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By New York Times | March 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- When Israel was attacked by Iraqi missiles on Jan. 18, Israeli leaders informed Washington that they planned to retaliate with a large air and land operation into western Iraq to wipe out the missile launchers, administration officials say.The Israeli plan was kept on hold for weeks and ultimately abandoned as Bush administration officials pressed Israel to stay out of the war.It called for an Israeli armed sweep through western Iraq by...
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NEWS
December 3, 2012
I was disturbed by a recent letter to the editor questioning Rep. Chris Van Hollen's support for Israel ("Van Hollen is not a true friend to Israel," Nov. 28). I am a Jewish constituent of the congressman who has followed his career for many years. Mr. Van Hollen's diligence and support of causes close to my heart, including promoting the important U.S. strategic military alliance with Israel, has convinced me that he is indeed a friend of Israel. During the recent election campaign, I was present at a number of events at which Mr. Van Hollen's opponents mischaracterized him as an enemy of Israel.
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NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | January 27, 1991
BERLIN -- In possibly the largest peace demonstrations in post-war Germany, nearly 500,000 people across the country demonstrated yesterday against the gulf war.The demonstrations, called to coincide with protests in Washington, turned out to be far larger than expected and provided an opportunity for the newly reborn German peace movement to counter claims that it is anti-American and unsupportive of Israel.Speakers criticized the war but laid the blame on Saddam Hussein and pledged solidarity with Israel.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,Los Angeles Times | November 23, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - A U.S. missile strike may have killed a Pakistani-British man who was implicated in a plot to blow up trans-Atlantic airliners, Pakistani intelligence officials said yesterday. Rashid Rauf, who has been a fugitive since escaping from Pakistani custody in December, was thought to have been among five militants killed in the strike near the Afghan border, the officials said. Pakistani news media also reported the death, citing security sources. Pakistan's government confirmed that Rauf and a Saudi militant called Abu Zubair al-Masri were the apparent targets of the missile in North Waziristan in the tribal region that lies next to Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,Los Angeles Times | November 23, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - A U.S. missile strike may have killed a Pakistani-British man who was implicated in a plot to blow up trans-Atlantic airliners, Pakistani intelligence officials said yesterday. Rashid Rauf, who has been a fugitive since escaping from Pakistani custody in December, was thought to have been among five militants killed in the strike near the Afghan border, the officials said. Pakistani news media also reported the death, citing security sources. Pakistan's government confirmed that Rauf and a Saudi militant called Abu Zubair al-Masri were the apparent targets of the missile in North Waziristan in the tribal region that lies next to Afghanistan.
NEWS
September 10, 1996
SADDAM HUSSEIN's success in regaining effective control of the Kurdish region of northern Iraq easily exceeds any gains the United States may have made in extending its southern no-fly zone and attacking Iraqi air defense installations. While President Clinton was quick -- perhaps too quick -- to call last week's U.S. response a success, he now faces the fact that the Iraqi dictator is again an effective trouble-maker in the world's most abundant oil-producing region.The U.S. effort after the end of the gulf war to protect the Kurdish population of northern Iraq has turned into a fiasco.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 21, 1991
MANAMA, Bahrain -- For the first time in more than 40 years, the people of Israel are getting a sympathetic hearing in the Arab world following Iraq's missile attacks on the Jewish state."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 5, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Despite two days of U.S. missile attacks against Iraqi air defenses, Saddam Hussein remains entrenched and continues to pose a serious threat to the region that supplies most of the Western world's oil, outside experts said yesterday."
NEWS
December 3, 2012
I was disturbed by a recent letter to the editor questioning Rep. Chris Van Hollen's support for Israel ("Van Hollen is not a true friend to Israel," Nov. 28). I am a Jewish constituent of the congressman who has followed his career for many years. Mr. Van Hollen's diligence and support of causes close to my heart, including promoting the important U.S. strategic military alliance with Israel, has convinced me that he is indeed a friend of Israel. During the recent election campaign, I was present at a number of events at which Mr. Van Hollen's opponents mischaracterized him as an enemy of Israel.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 14, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Over the past two weeks, Saddam Hussein has flaunted anew his ability to command the attention of a superpower at his own whim.President Clinton's dispatch of 5,000 troops, a second aircraft carrier, eight F-117A stealth fighter-bombers, four B-52 bombers and two Patriot anti-missile units to the region testify to the continuing cost to the American taxpayer of containing Iraqi aggression.But Hussein has used the past two weeks to make tangible gains as well.He has regained control over much of Kurdish territory in northern Iraq and exposed deep divisions in the coalition that formed to oust his troops from Kuwait 5 1/2 years ago."
