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By Donna St. George and Donna St. George,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 27, 1992
BAMBOO PLANTATION, Miss. -- In the sandy, soft soil where a small black church buried its dead, there now grows a field of snowy-white cotton.The Rev. Earnest Ware grew up here, in a plantation community of black workers who made their living picking cotton and soybeans. They slept in shacks and worshiped at their own church and dug graves in the churchyard for their dead, maybe 100 or 200 people in half a century.Thirty years later, the community is gone, the church is gone, and now the graves sprout cotton.
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SPORTS
By CHRISTIAN EWELL and CHRISTIAN EWELL,SUN REPORTER | February 1, 2006
Timmy Bailey, a 21-year-old linebacker expected to sign a national letter of intent with Mississippi State today, knows a lot about battles. But it had been a while since any of them came on the recruiting front. Bailey is finishing his final six credits at Mississippi Delta Community College in Moorhead, Miss., following 17 months of duty with the Army National Guard. Most of it was in Iraq, where he drove a five-ton truck. "One day, we were watching vehicles and we got mortared," said Bailey, recalling his most hazardous day. "It was 15 feet away from me. It was the loudest sound I'd ever heard.
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FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Staff Writer | August 1, 1993
Clarksdale, Miss. -- e were sitting beneath a shade tree, Bear Taylor and I, sitting in the still of a lazy, hot Mississippi Delta afternoon, and old Bear, 88, was singing."
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 20, 2002
CLARKSDALE, Miss. - In the Mississippi Delta, the land is so flat it's hard to believe the world is round, and the sun-scorched desolation seems to go on forever. No matter how prosperous the nation has become, the Delta is still stuck in the Depression. Billions of federal dollars have spilled over the levees and flooded the Delta over the years without leaving a trace. At a time when unemployment nationally hovers between 5 percent and 6 percent, it can top 20 in some Delta counties, and the region badly lags behind in education and health.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 15, 1996
Although the Mississippi Delta is best known for the blues, the area also produced another phenomenon -- Endesha Ida Mae Holland.A former streetwalker who later walked the streets in civil rights protests, Holland is now a professor and playwright. Her autobiographical drama, "From the Mississippi Delta," is receiving a moving, highly theatrical production at the Rep Stage Company, in cooperation with the Columbia Festival of the Arts.Three talented actresses -- Rachel D. Spaght, Dormetria Robinson and Sadiqa Pettaway -- each portray not only Holland, but also the folks she comes across from her rural childhood through the granting of her doctorate at the University of Minnesota.
NEWS
June 30, 1993
Boris ChristoffOpera greatROME -- Boris Christoff, one of opera's greatest basses and a renowned interpreter of Mussorgsky's "Boris Godunov," died Monday at home from the effects of a stroke suffered six years ago, said his wife, Franca.Mr. Christoff, 79, brought deep psychological insight and meticulous phrasing to his many roles. His voice was focused and rich, and he was comfortable singing in Italian, German or Russian.Aside from Godunov, he specialized in Verdi's grand old men and kings, including King Philip in "Don Carlo" and Fiesco in "Simon Boccanegra."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Sun | January 4, 1991
Washington--There is plenty of down-home blues infusing Endesha Ida Mae Holland's drama "From the Mississippi Delta" at Arena Stage's Kreeger Theater, and like the blues her play is both sad and humorously life-affirming.This episodic chronicle of the civil rights movement in a small Mississippi town is full of autobiographical fervor drawn from Ms. Holland's own youth. So there is much evocative detail that imaginatively takes us into the "shotgun" houses that are no more than shacks and the juke joints where the poor go to have fun.What makes this Southern agrarian detail somewhat unusual in playwriting terms is that three actresses embody all of the small town characters regardless of race, sex or age. Sometimes Cheryl Lynn Bruce, Sybil Walker and Jacqueline Williams portray separate characters and sometimes aspects of the same character.
SPORTS
By CHRISTIAN EWELL and CHRISTIAN EWELL,SUN REPORTER | February 1, 2006
Timmy Bailey, a 21-year-old linebacker expected to sign a national letter of intent with Mississippi State today, knows a lot about battles. But it had been a while since any of them came on the recruiting front. Bailey is finishing his final six credits at Mississippi Delta Community College in Moorhead, Miss., following 17 months of duty with the Army National Guard. Most of it was in Iraq, where he drove a five-ton truck. "One day, we were watching vehicles and we got mortared," said Bailey, recalling his most hazardous day. "It was 15 feet away from me. It was the loudest sound I'd ever heard.
NEWS
By BILL BISHOP | July 12, 1999
POOR, RURAL places remain that way because the people who live there behave in ways that keep them in poverty. They shirk work, think only of the present and abandon hope and ambition. The people there are poor because their culture is self-destructive.Or, poor, rural places remain that way because of structural reasons that have nothing to do with the local culture. Owners of capital have exploited the land and people. Racism maintains a perverse social structure. Money and power are held stingily by a very few. Poor people are kept that way by a system that refuses to change.
NEWS
By Curtis Wilkie | March 1, 1995
Oxford, Miss. -- UNDAUNTED BY earlier failures to sustain magazines dealing with Southern literature and lifestyles, the PTC Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the University of Mississippi has just published the premiere issue of Reckon, an impressive collection of articles, photographs, a civil rights retrospective and a long work of fiction by Barry Hannah.The magazine's title is based on a regional colloquialism; the word is often used to express an opinion, such as: "I reckon that mule's worth a hundred dollars."
