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NEWS
September 11, 2013
The debate on Syria is much too limited ("Syrian rebels ready to strike if U.S. does," Sept. 6). It should not be about military effectiveness, national interest, or building coalitions. The more relevant question is why, after 6,000 years of civilization with extraordinary advances in technology, human rights, education, health and quality of life, when another nation acts badly the best we can come up with is to drop explosives on him? Really? We are back to the Stone Age and only the sophistication of the weapons has changed.
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NEWS
July 19, 2014
Letter writer Bruce Knauff, though well-intentioned, misses the point of terror ( "Conflict over Gaza is one-sided," July 16). Although Hamas has been thwarted in killing and maiming more Israelis, that is not their intent. On the contrary, as they themselves have said repeatedly in many ways, their intent is to do as much harm as possible. So when Mr. Knauff and his family or some Israeli and his family are running for cover while rockets are heading their way and sirens are wailing, the terror is real.
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NEWS
February 3, 2014
Despite President Obama's campaign pledge to "push the reset button" on U.S. relations with Russia, America's dealings with its erstwhile Cold War adversary recently have been anything but smooth. Moscow and Washington clashed last year over Russia's offer of temporary asylum to Edward Snowden, the former NSA contractor who leaked thousands of classified documents to the media. Russia has been at best a reluctant partner in U.S. efforts to resolve the conflict in Syria and negotiate a halt to Iran's nuclear program.
NEWS
February 3, 2014
Despite President Obama's campaign pledge to "push the reset button" on U.S. relations with Russia, America's dealings with its erstwhile Cold War adversary recently have been anything but smooth. Moscow and Washington clashed last year over Russia's offer of temporary asylum to Edward Snowden, the former NSA contractor who leaked thousands of classified documents to the media. Russia has been at best a reluctant partner in U.S. efforts to resolve the conflict in Syria and negotiate a halt to Iran's nuclear program.
NEWS
By Jonathan Power | September 14, 1990
New York. EVERY STEP of friendship between Presidents Bush and Gorbachev throws into relief the mine-fielded territory that the Cold War years have left behind.Cold War rivalry led to a fatal disregard for the trouble the superpowers were storing up as they sold all over the world nearly every type of weapon, both for the cash it brought and the friendship it was supposed to fashion. And what wasn't sold with official approval was available from Western businessmen on the black market.Iraq, which over the last 10 years spent more on weapons than Britain, France or West Germany, is merely the tip of it.Every major power has reason to feel shame.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- U.S. intelligence agencies are tracking a North Korean cargo ship that is believed headed for Syria with advanced missiles and missile manufacturing equipment, senior administration officials said yesterday.Such a shipment, while not violating any of North Korea's international pledges, would be prohibited under the Missile Technology Control Regime, which North Korea has not signed.The shipment also indicates the difficulty Washington faces in trying to halt the spread of missiles to the Middle East, particularly when faced with a tenacious provider like North Korea.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 1, 1994
WASHINGTON -- For the first time since the dawn of the nuclear age, the world's two superpowers are no longer in each other's sights.The Defense Department announced yesterday that it had "detargeted" all U.S. strategic missiles, matching a similar move by Russia and taking global nuclear war off hair-trigger readiness.The department added that Britain had also detargeted its nuclear weapons as part of the international effort to step back from nuclear confrontation.Strategic targets in the former Soviet Union and its satellite states had been programmed into the United States' 1,400 strategic nuclear delivery systems.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | August 19, 1994
London.--Five years ago, the International Institute for Strategic Studies published a report commenting on the unannounced discovery the year before by the CIA that China had supplied Saudi Arabia with 50 or 60 second-hand missiles with a range of 2,200 kilometers.''Missiles of such a range,'' it observed, ''are difficult to justify unless they carry nuclear weapons.''These long-range missiles were too expensive and too elaborate to make sense for anything else. Controllable thrust engines, inertial guidance systems and heat shielding put up the cost to astronomical levels.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Partly in response to growing fears of terrorist attacks on U.S. civilian aircraft, the CIA requested $55 million this month for buying back hundreds of the highly efficient Stinger anti-aircraft missiles that the United States gave to Afghan rebels in the 1980s, according to informed U.S. sources.The extraordinary sum -- more than five times the last allocation for the covert Stinger buyback program -- was sought by the Clinton administration from contingency funds because of fierce competition for the prized missiles on the international black market, according to knowledgeable sources.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 13, 1994
ZAGREB, Croatia -- Four U.N. peacekeepers from Bangladesh were injured, at least one seriously, when their armored vehicle was struck yesterday by two anti-tank missiles believed to have been fired by Croatian Serbs in northwestern Bosnia, U.N. officials said.The attack was the most serious to date on the besieged and ill-equipped Bangladeshi battalion, which has been a sitting target since it replaced French troops in the U.N.-declared "safe haven" of Bihac in October.Three quarters of the 1,200 Bangladeshi troops have no guns, and the first food and fuel supplies in two months arrived last week.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 27, 2014
Shades of Cold War anxiety were rekindled recently by reports that Air Force investigations were underway into alleged drug use, as well as cheating on preparedness tests, among nuclear missile launch officers working in the nation's pressure-cooker underground bunkers. Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James told reporters that 11 officers at six such sites were suspected of illegal drug possession. According to the Associated Press, 34 of them at Malmstrom Air Force Base in Montana have had their security clearances suspended.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 14, 2013
Now that both sides in the Great Shutdown Fiasco seem to be inching their way toward an exit strategy, the central concern appears to be how to arrive at it with the least political damage to each of them. Already left in the wreckage is the hope of diehards like Sen. Ted Cruz to defund the dreaded Obamcare. Applicants for health care coverage jam the Internet mechanism set up under the president's signature Affordable Care Act to enroll the uninsured, belying Mr. Cruz's contention that the law is hugely unpopular.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 16, 2013
While the slaughter goes on in the Syrian civil war, a remarkable war of words has broken out over the threatened use of American force there, led by of all people Russian President Vladimir Putin. Moscow's strongman of the post-Cold War era, or at least some assigned wordsmith, wrote an op-ed piece in the New York Times making a clever pitch for taking the dispute to the United Nations, where an anticipated Russian veto had deterred the United States from doing so in the first place.
