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By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 19, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Two military tests in widely separated deserts, one a chilling success and the other a persistent failure, have contributed the latest evidence to both sides of a recurring 15-year-old debate: Should the United States deploy a high-tech umbrella of killer satellites that will shield the states from incoming ballistic missiles?Ever since Ronald Reagan advanced the Strategic Defense Initiative, a proposal for a space-based national missile-defense program that was dubbed "star wars," the question has alternated between the political wings and center stage every few years, catching the imagination of lawmakers, think tanks and presidential hopefuls.
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NEWS
By Claude Berube | September 16, 2013
Recent satellite imagery suggests that North Korea has greatly expanded its uranium enrichment capabilities. The nation just promised to launch more long-range rockets "soon. " And, reportedly, labs in Pyongyang are hard at work developing nuclear-armed missiles capable of striking the U.S. mainland. With the North Korean threat apparently mounting, it's essential for the United States to continue investing in missile defense. Missile shield technologies first gained attention in 1983 when President Ronald Reagan proposed a bold endeavor called the Strategic Defense Initiative.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 23, 2001
MOSCOW - Undersecretary of State John Bolton said last night that "a vast open space" still exists for an agreement with Russia on joint development of a limited defense against ballistic missiles, but that the time for such an accord is running out. Bolton denied, however, that he had issued an unofficial deadline of November for reaching such an agreement. The New York Times reported yesterday, based on excerpts from an interview with a Moscow radio station, that Bolton had indicated the United States would declare its intention to withdraw from the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty unless Russia agreed to changes by November.
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By Janene Holzberg | March 21, 2013
“The combat system is the brain that helps you fire 'the bullet,' which is actually an extremely complex missile,” Danielle Hilliard says of her highly technical job in air and missile defense. She uses simple visual images to demystify her job as a rocket scientist working on ballistic missiles in APL's Space Department. As a program manager, the 41-year-old Clarksville resident has a dual role that requires her to work internally and externally. She communicates with engineers,  works across APL departments and with partners at such institutions as MIT and Penn State.
NEWS
By Claude Berube | September 16, 2013
Recent satellite imagery suggests that North Korea has greatly expanded its uranium enrichment capabilities. The nation just promised to launch more long-range rockets "soon. " And, reportedly, labs in Pyongyang are hard at work developing nuclear-armed missiles capable of striking the U.S. mainland. With the North Korean threat apparently mounting, it's essential for the United States to continue investing in missile defense. Missile shield technologies first gained attention in 1983 when President Ronald Reagan proposed a bold endeavor called the Strategic Defense Initiative.
NEWS
By Thomas A. Halsted | August 24, 2001
FOR YEARS, the Pentagon and its Ballistic Missile Defense Organization have engaged in a continuing effort to delude the public and Congress into believing the United States is well on its way to developing a workable defense against ballistic missiles. Unfortunately, gullible news media have unwittingly played along. Now the truth is coming out. Last week, Air Force Lt. Gen. Ronald T. Kadish, director of the missile-test organization, acknowledged that we don't yet know how to hit a missile with another missile, let alone distinguish enemy warheads from decoys without radio aids.
NEWS
November 3, 1991
In the process of trying to devise a coherent missile defense strategy, House conferees had much the better case than their Senate negotiating partners in shaping the new $291 billion Pentagon budget. Spurred by the perceived (though debatable) success of Patriot missiles in shooting down Iraqi Scuds, conferees have agreed to accelerate development of so-called "theater" missile defenses to deal with Saddam-style threats in the future.From there, however, the arcane debate over advanced weaponry ends in scrambled distinctions between systems that can be deployed where Third World conflict occurs and systems to defend U.S. territory against various kinds of strategic or intercontinental attack: a massive Soviet first strike, an unauthorized or accidental launch from a former Soviet republic, an attack from one of the lesser nuclear powers of the future or a terrorist raid from any number of conceivable sources.
NEWS
By Michael T. Klare | September 13, 2001
AMHERST, Mass. - Almost every aspect of U.S. military policy is likely to be affected by Tuesday's terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, but one that is certain to come under intense scrutiny is the Bush administration's plan for a national missile defense (NMD). In particular, President Bush's claim that NMD represents the single most important priority for U.S. "homeland" defense is bound to appear highly dubious in light of the apparent success of a still-unidentified terrorist network in causing massive damage to major U.S. institutions and facilities.
NEWS
By Christopher Madison | December 12, 2001
WASHINGTON -- When the Pentagon's "kill vehicle" slammed into a mock warhead 140 miles over the Pacific Ocean in a recent test, the Bush administration and the defense contractors cheered: National missile defense was one step closer to fruition. They should have held their applause. This was only the fifth out of at least 20 highly controlled tests that will be conducted even before realistic conditions are introduced. The reality is that President Bush, even if he serves two terms, will likely be retired before any missile defense system is ready to be deployed, assuming it works.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | July 27, 2001
WASHINGTON - I sure welcome the news that the Bush team will open missile talks with Russia, because it might bring some clarity to the Bushies' arguments on missile defense, which have been at best incoherent and at worst dishonest. Look at Republican arms expert Richard Perle's Senate testimony last week. He was trying to justify why we need missile defense against rogue leaders, who, he claimed, cannot be deterred by the classic doctrine of mutual assured destruction (MAD), which has kept the peace for 50 years.
