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By Michael Cabbage and Michael Cabbage,ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 1, 2004
GOLDEN, Colo. - Linda Ham seldom worried about the future during a 21-year career that saw her become one of NASA's most powerful space shuttle managers. Since a year ago today, however, when the Columbia accident claimed the lives of seven astronauts, the future is never far from her mind. For the past two months, the former shuttle executive has been working in the shadow of the Rocky Mountains outside Denver - about 900 miles from her husband and sons in Houston - to help organize a government energy initiative.
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NEWS
June 1, 2009
PAUL HANEY, 80 'Voice of NASA Mission Control' Paul Haney, who was known as the "voice of NASA's Mission Control" for his live televised reports during the early years of the space program, has died of cancer. He was 80. Haney died Thursday at a nursing home. Kent House, owner of the Alamogordo Funeral Home, confirmed that Haney died of complications from melanoma cancer, which spread to his brain and was untreatable. Haney became NASA's information officer in 1958, three months after the space agency was formed and went on to manage information from the Gemini and Apollo flight programs.
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NEWS
June 1, 2009
PAUL HANEY, 80 'Voice of NASA Mission Control' Paul Haney, who was known as the "voice of NASA's Mission Control" for his live televised reports during the early years of the space program, has died of cancer. He was 80. Haney died Thursday at a nursing home. Kent House, owner of the Alamogordo Funeral Home, confirmed that Haney died of complications from melanoma cancer, which spread to his brain and was untreatable. Haney became NASA's information officer in 1958, three months after the space agency was formed and went on to manage information from the Gemini and Apollo flight programs.
NEWS
By ROBYN SHELTON and ROBYN SHELTON,ORLANDO SENTINEL | January 20, 2006
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The fastest spacecraft ever created is speeding toward the solar system's most distant planet, where it will study Pluto, its moon and the icy objects in the nearby Kuiper Belt. The $700 million New Horizons was developed and built at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and will be controlled from the mission operations center on its Howard County campus near Laurel. A Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket blasted off yesterday at 2 p.m. from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, launching New Horizons on the start of its 3 billion-mile journey.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | November 9, 1993
JOHNSON SPACE FLIGHT CENTER, Tex. -- The mock repairs of the Hubble Space Telescope were moving along at a brisk pace when Astronaut Tom Akers alerted NASA mission control to the unidentified flying object in view."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff | April 23, 2000
"Failure is Not an Option: Mission Control from Mercury to Apollo 13 and Beyond," by Gene Kranz. Simon & Schuster. 339 pages. $26. If you weren't up that night listening to the Apollo 13 mission on the radio, you surely heard astronaut Jim Lovell's chilling words replayed the next day: "OK Houston, we have a problem." What you never heard were the near-desperate words of flight director Gene Kranz 10 minutes later, in a private phone call to his boss, Chris Kraft. Kraft was home in the shower when conditions on the crippled, moon-bound spacecraft began cascading toward disaster.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1998
Mission Control is not just for Houston, the Goddard Space Flight Center, or even NASA anymore.After NASA launches its new FUSE astronomy satellite from the Kennedy Space Center in February, it will switch control of the $108 million mission to a control room in the physics building at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.There, scientists and professional operators seated at two rows of computers beneath a video wall will guide the observatory 24 hours a day on its three-year mission.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | February 24, 1993
At "Mission Control," they'll track the space shuttle Discovery's orbit, watch it hurtle through space on a giant television and talk to the astronauts during the nine-day April mission.Pretty heady stuff for elementary school students.At Jarrettsville Elementary, one of only 15 schools worldwide selected for "radio contact" with the shuttle, the students say they're ready to turn a spare classroom into their headquarters for tracking the spacecraft.And when they get their moments to talk to the astronauts, many of the students say they know just what they'll ask.Sara Kidd, 10, wants to hear all about living in a place without gravity.
NEWS
By ROBYN SHELTON and ROBYN SHELTON,ORLANDO SENTINEL | January 20, 2006
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The fastest spacecraft ever created is speeding toward the solar system's most distant planet, where it will study Pluto, its moon and the icy objects in the nearby Kuiper Belt. The $700 million New Horizons was developed and built at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and will be controlled from the mission operations center on its Howard County campus near Laurel. A Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket blasted off yesterday at 2 p.m. from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, launching New Horizons on the start of its 3 billion-mile journey.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 5, 1999
PASADENA, Calif. -- Concern over the fate of the Mars Polar Lander deepened yesterday, after flight controllers failed repeatedly to receive radio signals from the craft on the planet's surface and were forced to fall back on alternative tactics in an effort to re-establish communications.Though mission officials emphasized that they were not giving up, they conceded that their chances of success would be decreasingly slim if they don't hear from the robotic spacecraft in a test today. That's when the lander, following instructions programmed in its computer, is supposed to relay a radio transmission through another spacecraft, the Mars Global Surveyor, which has been orbiting Mars since 1997.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2004
As he watched years of sweat and effort disappear into the night sky atop a trail of fire almost 800 miles away, Karl Fielhauer shouted at his video screen. "C'mon baby, burn!" he yelled as Messenger, the first mission to the planet Mercury in 31 years. blasted off from Cape Canaveral in Florida. The on-time liftoff of NASA's $426 million Messenger spacecraft early yesterday was greeted by whoops and cheers from Fielhauer -- the mission's lead radio engineer -- and dozens of colleagues in the mission control center at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab near Laurel.