NEWS
By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Molly Hennessy-Fiske,Los Angeles Times | July 22, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- A U.S. military missile attack on insurgents in a town north of the capital left six insurgents dead and five wounded yesterday, officials said. But witnesses in Husseiniya, about 20 miles north of Baghdad, said U.S. helicopters attacked three houses during a four-hour period, killing at least 18 people, including women and children. They said about 21 people were wounded in the attacks, which leveled the buildings. Meanwhile, Iraq's prime minister urged parliament to cancel or shorten its summer vacation to pass laws Washington considers crucial to Iraq's stability and the debate on how long U.S. forces should remain.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | June 14, 2006
JERUSALEM -- An Israeli aircraft launched missiles at a van carrying Palestinian militants in the Gaza Strip en route to launch rockets at Israel yesterday, killing 10 people, including three medical workers and two children who had raced to the scene of the initial explosion. Israeli military officials, meanwhile, denied that Israel was involved in the deadly explosion on a Gaza beach on Friday that killed eight people, concluding after a detailed investigation that the blast was most likely caused by a mine planted by Hamas militants and not an Israeli shell.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 8, 2004
JERUSALEM - Reviving a much-criticized tactic, Israel killed a Palestinian militant leader yesterday by incinerating his car with a helicopter-fired missile in the middle of a crowded Gaza City street. A passing 12-year-old Palestinian schoolboy was killed and 10 other Palestinians wounded in the midday raid, according to Palestinian hospital authorities. The Israeli army said the target of the attack - the first of its kind in six weeks - was Aziz Mahmoud Shami, a senior local field commander in the military wing of Islamic Jihad.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 2003
WASHINGTON - With two recent attacks on big airplanes leaving Baghdad International Airport in Iraq, experts on civilian aviation are debating how civilian airliners outside the battle zones could be protected from shoulder-fired missiles. The Department of Homeland Security is planning to announce soon that it has selected two or three teams of bidders to explore how to put military-style anti-missile technology on airliners. But airline experts have been questioning whether onboard systems are adequate.
NEWS
By Alissa J. Rubin and Alissa J. Rubin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 3, 2003
HUWAYSA, Iraq - Resistance fighters used a shoulder-fired missile to bring down a U.S. Chinook helicopter in the barley and wheat fields just west of the Euphrates River here yesterday, witnesses said, killing 16 soldiers and injuring 20 in the deadliest attack on American forces since they entered Iraq in March. The helicopter was ferrying troops attached to the 82nd Airborne Division to Baghdad's international airport, where they were scheduled to fly home or to rest-and-recuperation breaks outside Iraq.
NEWS
By Joel Greenberg and Joel Greenberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 13, 2003
JERUSALEM - Pressing what a security official called an all-out campaign against the militant group Hamas, Israeli forces carried out their third airborne attack in 24 hours in the Gaza Strip yesterday, killing seven Palestinians - including a Hamas fugitive, his wife and 3-year-old daughter - in a helicopter missile strike. The attack, along with the killing of an Israeli by Palestinian gunmen in a drive-by shooting in the West Bank, were the latest deadly assaults in a surge of violence that has imperiled a U.S.-backed "road map" to peace launched at a Middle East summit last week.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 21, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The attacks unleashed by the United States yesterday were achieved with scores of Navy missiles -- each weighing 2,650 pounds and with a range of 1,000 miles -- fired from ships in the Arabian Sea and Red Sea, government sources said.Defense officials provided few details of the strikes. But government sources, speaking on condition of anonymity, said yesterday it was exclusively a Navy effort that involved 75 to 100 cruise missiles and no aircraft.The simultaneous missile attacks, which began about 1: 30 p.m. EDT, targeted alleged terrorist training sites in a remote region of Afghanistan south of Kabul, and an alleged chemical weapons site in an industrial area south of Khartoum, Sudan.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 29, 1991
TEL AVIV, Israel -- The routine of nighttime missile attacks has changed the face of this once-vibrant metropolis to that of a city under siege.By day it assumes an appearance of normalcy: Work has resumed, schools are slowly reopening, and shops fill with customers for shortened daytime hours.But the night belongs to the air raid siren. The roads out of Tel Aviv are snarled with residents fleeing to Jerusalem or safer outlying areas. Whole city neighborhoods are dark. Restaurants and nightclubs are locked, their windows crossed with tape against a missile blast.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 19, 2003
TEL AVIV, Israel - The missiles, made of cardboard and plastic, stood in Rabin Square and posed no danger to anyone. So people crowded around and painted them - an exercise intended to ease fears about a repeat of the events of the first Persian Gulf war, when this city and its suburbs were struck by 39 Iraqi Scuds. Yesterday, when the Israeli army for the first time ordered citizens to prepare sealed rooms to guard against a chemical attack from Iraq, Eli Stempler took his frightened 9-year-old daughter to Rabin Square and let her loose with a paintbrush.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 29, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Clinton administration officials confirmed yesterday that they have presented Moscow with a draft agreement allowing both the United States and Russia to deploy limited defenses against missile attacks. The disclosure caused a flurry in Washington. A written proposal in the hands of the Russians suggests that President Clinton will push hard to amend a key arms-control treaty before he leaves office, disregarding those who believe he should leave negotiations to the next president.
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