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By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2005
Some evangelical groups are mixing Christian missionary work with humanitarian aid in countries ravaged by the tsunamis and earthquake, a provocative approach shunned by the majority of faith-based relief organizations. Spreading faith this way can antagonize the people they're trying to help, and there's evidence of concern among Muslims, Hindus and others. But evangelical leaders say they define humanitarian aid as having a spiritual component. Aid should "share the love of Christ," said the Rev. Franklin Graham, son of the Rev. Billy Graham and the outspoken leader of Samaritan's Purse, which is shipping shelter materials and other emergency donations to Indonesia and Sri Lanka.
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NEWS
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2005
Some evangelical groups are mixing Christian missionary work with humanitarian aid in countries ravaged by the tsunamis and earthquake, a provocative approach shunned by the majority of faith-based relief organizations. Spreading faith this way can antagonize the people they're trying to help, and there's evidence of concern among Muslims, Hindus and others. But evangelical leaders say they define humanitarian aid as having a spiritual component. Aid should "share the love of Christ," said the Rev. Franklin Graham, son of the Rev. Billy Graham and the outspoken leader of Samaritan's Purse, which is shipping shelter materials and other emergency donations to Indonesia and Sri Lanka.
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NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | May 28, 1995
Twenty children from a remote part of India visit Chapelgate Presbyterian Church in Marriottsville today to present a musical drama celebrating the conversion of their Hmar tribe to Christianity in the early part of this century.The free performance, by the India Children's Choir, is part of a yearlong tour that by the end of this month will have brought the choir to 100 cities in 20 states, according to its sponsor, the Illinois-based Bibles for the World.The visit dovetails with the missionary work of the 1,349-member Chapelgate congregation, one of whose members will leave this summer for missionary work in India.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2001
Three Howard County missionaries who won a new trial after pleading guilty to smuggling youngsters into the United States to work in menial jobs were sentenced a second time in federal court in Baltimore yesterday -- and got harsher terms. U.S. District Judge Marvin J. Garbis more than doubled the sentences he imposed in 1999 on Joyce E. Perdue and Robert C. Hendricks, and added three months to Elizabeth Brown's prison term. Garbis said the evidence he heard during the trial in December worked against the missionaries, showing that they exploited the children they brought from Estonia under the pretense of giving them religious training.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1998
As a Baltimore police officer, the Rev. Edward V. Walter Sr. helped keep the streets of the Northern District safe. But his real mission was preaching the gospel in the inner city.Mr. Walter, 87, a nondenominational minister, died Aug. 10 at St. Joseph Medical Center of respiratory failure brought on by asbestosis. He had been exposed to airborne asbestos fibers during World War II, when he was employed to deliver the material to Baltimore shipyards.Mr. Walter's church was the city. He carried Bible tracts while he was on duty as a patrolman in the Police Department's Northern District and Traffic Division and preached during his lunch hour, said his daughter Joy Wallnofer.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 24, 2001
THEY ARE MORMON missionaries, and they believe in sharing their faith. Sometimes that means going overseas. Sometimes that means going to Crofton. Meet Elder Dohrman. The 21-year-old California man's brother is a missionary in Argentina. One friend was a missionary in Thailand, another in Japan. Dohrman is happy to have been sent to Crofton to study, pray and spread his church's word. "I love it here," he says of his new home. For several months, he and three young missionary colleagues from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints have been living in a Crofton apartment.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1996
Spending two weeks on the grounds of a restored 18th century manor house in the historic Irish countryside may sound like the makings for a great vacation. But for the Cole family of Severn, the trip will be a labor of love.David and Nancy Cole and son Charles will leave for County Meath, Ireland, tomorrow to begin two weeks of volunteer work at a Christian youth camp.They have raised donations to cover their $2,580 air fare, and will pay $70 each to live at Drewstown House and work 14-hour days as counselors and, for Nancy Cole, doing administrative tasks.
NEWS
March 29, 1993
Carroll man serving as missionaryCraig Finkner, 19, recently left Westminster to take up residence as a missionary for the next two years at the Spanish-speaking Mission of San Jose in San Jose, Calif., operated by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.A son of Ron and Debby Finkner of Westminster, he is a 1991 graduate of Westminster High School and attended Carroll Community College. Following completion of his missionary work, he plans to attend Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | June 24, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- Getting a glimpse of what her future may hold, Allison Liquefato is making her way to Israel.The 15-year-old Westminster High student, who hopes to become a missionary after college, is taking the first steps toward her dream by joining the Teen Missions program this summer."
