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August 6, 1992
Thousands gathered yesterday outside St. Wenceslaus Church in East Baltimore to catch a glimpse of Mother Teresa as she dedicated a convent for her order of Roman Catholic nuns near the church. Mother Teresa is regarded by many as a living saint for her work among the poor of Calcutta. Four nuns from her Missionaries of Charity arrived in Baltimore last April and have been quietly but efficiently ministering to the city's neediest.Mother Teresa's visit was a timely reminder of how much remains to be done to help those who have fallen through society's safety nets, and particularly impoverished AIDS patients.
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NEWS
By Diane Scharper | September 12, 1997
"RIGOROUS poverty has been our safeguard,'' Mother Teresa once observed. ''We do not want, as has been the case with other religious orders throughout history, to begin serving the poor and then gradually move toward serving the rich. In order for us to understand and to help those who lack everything,'' she continued, ''we have to live as they live.''If any one word can explain Mother Teresa, the controversial Roman Catholic nun, whom some believe to be a saint, it's poverty. Members of the Missionaries of Charity, the religious order she founded in Calcutta, India, not only take a vow of poverty, as other religious orders do. They also live it. Missionaries of Charity see poverty as freedom, and believe the fewer material things one has, the fewer things one has to take care of.This way, the sisters can care for ''the poorest of the poor,'' whom they vow to serve.
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NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Frank P. L. Somerville and Bruce Reid and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writers | August 5, 1992
Victoria Goldbech, 72, a lifelong member of St. Wenceslaus Church in East Baltimore, said she hoped to touch a "living saint" today.Mother Teresa of Calcutta, one of the world's most admired religious figures, is scheduled to help dedicate a convent for her order of Roman Catholic nuns today near the church, at Collington and Ashland avenues.Mother Teresa also planned to attend a special Mass for invited guests this afternoon in St. Wenceslaus.Mrs. Goldbech is not alone.As city sanitation crews feverishly cleaned the streets around the church in preparation for Mother Teresa's visit, members of St. Wenceslaus and some residents of the surrounding neighborhood hoped to at least catch of glimpse of the tiny woman they say has done so much good around the world.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1997
Baltimoreans said farewell yesterday to Mother Teresa as they gathered for a Mass at the Basilica of the Assumption, the same place where the nun from Calcutta, India, last year brought her message of prayer, simplicity and commitment to the poor.With four nuns of the Missionaries of Charity, the order founded by Mother Teresa, looking on from a front pew, Cardinal William H. Keeler eulogized her as someone "who by her example of prayer and faith could encourage us to see and believe God's spiritual presence at work in our world."
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1996
Mother Teresa, the 4-foot-10 champion of the poor, visited Baltimore yesterday, offering blessings to the faithful and comfort to the sick.Surrounded by dozens of nuns and about 1,000 admirers, the 85-year-old missionary participated in a Mass at the Basilica of the Assumption, the nation's oldest Roman Catholic cathedral. Looking frail and walking gingerly, she climbed a platform that was placed on the altar especially for her and urged the congregation to strive for compassion and family unity.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | August 5, 1992
Mother Teresa of Calcutta, one of the world's most admired religious figures, is scheduled to help dedicate a convent for her order of Roman Catholic nuns this afternoon in East Baltimore on her first visit to this city.The 81-year-old superior of the Missionaries of Charity, which she founded in India in 1950, will be driven to Baltimore from the American headquarters of the order in the Bronx, N.Y.She plans to attend a special Mass for invited guests at 3 p.m. in St. Wenceslaus Church, at Ashland and Collington avenues.
NEWS
By Diane Scharper | September 12, 1997
"RIGOROUS poverty has been our safeguard,'' Mother Teresa once observed. ''We do not want, as has been the case with other religious orders throughout history, to begin serving the poor and then gradually move toward serving the rich. In order for us to understand and to help those who lack everything,'' she continued, ''we have to live as they live.''If any one word can explain Mother Teresa, the controversial Roman Catholic nun, whom some believe to be a saint, it's poverty. Members of the Missionaries of Charity, the religious order she founded in Calcutta, India, not only take a vow of poverty, as other religious orders do. They also live it. Missionaries of Charity see poverty as freedom, and believe the fewer material things one has, the fewer things one has to take care of.This way, the sisters can care for ''the poorest of the poor,'' whom they vow to serve.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1997
Baltimoreans said farewell yesterday to Mother Teresa as they gathered for a Mass at the Basilica of the Assumption, the same place where the nun from Calcutta, India, last year brought her message of prayer, simplicity and commitment to the poor.With four nuns of the Missionaries of Charity, the order founded by Mother Teresa, looking on from a front pew, Cardinal William H. Keeler eulogized her as someone "who by her example of prayer and faith could encourage us to see and believe God's spiritual presence at work in our world."
FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Arthur Hirsch and Ken Fuson and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1997
To President Clinton, she was "one of the giants of our time." Other world leaders yesterday called her an "angel of mercy," "a symbol to the world."But Mother Teresa, who died yesterday of a heart attack, was more than a symbol to thousands around the world, individuals whose lives she touched through 50 years of work on behalf of the poor and suffering. Here are the recollections of five Marylanders who were touched by her spirit.It was 6 a.m., dawn in Calcutta, when Sean Callahan first met Mother Teresa.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1995
EMMITSBURG -- Mother Teresa came to this small town in Western Maryland last night and urged a crowd of about 2,000 people to serve the poor and pray for those with AIDS."
FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Arthur Hirsch and Ken Fuson and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1997
To President Clinton, she was "one of the giants of our time." Other world leaders yesterday called her an "angel of mercy," "a symbol to the world."But Mother Teresa, who died yesterday of a heart attack, was more than a symbol to thousands around the world, individuals whose lives she touched through 50 years of work on behalf of the poor and suffering. Here are the recollections of five Marylanders who were touched by her spirit.It was 6 a.m., dawn in Calcutta, when Sean Callahan first met Mother Teresa.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1996
Mother Teresa, the 4-foot-10 champion of the poor, visited Baltimore yesterday, offering blessings to the faithful and comfort to the sick.Surrounded by dozens of nuns and about 1,000 admirers, the 85-year-old missionary participated in a Mass at the Basilica of the Assumption, the nation's oldest Roman Catholic cathedral. Looking frail and walking gingerly, she climbed a platform that was placed on the altar especially for her and urged the congregation to strive for compassion and family unity.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1995
EMMITSBURG -- Mother Teresa came to this small town in Western Maryland last night and urged a crowd of about 2,000 people to serve the poor and pray for those with AIDS."
NEWS
August 6, 1992
Thousands gathered yesterday outside St. Wenceslaus Church in East Baltimore to catch a glimpse of Mother Teresa as she dedicated a convent for her order of Roman Catholic nuns near the church. Mother Teresa is regarded by many as a living saint for her work among the poor of Calcutta. Four nuns from her Missionaries of Charity arrived in Baltimore last April and have been quietly but efficiently ministering to the city's neediest.Mother Teresa's visit was a timely reminder of how much remains to be done to help those who have fallen through society's safety nets, and particularly impoverished AIDS patients.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Frank P. L. Somerville and Bruce Reid and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writers | August 5, 1992
Victoria Goldbech, 72, a lifelong member of St. Wenceslaus Church in East Baltimore, said she hoped to touch a "living saint" today.Mother Teresa of Calcutta, one of the world's most admired religious figures, is scheduled to help dedicate a convent for her order of Roman Catholic nuns today near the church, at Collington and Ashland avenues.Mother Teresa also planned to attend a special Mass for invited guests this afternoon in St. Wenceslaus.Mrs. Goldbech is not alone.As city sanitation crews feverishly cleaned the streets around the church in preparation for Mother Teresa's visit, members of St. Wenceslaus and some residents of the surrounding neighborhood hoped to at least catch of glimpse of the tiny woman they say has done so much good around the world.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | August 5, 1992
The Missionaries of Charity, the order of nuns founded by Mother Teresa shortly after World War II, arrived here Easter Sunday to work with the poor, sick and dying. A week hadn't passed before the small religious community of four nuns took to some of the meaner streets in Baltimore. They knocked on doors at the Lexington Terrace public housing project, seeking to help residents. Soon, they were visiting AIDS patients at Johns Hopkins Hospital.The establishment of a new religious community in Baltimore, especially a branch of one of the world's fastest growing order of nuns, would usually be all over the newspapers and television.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | August 5, 1992
The Missionaries of Charity, the order of nuns founded by Mother Teresa shortly after World War II, arrived here Easter Sunday to work with the poor, sick and dying. A week hadn't passed before the small religious community of four nuns took to some of the meaner streets in Baltimore. They knocked on doors at the Lexington Terrace public housing project, seeking to help residents. Soon, they were visiting AIDS patients at Johns Hopkins Hospital.The establishment of a new religious community in Baltimore, especially a branch of one of the world's fastest growing order of nuns, would usually be all over the newspapers and television.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | August 5, 1992
Mother Teresa of Calcutta, one of the world's most admired religious figures, is scheduled to help dedicate a convent for her order of Roman Catholic nuns this afternoon in East Baltimore on her first visit to this city.The 81-year-old superior of the Missionaries of Charity, which she founded in India in 1950, will be driven to Baltimore from the American headquarters of the order in the Bronx, N.Y.She plans to attend a special Mass for invited guests at 3 p.m. in St. Wenceslaus Church, at Ashland and Collington avenues.
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