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By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | August 15, 1995
Their hands blistered and their arms bumpy with bug bites, two brothers from Arbutus have come ashore safely after a 48-day, 2,000-mile kayak trip down the steamy Mississippi River.The brothers had a couple of close calls, a brush with tropical storm Erin, and some uncomfortably hot nights spent with mosquitoes as tent mates, but they said their high expectations for the trip were fully met."I was just blown away by the treatment we received from people along the way," Alex Gupman, 22, said after landing Sunday in New Orleans.
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NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley rallied volunteers in Iowa and roused Democratic Party faithful in Minnesota Saturday during a swing through the heartland. O'Malley has embarked on a frenetic campaign to help Democrats across the country in the midterm elections and to help lay the groundwork for his own potential presidential bid.  "I'm going to be very blunt here," said Brad Anderson, a Democrat running to be Iowa's next secretary of state.  "There are few people that has been more helpful to Iowa Democrats in 2014 than Governor Martin O'Malley.
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NEWS
By Richard Fausset and Jenny Jarvie and Richard Fausset and Jenny Jarvie,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 20, 2008
WINFIELD, Mo. - Water from the swollen Mississippi River surged over more than 10 levees yesterday, flooding huge swaths of Missouri farmland as thousands of volunteers continued to pile up sandbags in a desperate bid to protect their communities. The river blasted a 150-foot breach Wednesday night in a levee east of Winfield, a rural and commuter city of 1,200 about an hour north of St. Louis. Volunteers from as far away as Utah gathered in the small Missouri town yesterday to shovel sand into bags, but another levee breached and then another.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
A Houston-based company asked Maryland for a permit to ship millions of gallons of crude oil through its South Baltimore marine terminal as the nation's oil industry surges. Another company in the Fairfield industrial area began moving crude oil in recent years from tank cars hauled by locomotives onto barges for shipment to refineries or asphalt plants. While the boom in U.S. crude oil production is helping to reduce the nation's dependence on imports, the rapidly expanding domestic transport of crude by rail and barge is raising concerns after several derailments and explosions and a barge accident that spilled crude into the Mississippi River.
NEWS
By Tobin Porterfield | May 25, 2011
Whether or not one agrees with the logic of dynamiting levees and opening spillways to sacrifice small towns in order to save downstream cities, the flooding of the Mississippi River area is a noteworthy economic phenomenon. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is strategically releasing water to relieve pressure on the levee system to divert the torrent of water resulting from heavy spring rains and snowmelt. Old Man River is washing away thousands of homes, businesses and farms across 635 miles of river, from Illinois to the Gulf of Mexico.
FEATURES
By Susanne Hopkins and Susanne Hopkins,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | October 22, 1995
I told a friend I was going to Memphis."Memphis?" he said. "Isn't that where the ducks march?"It certainly is. Twice a day, in fact. But there's more to Memphis than the Peabody ducks marching down a red carpet in the venerable hotel's lobby -- although that is a most charming feature of this Tennessee town.Perched on a bluff with the Mississippi River as its front yard, this city of nearly 700,000 is a kick-back place where friendliness oozes out of its citizens like honey from a comb, and where you can spend several days discovering its curiosities.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Tom Horton and Heather Dewar and Tom Horton,Sun Staff | September 25, 2000
ST. JAMES PARISH, LA. The breeze blowing from the Mississippi River across sugar cane fields to Emelda West's house carries the sting of ammonia. Since West's girlhood, the nation's densest concentration of fertilizer factories has risen along the river upstream from New Orleans. The two closest to her home are among America's top 25 sources of toxic pollution. Folks in West's neighborhood hardly ever swim in the river anymore. Even in stifling heat, they close their windows to shut out the breeze.
NEWS
By Rosemary Armao and Rosemary Armao,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1997
C GRAFTON, Ill. -- It seems the most unlikely place to witness any marvel of nature -- the dull olive-brown-gray flatlands of the Missouri-Illinois border. And the months before spring are the worst: The trees are nothing but scrubby sticks, the limestone bluffs ragged and uninspiring, the yellow strip down the middle of Old River Road the only vibrant color.But over the last decade, in the worst part of winter, growing numbers of tourists are trekking to these muddy shores of the frigid Mississippi River.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 15, 2003
CAERNARVON, La. -- In little nibbles and great gulps, the great Mississippi Delta is disappearing as the salty Gulf of Mexico invades and corrodes the landscape, a football field every 30 minutes, about 35 square miles a year at the present rate. Now, in vast areas of the Delta, where the only thing thicker than the biting insects is the air that holds them up, there's no longer such a thing as terra firma. The Mississippi River, the natural force that once counteracted the erosion by bathing the Delta in fresh sediment and building wetlands, has been rendered impotent by decades of flood-control projects and dredging for oil and gas exploration.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | August 31, 1994
One of Baltimore's two remaining grain elevators closed yesterday, further eroding what little is left of the grain business that once accounted for nearly a fifth of the port's exports.The shutdown came as Mississippi River Grain Inc. in Canton, formerly known as Central Soya Co. Inc., was sold to ConAgra Inc., an Omaha, Neb.-based food and agriculture conglomerate.ConAgra, which received the local operation as part of its purchase of Mississippi River's five grain elevators nationwide, is not expected to reopen the huge grain elevator here.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
Tropical Storm Karen is forecast to make landfall on the coasts of Louisiana or Mississippi on Saturday, possibly as a weak hurricane, or at least close to that strength. The storm had maximum sustained winds of 60 mph as of Friday morning, moving within 300 miles of the mouth of the Mississippi River. To reach hurricane status, sustained winds must be at least 74 mph. Karen is not forecast to strengthen significantly Friday, but could on Saturday, according to National Hurricane Center forecasts.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2013
Potential bidders for a Mississippi-style riverboat that once offered dinner cruises on the Delaware River near Philadelphia are scheduled to arrive this week from up and down the East Coast for a dockside auction in Canton. The 140-foot Liberty Belle will go to auction Thursday with a starting bid of just $50,000, said Scott Frank, of Alex Cooper Auctioneers Inc., which is handling the sale. Frank said he won't speculate on how high the bidding might rise from there, but he expects "someone's going to get a great deal.
