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NEWS
February 26, 2007
WINNERS AWARD LIST, PG 6D BEST PICTURE / / "The Departed" BEST DIRECTOR / / Martin Scorsese, "The Departed" BEST ACTOR / / Forest Whitaker, "The Last King of Scotland" BEST ACTRESS / / Helen Mirren, "The Queen" Style takes center stage In a sea of haute couture, several definitive trends emerge, though "Little Miss Sunshine" starlet Abigail Breslin steals the show. PG 1D A diverse field "The Departed" leads with four Oscars; "Pan's Labyrinth" takes home three; and "Little Miss Sunshine," "Dreamgirls" and "An Inconvenient Truth" win two each.
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NEWS
November 12, 2013
Ever since the pop-punk band All Time Low was founded by three Dulaney High students, lead guitarist Jack Barakat has been a teen heartthrob. Now one teenage girl might be able to claim she is close with the musician: Abigail Breslin, who came to fame as the star of the 2006 film "Little Miss Sunshine. " According to US Magazine, Breslin, 17, and Barakat, 25, cozied up last week at the premiere of "Ender's Game," the recently released sci-fi film in which Breslin plays a supporting role.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 11, 2006
Little Miss Sunshine gives the term "crowd-pleaser" an upgrade. This picture earns every laugh it gets with actual emotion. It's about the way families live now, sutured together from more than one marriage, struggling for stability when each member has vastly different needs. The acting, the direction and the writing bring it the warmth as well as the madness of a crazy quilt. Though the presence of master farceurs Steve Carell and Greg Kinnear makes audiences want to start laughing once the title appears, the movie provides a delicate balance between pathos and humor, then turns into a delicious, daring farce about the human comedy.
EXPLORE
June 8, 2011
In recent Bel Air Women's Summer Lacrosse League action, Little Miss Sunshine knocked off the Black Magic team 12-6, while Save the Ta-Ta's was able to pull out a narrow 8-7 defeat of the Blue Moon team. Playing on Thursday afternoon, Little Miss Sunshine used a big first-half offensive push to grab the victory, outscoring the Black Magic squad 7-2 in the opening frame. In the second half, the two squads were a bit more even, with Black Magic posting four goals, while the winners netted five.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 27, 2007
A year ago, Fox Searchlight's celebrated July-August release was Little Miss Sunshine, a blast of humanity powered by the spluttering engine of a battered old VW van. Now the company is rolling out Sunshine, and unlike its predecessor, it's one big miss. Little Miss Sunshine made you feel part of a group quest as you traveled the distance between New Mexico and Southern California with a family of misfits; Sunshine freezes you out as you journey with a handful of scientists and astronauts from Earth to the sun. Set a half-century from now, Danny Boyle's spectacle about a mission to reignite our ailing star and save the planet is one of those high-style, highbrow science-fiction experiments that draws today's top directors the way Westerns did once upon a time.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | July 27, 2007
One should have reservations about No Reservations, a romantic comedy that does precious little with the considerable resources at its disposal. Those resources include a pair of actresses - the formidable Catherine Zeta-Jones, lovely and commanding as ever, and the effortlessly charming Abigail Breslin, fresh off last year's Oscar nomination for Little Miss Sunshine - who alone should make any movie worth the price of admission. That they don't isn't so much their fault as it is the people behind the camera, who are far too happy to follow well-trod cinematic paths when they could at least stretch the genre's boundaries.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | August 25, 2006
Quirky, sweet-and-sour American comedies often become contemporary classics when they bring wit and humanity to settings too often merely caricatured, like teen beauty pageants in Smile (1974) and a fundamentalist-Christian high school in Saved! (2004). Little Miss Sunshine, the hit indie comedy of the summer, has links to both films. Like them, it's a tangy slice of dark Americana. But its final act unfolds in a setting even riskier for comedy or drama, especially these days: the Little Miss Sunshine contest, a prepubescent beauty pageant.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach and Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critics | September 22, 2006
Capsules by Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach. Full reviews at baltimoresun.com/movies. The Black Dahlia -- stars Aaron Eckhart and Josh Hartnett as top cops trying to solve the instantly infamous case of a would-be starlet whose murder seemed to sum up the sick soul of post-World War II L.A. (M.S.) R 121 minutes B- Everyone's Hero -- Young children - especially baseball fans - doubtless will enjoy the animated adventures of a young boy who tries to reunite Babe Ruth with his bat so the Yankees can win the 1932 World Series.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank Lovece and Frank Lovece,Newsday | January 11, 2007
Alan Arkin is the male Meryl Streep. He does accents (The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming) and ethnicities (Popi), has played a deaf person (The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter), is adept at both comedy (The In-Laws) and drama (Glengarry Glen Ross), can sing (he started his career with the folk group the Tarriers) and collects accolades the way some actors collect residuals (a Tony Award for Enter Laughing, a Golden Globe for The Russians ..., four Emmy nominations and two Oscar nominations)
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE COLUMNIST | August 11, 2006
WASHINGTON--Critics usually view MTV as the scourge of movies because its influence has spread flashy editing and splashy colors for their own sake and a reckless disregard for lucid and cohesive storytelling. But Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris, who came to MTV in the early 1980s, when they were fresh out of UCLA and the music channel was just getting rolling, represent MTV at its best and brightest. In 1983, they saw the chance to do The Cutting Edge, an interview and documentary-based MTV series, as a grand experimental opportunity, and then moved on to craft videos that explored with sympathy, nuance and imagination the visual components of performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