NEWS
By Claude Berube | September 16, 2013
Recent satellite imagery suggests that North Korea has greatly expanded its uranium enrichment capabilities. The nation just promised to launch more long-range rockets "soon. " And, reportedly, labs in Pyongyang are hard at work developing nuclear-armed missiles capable of striking the U.S. mainland. With the North Korean threat apparently mounting, it's essential for the United States to continue investing in missile defense. Missile shield technologies first gained attention in 1983 when President Ronald Reagan proposed a bold endeavor called the Strategic Defense Initiative.
NEWS
September 11, 2013
The debate on Syria is much too limited ("Syrian rebels ready to strike if U.S. does," Sept. 6). It should not be about military effectiveness, national interest, or building coalitions. The more relevant question is why, after 6,000 years of civilization with extraordinary advances in technology, human rights, education, health and quality of life, when another nation acts badly the best we can come up with is to drop explosives on him? Really? We are back to the Stone Age and only the sophistication of the weapons has changed.
NEWS
By Andrea Siegel, Jon Meoli and Alison Knezevich, Baltimore Sun Media Group | May 28, 2013
The explosion blasted out the windows at Shepherd Electric Supply as pieces of the ceiling rained down and the building groaned. Roger Sampson, an employee, had lived in earthquake-prone Los Angeles for eight years and felt a quake shake Maryland two years ago. But Tuesday afternoon, when a freight train and a truck carrying garbage collided in Rosedale just blocks from the warehouse, was different. Workers in the building in the 7400 block of Pulaski Highway were shaking with fear, Sampson said, and he saw a few of his co-workers bleeding, one from the neck, after being hit by glass.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2001
The missile launchers that Lockheed Martin builds in Middle River will fire almost anything. You can throw in an anti-submarine rocket, a little Sea Sparrow, one of those new SM-4 land attack missiles, it doesn't matter. The MK-41 will light it off. Now the engineers on Eastern Boulevard hope to prove they can not only launch anything, but they also can launch anywhere - specifically, underwater. Lockheed Martin's Marine Systems unit, manufacturer of the premier missile launching system for the U.S. Navy's surface ships, is trying to convince the Pentagon that it knows how to fire missiles from submarines as well.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 21, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Lockheed Martin Corp.'s Trident II nuclear missile survived an effort yesterday by a Minnesota Congressman to end its production.During debate on its version of the defense budget for fiscal 1998, the House of Representatives rejected an amendment from Minnesota Democrat Rep. William Luther that would remove $309.1 million in the bill for seven of the Trident II submarine-launched intercontinental ballistic missiles.Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin, America's largest aerospace company, makes the missiles in Sunnyvale, Calif.
EXPLORE
By Janene Holzberg | March 21, 2013
“The combat system is the brain that helps you fire 'the bullet,' which is actually an extremely complex missile,” Danielle Hilliard says of her highly technical job in air and missile defense. She uses simple visual images to demystify her job as a rocket scientist working on ballistic missiles in APL's Space Department. As a program manager, the 41-year-old Clarksville resident has a dual role that requires her to work internally and externally. She communicates with engineers,  works across APL departments and with partners at such institutions as MIT and Penn State.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
If there is anything positive to come out of sequestration, maybe it will motivate us to take a good long look at what we spend on our military. Sixty percent of the 2013 discretionary budget proposed by President Barack Obama goes to the military including war, veterans and nuclear weapons programs. Again, that's 60 percent! In terms of dollars, it is $2.2 million every minute of the year. Presently, the U.S. Navy has 10 super carriers (with two more under construction and another in the planning stages)
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