NEWS
December 10, 2012
While many have persuasively argued that the fiscal cliff defense cuts would hurt innovation and slow our economic recovery, few offer concrete examples of how these catastrophic cuts would endanger our national security. Iran's drive to acquire nuclear weapons provides the perfect example. Intent on testing America's resolve to stop its nuclear program, Iran will accelerate its uranium enrichment if the U.S. cannot credibly threaten to use military force. Cutting warships, fighter jets, intelligence technologies, and other critical capabilities - as would happen if we go over the fiscal cliff - would encourage Iran to run out the diplomatic clock until it has built a nuclear ballistic missile.
NEWS
November 28, 2012
During his campaign for re-election, Rep. Chris Van Hollen from Maryland's 8th District claimed that he was a "friend of Israel. " He even took out a full-page ad in the Washington Jewish Weekly just a few days before the Nov. 6 election claiming that he always stood in strong support of Israel. Mr. Van Hollen also claimed he supported the Iron Dome missile defense system that the Israelis used with great success to shoot down an Iranian-made Fajr-5 missile that was launched against Tel Aviv by Hamas and Hezbollah out of Gaza.
NEWS
January 13, 2012
While President Barack Obama's recently announced defense cuts will spare critical intelligence and cyber warfare capabilities provided by many Maryland companies, all military programs are still threatened by the "sequestration" clause of the debt ceiling deal which would cut $500 billion by slashing across every single Pentagon program. On the chopping block would be essential military equipment like intelligence satellites that track terrorist activities, fighter jets to provide air support for our troops, and missile defenses to protect us from nuclear ballistic missile attack.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2011
Alvin Ralph Eaton, a pioneer in modern guided missile systems and the longest-serving employee at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, died of cancer Oct. 20. He was 91 and lived in Clarksville. Mr. Eaton's 66-year career coincided with — and he contributed to — historic developments in U.S. missile defense. He corrected flight problems in the first supersonic surface-to-air missiles, developed a widely used tail-control system for supersonic interceptor missiles, and helped shepherd the Patriot anti-missile program in the 1980s.
NEWS
September 27, 2011
The news from the European Institute for Particle Physics is that Albert Einstein may have been wrong ("Faster than light", Sept. 23). The speed of light may not be insurmountable, and everything we think we know about the universe may be wrong. Of course, we have no more idea of what it will mean to future generations than the first readers of Einstein's theories did. Did physicists 100 years ago envision nuclear medicine, atomic power, deep space travel or any of the thousand other ideas and inventions that grew directly or indirectly from Einstein's work?
NEWS
December 30, 2010
The hurdles the Obama administration had to overcome in getting the New Start treaty ratified by the Senate this month could seem like child's play compared to what's ahead for the president as he seeks to implement the next phase of his arms control agenda. Where New Start built upon previous agreements aimed at reducing the overall number of U.S. and Russian long-range strategic nuclear weapons, future talks will focus on a trio of thorny issues — short-range tactical nukes, missile defense and a ban on underground nuclear testing — that have eluded arms control negotiators for decades.
NEWS
By Derek Chollet | May 14, 2001
BERLIN -- Europe's reaction to President Bush's plans to build a missile defense has been remarkably positive even though the allies have bitterly criticized his administration for acting unilaterally and pursuing policies that are unnecessarily aggressive. This is a change from less than two years ago when the Clinton administration briefed the same European allies about its proposal for a missile defense -- a system that was far less ambitious than the one Mr. Bush envisions. The Europeans then were apoplectic.
NEWS
By Stephen D. McCool | June 4, 2001
THE DRIVING premise behind President Bush's proposed missile defense shield is either flawed or concealed. If the premise is flawed, the lack of clear thinking in the White House and Pentagon is a far greater threat to our national security than any nuclear warhead could ever be. If the driving premise is being concealed, the president and his generals may be willing participants in the fraudulent misuse of public funds on a grand scale. The first case (flawed premise) is the most disturbing of the two because it suggests that the people entrusted with providing for the common defense are not making accurate assessments of the potential threats the nation faces.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 7, 2008
SOCHI, Russia -- President Bush and Russian President Vladimir V. Putin failed yesterday to overcome their greatest conflicts on a missile defense system the United States plans to build in Central Europe but narrowed the difference over one key element. The two presidents presented divergent assessments after spending nearly five hours together this weekend, with Bush expressing optimism that Russia was relaxing its opposition to the missile shield and Putin presenting a clear view of his objections and the obstacles in its way. "It is a significant breakthrough," said Bush, focusing on Russia's willingness to work on the missile shield in a partnership with the U.S. and its European allies.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 19, 2008
MOSCOW -- Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates wrapped up talks with Russian leaders yesterday without any Kremlin commitment to drop opposition to U.S. plans for a missile defense system in Eastern Europe. But unlike their last visit here, there were no lectures from the Russian side and no threats, a sign that relations between Washington and Moscow are warming after a long, deep chill. A tone of measured amicability pervaded over their two-day visit to Moscow that included talks with Russian President Vladimir V. Putin, President-elect Dmitry Medvedev, Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and Defense Minister Anatoly Serdyukov.
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