look." Recently, the couple held forth at the opening of a new Dime Museum wing, featuring an exhibit called, "Midway in Miniature." They looked grand; he in his dark hues, she in leather slacks and a cashmere sweater.
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By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | July 18, 1996
Stylist Paul Skotarczak believes a visit to a beauty salon should be an experience of renewal -- a chance to sit back, find new confidence and emerge for the better.He may have discovered the key to reflection during his years as a semi-cloistered monk of the Black Franciscan order, where he also studied for his degree in philosophy. Although his time as a monk was a rich spiritual experience, he says, he wanted more."I thought it possible to touch and influence more people by being in the world," he says.
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By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2011
You came, you saw, you bought everything. Now how do you incorporate those Missoni pieces into your existing home décor? The Missoni Collection crashed Target's website in a matter of seconds. Within 20 minutes of stores opening, the women's wear line was almost completely sold out. Soon customers were lined up at the check-out aisles, their carts overflowing with merchandise baring the Italian designer's unmistakable zigzag pattern. They came, they saw, they bought everything.
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By Elsa Klensch | May 30, 1996
At 6-foot-2, I am always the tallest in the crowd. At school I hide my height by wearing baggy clothes - mostly sweats and jeans. I desperately want to look more feminine, but I have problems deciding on the right clothes.Last summer when I turned 16, I bought a slip dress. My fathetook one look at me and said I looked like a bean pole.What should I look for? I want to wear dresses, particularly as they are now fashionable.Stop trying to hide your height. Consider yourself lucky. You're as tall as many of the supermodels who come down the runway, and they look great.
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By VIDA ROBERTS and VIDA ROBERTS,SUN FASHION EDITOR | July 13, 1997
Those new old knitsMissoni, a status label of the '70s, has been resurrected for the '90s. The Italian house, which was known for its distinctive and colorful zigzag and striped knits for men and women, fell out fTC of fashion for two decades, a victim of Armanization and minimalist fashion. With the revival of so many '70s influences in today's collections, the Missoni style has clout once more.Many designers put patterned knits in their collections, and the style looks fresh after many years of black sweatering.
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By [SUSAN REIMER] | May 4, 2008
SAUCY SHOES One Park Place, Suite 3, Annapolis / / Open 10 a.m.- 6 p.m. Monday-Saturday, noon-4 p.m. Sunday / / 410-263-3425 ........................ SARAH GOODALL SAYS SHE HAS THE SHOP of her dreams. But it looks like she has the closet of her dreams. The Chestertown native was 30 and had worked and lived in Baltimore for seven years as a regional sales manager for Pitney Bowles. "I was ready to leave the city, and I had always dreamed of having my own shop," she said. So she opened Saucy Shoes in the new Park Place development in Annapolis and filled the tiny shop in the high-end complex with high-end shoes and purses: Missoni, Kate Spade, Delman, Pedro Garcia, Tibe, Rafe, Hollywould and Bettye Muller.
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By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | November 3, 1994
Q: I am having a discussion with my grandmother who was once the society editor of the paper in her town. She thinks she knows it all and insists that if a woman has style she must always look the same. She cites Jackie Onassis, Grace Kelly and even the Duchess of Windsor as examples.I say that today's woman with style has to change to reflect new trends. Otherwise she will appear old-fashioned and so lose her style. Which of us is right?A: You both are. A woman with style has to know herself well -- the good features she should play up; the bad ones she should camouflage.
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By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | July 18, 1996
Stylist Paul Skotarczak believes a visit to a beauty salon should be an experience of renewal -- a chance to sit back, find new confidence and emerge for the better.He may have discovered the key to reflection during his years as a semi-cloistered monk of the Black Franciscan order, where he also studied for his degree in philosophy. Although his time as a monk was a rich spiritual experience, he says, he wanted more."I thought it possible to touch and influence more people by being in the world," he says.
FEATURES
By N.Y. Times News Service | March 6, 1991
MILAN, Italy -- The neat nosegays, rather than elaborate flowering plants, that accompanied invitations to the fall and winter ready-to-wear shows here this week were a sign of the times: Ostentation is out. Extravagant nightly entertainment is a thing of the past, and the clothes, designed under the shadow of war, are more soothing than shocking. Hemlines are coming down, albeit gradually, a sobering fact in itself.Ottavio and Rosita Missoni, the knitwear specialists who were among the designers who successfully campaigned 15 years ago for this city to become a fashion center, introduced their collection in their showroom, bypassing the mammoth fair where most shows take place.
FEATURES
By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 16, 1997
I am a successful lawyer married to a man 15 years older. I am big-boned, in my late 40s, and because of my size I have always felt comfortable wearing dark colors, particularly black. Dark colors were also practical for the big-city life we lived.Now my husband has retired, and we are moving to Miami. Since I will still be working, I am concerned about my dark clothes. I will never wear pastels, and I cringe at the thought of beige.I know I have to buy a lighter wardrobe. Where do I start?
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