NEWS
By BILL BISHOP | July 12, 1999
POOR, RURAL places remain that way because the people who live there behave in ways that keep them in poverty. They shirk work, think only of the present and abandon hope and ambition. The people there are poor because their culture is self-destructive.Or, poor, rural places remain that way because of structural reasons that have nothing to do with the local culture. Owners of capital have exploited the land and people. Racism maintains a perverse social structure. Money and power are held stingily by a very few. Poor people are kept that way by a system that refuses to change.
FEATURES
By David Standish and David Standish,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 5, 1998
It's a big, plain, hand-painted sign on the side of an old barn. The words on the ramshackle building, on a country road a few miles east of U.S. Highway 61 outside Cleveland, Miss., say "DOCKERY FARMS, EST. 1895."This was the source, the cotton plantation where, in the early part of the 20th century, Charlie Patton, the first great Delta bluesman, worked and lived -- and influenced generations of blues musicians. Robert Johnson, a key figure in early Delta blues, learned from him. His music also inspired Howlin' Wolf, Muddy Waters and others who moved to Chicago in the 1940s, where their music became the "electric urban blues" that were the headwaters of rock and roll.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 15, 1996
Although the Mississippi Delta is best known for the blues, the area also produced another phenomenon -- Endesha Ida Mae Holland.A former streetwalker who later walked the streets in civil rights protests, Holland is now a professor and playwright. Her autobiographical drama, "From the Mississippi Delta," is receiving a moving, highly theatrical production at the Rep Stage Company, in cooperation with the Columbia Festival of the Arts.Three talented actresses -- Rachel D. Spaght, Dormetria Robinson and Sadiqa Pettaway -- each portray not only Holland, but also the folks she comes across from her rural childhood through the granting of her doctorate at the University of Minnesota.
NEWS
By Curtis Wilkie | March 1, 1995
Oxford, Miss. -- UNDAUNTED BY earlier failures to sustain magazines dealing with Southern literature and lifestyles, the PTC Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the University of Mississippi has just published the premiere issue of Reckon, an impressive collection of articles, photographs, a civil rights retrospective and a long work of fiction by Barry Hannah.The magazine's title is based on a regional colloquialism; the word is often used to express an opinion, such as: "I reckon that mule's worth a hundred dollars."
FEATURES
By Larry Hoffman and Larry Hoffman,Special to The Sun | April 24, 1994
Summertime is a celebration of the blues. Many cities showcase their home-grown talent while others import players from all over the country. These blues festivals occur from late spring to early fall, and provide perhaps the best way to learn and deepen an appreciation of the music.Each year the blues seems to make ever-greater inroads into American popular culture. Television commercials, movie scores, even sitcom soundtracks routinely -- if unconsciously -- clone the piercing slide guitar chords and haunting harmonica lines that have long been the fiery substance of traditional blues music.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Staff Writer | August 1, 1993
Clarksdale, Miss. -- e were sitting beneath a shade tree, Bear Taylor and I, sitting in the still of a lazy, hot Mississippi Delta afternoon, and old Bear, 88, was singing."
FEATURES
By Larry Hoffman and Larry Hoffman,Special to The Sun | April 24, 1994
Summertime is a celebration of the blues. Many cities showcase their home-grown talent while others import players from all over the country. These blues festivals occur from late spring to early fall, and provide perhaps the best way to learn and deepen an appreciation of the music.Each year the blues seems to make ever-greater inroads into American popular culture. Television commercials, movie scores, even sitcom soundtracks routinely -- if unconsciously -- clone the piercing slide guitar chords and haunting harmonica lines that have long been the fiery substance of traditional blues music.
FEATURES
By David Standish and David Standish,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 5, 1998
It's a big, plain, hand-painted sign on the side of an old barn. The words on the ramshackle building, on a country road a few miles east of U.S. Highway 61 outside Cleveland, Miss., say "DOCKERY FARMS, EST. 1895."This was the source, the cotton plantation where, in the early part of the 20th century, Charlie Patton, the first great Delta bluesman, worked and lived -- and influenced generations of blues musicians. Robert Johnson, a key figure in early Delta blues, learned from him. His music also inspired Howlin' Wolf, Muddy Waters and others who moved to Chicago in the 1940s, where their music became the "electric urban blues" that were the headwaters of rock and roll.
NEWS
June 30, 1993
Boris ChristoffOpera greatROME -- Boris Christoff, one of opera's greatest basses and a renowned interpreter of Mussorgsky's "Boris Godunov," died Monday at home from the effects of a stroke suffered six years ago, said his wife, Franca.Mr. Christoff, 79, brought deep psychological insight and meticulous phrasing to his many roles. His voice was focused and rich, and he was comfortable singing in Italian, German or Russian.Aside from Godunov, he specialized in Verdi's grand old men and kings, including King Philip in "Don Carlo" and Fiesco in "Simon Boccanegra."
NEWS
By Donna St. George and Donna St. George,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 27, 1992
BAMBOO PLANTATION, Miss. -- In the sandy, soft soil where a small black church buried its dead, there now grows a field of snowy-white cotton.The Rev. Earnest Ware grew up here, in a plantation community of black workers who made their living picking cotton and soybeans. They slept in shacks and worshiped at their own church and dug graves in the churchyard for their dead, maybe 100 or 200 people in half a century.Thirty years later, the community is gone, the church is gone, and now the graves sprout cotton.
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