NEWS
By Michael Cabbage and Michael Cabbage,ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 1, 2004
GOLDEN, Colo. - Linda Ham seldom worried about the future during a 21-year career that saw her become one of NASA's most powerful space shuttle managers. Since a year ago today, however, when the Columbia accident claimed the lives of seven astronauts, the future is never far from her mind. For the past two months, the former shuttle executive has been working in the shadow of the Rocky Mountains outside Denver - about 900 miles from her husband and sons in Houston - to help organize a government energy initiative.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff | April 23, 2000
"Failure is Not an Option: Mission Control from Mercury to Apollo 13 and Beyond," by Gene Kranz. Simon & Schuster. 339 pages. $26. If you weren't up that night listening to the Apollo 13 mission on the radio, you surely heard astronaut Jim Lovell's chilling words replayed the next day: "OK Houston, we have a problem." What you never heard were the near-desperate words of flight director Gene Kranz 10 minutes later, in a private phone call to his boss, Chris Kraft. Kraft was home in the shower when conditions on the crippled, moon-bound spacecraft began cascading toward disaster.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 5, 1999
PASADENA, Calif. -- Concern over the fate of the Mars Polar Lander deepened yesterday, after flight controllers failed repeatedly to receive radio signals from the craft on the planet's surface and were forced to fall back on alternative tactics in an effort to re-establish communications.Though mission officials emphasized that they were not giving up, they conceded that their chances of success would be decreasingly slim if they don't hear from the robotic spacecraft in a test today. That's when the lander, following instructions programmed in its computer, is supposed to relay a radio transmission through another spacecraft, the Mars Global Surveyor, which has been orbiting Mars since 1997.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1998
Mission Control is not just for Houston, the Goddard Space Flight Center, or even NASA anymore.After NASA launches its new FUSE astronomy satellite from the Kennedy Space Center in February, it will switch control of the $108 million mission to a control room in the physics building at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.There, scientists and professional operators seated at two rows of computers beneath a video wall will guide the observatory 24 hours a day on its three-year mission.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | November 9, 1993
JOHNSON SPACE FLIGHT CENTER, Tex. -- The mock repairs of the Hubble Space Telescope were moving along at a brisk pace when Astronaut Tom Akers alerted NASA mission control to the unidentified flying object in view."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2004
As he watched years of sweat and effort disappear into the night sky atop a trail of fire almost 800 miles away, Karl Fielhauer shouted at his video screen. "C'mon baby, burn!" he yelled as Messenger, the first mission to the planet Mercury in 31 years. blasted off from Cape Canaveral in Florida. The on-time liftoff of NASA's $426 million Messenger spacecraft early yesterday was greeted by whoops and cheers from Fielhauer -- the mission's lead radio engineer -- and dozens of colleagues in the mission control center at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab near Laurel.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 30, 1999
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- With their flawless docking behind them, Discovery's astronauts went on a spacewalk late last night to spruce up the outside of the new international space station.Tamara Jernigan and Daniel Barry floated out of the space shuttle around 11 p.m. The seven-story-plus station loomed above them, jutting straight out of Discovery's cargo bay."Unbelievable!" Jernigan said as she unlocked the hatch.Among their duties during the six-hour outing: attaching a pair of 5-foot cranes to the exterior of the station, hanging out three bags of tools for future spacewalkers, installing a glare-reducing shroud over a docking target, and covering an exposed pin.The spacewalk was expected to last into the wee hours of this morning.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | February 24, 1993
At "Mission Control," they'll track the space shuttle Discovery's orbit, watch it hurtle through space on a giant television and talk to the astronauts during the nine-day April mission.Pretty heady stuff for elementary school students.At Jarrettsville Elementary, one of only 15 schools worldwide selected for "radio contact" with the shuttle, the students say they're ready to turn a spare classroom into their headquarters for tracking the spacecraft.And when they get their moments to talk to the astronauts, many of the students say they know just what they'll ask.Sara Kidd, 10, wants to hear all about living in a place without gravity.
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