NEWS
By Diane Reynolds and Diane Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 30, 2001
At a time in life when the typical young person is self-consumed, 20-year-old Clarence E. Johnson was knocking on doors in rural Mississippi, telling people about the saving power of Jesus Christ. Johnson, now 61, has dedicated his life to serving God and recently was appointed Columbia stake president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This is underscored by his vision: "If I were somehow able to persuade people that they are children of God and that he loves them and desires to bless them, and if I could somehow help people understand how significant that really is, that is what I'd like to accomplish.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 24, 2001
THEY ARE MORMON missionaries, and they believe in sharing their faith. Sometimes that means going overseas. Sometimes that means going to Crofton. Meet Elder Dohrman. The 21-year-old California man's brother is a missionary in Argentina. One friend was a missionary in Thailand, another in Japan. Dohrman is happy to have been sent to Crofton to study, pray and spread his church's word. "I love it here," he says of his new home. For several months, he and three young missionary colleagues from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints have been living in a Crofton apartment.
NEWS
By Diane Reynolds and Diane Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 30, 2001
At a time in life when the typical young person is self-consumed, 20-year-old Clarence E. Johnson was knocking on doors in rural Mississippi, telling people about the saving power of Jesus Christ. Johnson, now 61, has dedicated his life to serving God and recently was appointed Columbia stake president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This is underscored by his vision: "If I were somehow able to persuade people that they are children of God and that he loves them and desires to bless them, and if I could somehow help people understand how significant that really is, that is what I'd like to accomplish.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 2000
When Steven Lundberg was 19, he began serving a 2 1/2-year mission in Germany -- going door-to-door spreading the teachings of his Mormon religion, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Now a colonel stationed at the Army Research Laboratory in Adelphi, Lundberg, 55, serves as bishop to one of the congregations that meet at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints building in Ellicott City. The church is home to three congregations, or wards, in the area. Two wards come from Columbia and the other is from the Catonsville/Ellicott City area.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 9, 1998
EVER SINCE Jerry and Lillie Rebert and their children, Jill, Heather and Leah, left for Kenya in August they have been writing letters and sending e-mail to folks in Carroll County about the thrills and frustrations of their missionary work in Africa.Their notes are a gentle reminder that no matter how tough our days may get or how tight the household budget might be, we have so much to be thankful for."Food is expensive. A box of cereal is about $5; a can of deodorant is $10," Lillie Rebert wrote last month.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 31, 1998
THIS MONTH, WHILE Americans anxiously watched news accounts of the bombings of two U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, Jerry and Lillie Rebert and their daughters Jill, 16, Heather, 12, and Leah, 9, left their Westminster home to spend two years as missionaries for Africa Inland Mission International.Four years ago, the family spent one summer helping families in Kenya and Tanzania, and they had been working toward returning."You don't go this far to stop," Jerry Rebert said after the bombings.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1998
As a Baltimore police officer, the Rev. Edward V. Walter Sr. helped keep the streets of the Northern District safe. But his real mission was preaching the gospel in the inner city.Mr. Walter, 87, a nondenominational minister, died Aug. 10 at St. Joseph Medical Center of respiratory failure brought on by asbestosis. He had been exposed to airborne asbestos fibers during World War II, when he was employed to deliver the material to Baltimore shipyards.Mr. Walter's church was the city. He carried Bible tracts while he was on duty as a patrolman in the Police Department's Northern District and Traffic Division and preached during his lunch hour, said his daughter Joy Wallnofer.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Staff writer | November 14, 1990
WESTMINSTER - For 20 years, Sally Reinecke worked in the heart of Africa, teaching village women ways to improve domestic life.She, too, was learning -- about the lives and beliefs of the Central Africans -- and shared that knowledge with friends and family to whom she wrote frequently.In those letters, which have just been published by Westminster United Methodist Church, where Reinecke has been a member since her retirement in 1972, she tells many stories of Africa's people and culture.
NEWS
By Jane Lippy and Jane Lippy,Contributing writer | February 20, 1991
The crack of gunfire and the pounding of artillery shells weren't Gail Stuart's most frightening moments deep in the heart of Africa.What was more unnerving was a bat flying around the home the Sykesville woman and her husband, Rick, occupied during missionary work last fall in Rwanda.Rick, 29, had his share of difficulty, too. It was hard leaving his wife in the base camp town of Butari while he and other missionaries embarked on field work for several weeks at a time.The couple, members of Friendship Baptist Church in Sykesville, served 15 months as missionaries in Rwanda, a Maryland-sized country in east-central Africa.
NEWS
July 30, 1997
Views conflict on Peruvian mission workGinger Thompson and The Sun should be ashamed for the biased cheerleading in the July 20 and 21 two-part article about missionary work in the Peruvian rain forest.Missionaries have destroyed a unique culture they encountered simply because they believe that their culture is superior.They have infected the indigenous peoples with deadly diseases and have bribed, tricked and deceived those human beings, while claiming to be morally and religiously advanced.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1996
Spending two weeks on the grounds of a restored 18th century manor house in the historic Irish countryside may sound like the makings for a great vacation. But for the Cole family of Severn, the trip will be a labor of love.David and Nancy Cole and son Charles will leave for County Meath, Ireland, tomorrow to begin two weeks of volunteer work at a Christian youth camp.They have raised donations to cover their $2,580 air fare, and will pay $70 each to live at Drewstown House and work 14-hour days as counselors and, for Nancy Cole, doing administrative tasks.
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