The "Toy Story" trilogy is a primal suburban growing-up story. The movie's screenwriter, Michael Arndt, whose father was in the foreign service, grew up in the suburbs of Northern Virginia. "We moved there when I was 4 or 5 years old, then went to Sri Lanka for two years; then I went to junior high and high school in McLean, right near the Potomac River. To paraphrase Sarah Palin, 'We could see Maryland from our front porch!' " Now Arndt may become the first screenwriter to go two for two at the Oscars.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 4, 2009
Tim Suhrstedt, born and bred in Catonsville, has the rare distinction of having shot two prominent pictures opening nationally the same day. "All About Steve" and "Extract" are farces, reflecting Suhrstedt's status as one of the go-to guys in movie comedy. But when he attended Catonsville High, he never thought he'd become a top Los Angeles-based cameraman, let alone one with an industrywide reputation for making comedy work visually. It was only when he crafted a Super 8 mm short for a cinema appreciation course at Lehigh University that Suhrstedt developed a case of the film bug. He went to work at Maryland Public Television when it still had a unit that shot on 16 mm film.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 27, 2007
A year ago, Fox Searchlight's celebrated July-August release was Little Miss Sunshine, a blast of humanity powered by the spluttering engine of a battered old VW van. Now the company is rolling out Sunshine, and unlike its predecessor, it's one big miss. Little Miss Sunshine made you feel part of a group quest as you traveled the distance between New Mexico and Southern California with a family of misfits; Sunshine freezes you out as you journey with a handful of scientists and astronauts from Earth to the sun. Set a half-century from now, Danny Boyle's spectacle about a mission to reignite our ailing star and save the planet is one of those high-style, highbrow science-fiction experiments that draws today's top directors the way Westerns did once upon a time.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | July 27, 2007
One should have reservations about No Reservations, a romantic comedy that does precious little with the considerable resources at its disposal. Those resources include a pair of actresses - the formidable Catherine Zeta-Jones, lovely and commanding as ever, and the effortlessly charming Abigail Breslin, fresh off last year's Oscar nomination for Little Miss Sunshine - who alone should make any movie worth the price of admission. That they don't isn't so much their fault as it is the people behind the camera, who are far too happy to follow well-trod cinematic paths when they could at least stretch the genre's boundaries.
NEWS
February 26, 2007
WINNERS AWARD LIST, PG 6D BEST PICTURE / / "The Departed" BEST DIRECTOR / / Martin Scorsese, "The Departed" BEST ACTOR / / Forest Whitaker, "The Last King of Scotland" BEST ACTRESS / / Helen Mirren, "The Queen" Style takes center stage In a sea of haute couture, several definitive trends emerge, though "Little Miss Sunshine" starlet Abigail Breslin steals the show. PG 1D A diverse field "The Departed" leads with four Oscars; "Pan's Labyrinth" takes home three; and "Little Miss Sunshine," "Dreamgirls" and "An Inconvenient Truth" win two each.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | February 25, 2007
SANTA MONICA, Calif. -- Proving that comedies can win big in Hollywood, Little Miss Sunshine dominated yesterday's Spirit Awards, walking away with four of the honors given annually for smaller-budget movies made outside the Hollywood mainstream. The movie, which will also be up for the big prize at tonight's Oscars, won Spirits for best picture, best director (the husband-and-wife team of Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris), best supporting male (Alan Arkin) and best first screenplay (Michael Arndt)
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | February 25, 2007
SANTA MONICA, Calif. -- Proving that comedies can win big in Hollywood, Little Miss Sunshine dominated yesterday's Spirit Awards, walking away with four of the honors given annually for smaller-budget movies made outside the Hollywood mainstream. The movie, which will also be up for the big prize at tonight's Oscars, won Spirits for best picture, best director (the husband-and-wife team of Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris), best supporting male (Alan Arkin) and best first screenplay (Michael Arndt)
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 24, 2007
An African-American actor nominated for his portrayal of a Ugandan madman. A best-picture category that includes a movie filmed in Berber, Arabic, Spanish and Japanese (and another shot almost exclusively in Japanese). A Mexican director whose work could win seven awards. After frequently being dubbed too-white and too-clubby, the Oscars this year enthusiastically embraced diversity: The list of nominees for the 79th Academy Awards, announced yesterday, is the most diverse in its history.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 24, 2007
An African-American actor nominated for his portrayal of a Ugandan madman. A best-picture category that includes a movie filmed in Berber, Arabic, Spanish and Japanese (and another shot almost exclusively in Japanese). A Mexican director whose work could win seven awards. After frequently being dubbed too-white and too-clubby, the Oscars this year enthusiastically embraced diversity: The list of nominees for the 79th Academy Awards, announced yesterday, is the most diverse in its history.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank Lovece and Frank Lovece,Newsday | January 11, 2007
Alan Arkin is the male Meryl Streep. He does accents (The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming) and ethnicities (Popi), has played a deaf person (The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter), is adept at both comedy (The In-Laws) and drama (Glengarry Glen Ross), can sing (he started his career with the folk group the Tarriers) and collects accolades the way some actors collect residuals (a Tony Award for Enter Laughing, a Golden Globe for The Russians ..., four Emmy nominations and two Oscar nominations)
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