SPORTS
February 1, 2013
Here's something you won't have to worry about in Baltimore. New Orleans drivers sat in gridlock Friday morning because the city's Mardi Gras floats had to be towed back across the Mississippi River after a local parade on the west bank. The floats, which are shared with the local communities and used for a number of different events, are stored at a giant warehouse called Mardi Gras World, which is adjacent to the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center that houses the massive Super Bowl Media Center.
NEWS
By Tobin Porterfield | May 25, 2011
Whether or not one agrees with the logic of dynamiting levees and opening spillways to sacrifice small towns in order to save downstream cities, the flooding of the Mississippi River area is a noteworthy economic phenomenon. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is strategically releasing water to relieve pressure on the levee system to divert the torrent of water resulting from heavy spring rains and snowmelt. Old Man River is washing away thousands of homes, businesses and farms across 635 miles of river, from Illinois to the Gulf of Mexico.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2011
A body believed to be the brother of Ravens safety Ed Reed was retrieved from the Mississippi River on Tuesday, 18 days after Brian Reed went into the water trying to escape from police in Kenner, La. Identification of the body is pending an autopsy to be performed by the Jefferson Parish Coroner's Office on Wednesday. According to Kenner police spokesman Lt. Wayne McInnis, the body was found less than a quarter mile — and some 30 feet off shore — from the place Brian Reed went into the river around 10 a.m. on Jan. 7. Texas Equusearch, a volunteer organization that helps families find missing relatives, confirmed the recovery of a submerged body in the area of 153 r d Street in Kenner to New Orleans TV station WDSU.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2011
Ravens Pro Bowl safety Ed Reed traveled with the team to Kansas City Saturday and is expected to play today against the Chiefs despite not knowing the whereabouts of a brother who disappeared near New Orleans on Friday. Ed Reed was on the team's charter that left Baltimore around 2 p.m. Saturday, according to a team spokesman. Ed Reed told ESPN that his brother "loved football. He would want me to play. " Brian Reed has been missing since police say he jumped into the Mississippi River Friday.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 2, 1993
CHICAGO -- The flooding along the Mississippi will be having a ripple effect on consumers.The flood-swollen Mississippi River will be closed to boat traffic for three more weeks or longer, causing tens of millions of dollars in losses to the shippers and companies that must find other, more expensive ways to move their products.Consumers could see higher prices in the weeks and months ahead on everything from grain to electricity because shipping costs are increasing and the cost of grain futures contracts at the Chicago Board of Trade have been rising as fast as the river.
NEWS
May 16, 2001
MUSIC ALONG THE MISSISSIPPI Row down the Mississippi River of music for a River of Song at www.pbs.org / riverofsong / . Start out at Inger, Minn., and head south to Louisiana. The cold North offers Ojibwe drummers and Scandinavian fiddlers, while the Midwestern Crossroads is bluegrass country. From Kentucky to Mississippi you'll find soul and the beginnings of rock 'n' roll. And the Deep South is home to Cajun, gospel, blues and honky-tonk music. This trip down the Mississippi River will introduce you to the wide variety of music found in America's heartland.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2010
Sue Muller carefully scraped the dry dirt from a spot along Columbia's Lake Elkhorn walking path, using a small garden trowel and a water-filled spray bottle to soften the earth until she saw the white of turtle eggs peeking through. The Howard County naturalist kept at it, slowly carving out the rectangular hole painstakingly dug two weeks before by a ridge-backed turtle of a species normally found along the Mississippi River. Muller stopped for a time to invite passers-by Lucas Julian, 6, and his mother, Irene, of Clary's Forest to watch and learn, but then returned to her main task.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | October 25, 2009
One hundred million years in development, Maryland's first dinosaur park is set to be turned over Monday to the Prince George's County Department of Parks and Recreation and opened to the public. The 7.5-acre parcel contains what county archaeologist Donald Creveling called "one of the most prolific sites for dinosaur and plant fossils east of the Mississippi River, and it's right here between Baltimore and Washington." While the park will provide public parking, walkways, evocative plantings and interpretive signs, access to the fossil deposits themselves will be limited.
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