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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | January 21, 1994
FREDERICK -- Helen Smith marks a century of life today, and, before a host of community officials and fans honor her at a luncheon at Hood College, the venerable woman will begin her day as she always does: painting in her home studio.By anyone's account, she has lived an extraordinary life for a woman born 100 years ago on a Frederick County farm -- and still works in the same vicinity."It doesn't seem believable -- imagine 100 years old," Miss Smith reflected the other day as she sat in the parlor of her 1870s-vintage home.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
The Navy men's basketball team's 67-42 loss to Virginia Tuesday night was a showcase for two players moving in opposite directions. Junior shooting guard Brandon Venturini led the Midshipmen (2-3) with 15 points, including four three-pointers. He has scored at least 10 points in his last four contests and leads the team in scoring with 10.8 points per game. Venturini, who averaged 8.8 points per game and shot 34.7 percent (101-of-291) from the floor last season, is converting 45.7 percent (21-of-46)
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2001
Bobbi Smith, a choreographer who taught scores of children to dance, died Monday of pancreatic cancer at her Edgewater home. She was 60. Miss Smith founded the Talent Machine Company, an Annapolis youth troupe. She also taught dance to students at Stageworkz, a Millersville studio she operated with her sister, and at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts in Annapolis. She was remembered for her exuberance and high professional standards. She often urged students to "Catch the energy."
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec | September 15, 2011
Ravens wide receiver Lee Evans, who was sidelined yesterday with a left ankle injury, was a full participant in today's practice. Evans vows to play Sunday against the Tennessee Titans at LP Field.  However, cornerbacks Chris Carr (thigh/hamstring) and Jimmy Smith (ankle), and guard Ben Grubbs (toe) did not practice. Smith is expected to miss a "few weeks" with a high left ankle sprain. For the Titans, defensive end William Hayes (shoulder), safety Chris Hope (shoulder) and wide receiver/kick returner Damian Williams (hamstring)
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | April 23, 1995
Blandair seems a forgotten place.Vines curl around the old mansion's red bricks and its black-shuttered windows. Its once-proud white portico sags to one side on rotted timbers above a vine-choked front door.The home of 81-year-old recluse Elizabeth C. "Nancy" Smith -- on 300 acres of undeveloped land near the heart of Columbia -- is the subject of intense disagreement between county officials and preservationists about how best to protect the parcel from development.Suspicious of government and conservation groups alike, Miss Smith, who still lives at Blandair, adamantly refuses to make any public arrangements with either of them to preserve the land when she dies.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2001
Virginia W. Smith, retired chief executive officer and president of Union National Bank in Westminster, died Sunday of cancer at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. She was 51 and lived in Stevenson. Miss Smith, who was known as Jenny, headed the Carroll County bank for five years until retiring last year because of failing health. The bank, which has been a Westminster institution since its founding in 1816, is 21 years older than Carroll County. When appointed president of Union National in 1995, she was one of four women in the state to lead a bank.
NEWS
June 1, 1996
Esther Cordelia Smith, 96, who retired in 1970 as chairman of the dramatic arts department at Western Maryland College after a 44-year career, will be remembered at a memorial service at 1: 30 p.m. tomorrow in the Westminster college's Baker Chapel.Miss Smith died of heart failure Jan. 18 at a retirement home in Tiger, Ga.She was born and raised in Jasper, Fla., and moved to Clayton, Ga., where she graduated from high school.She came to Baltimore in 1924 to study at the Bard-Avon School of Expression and later attended Yale University, the University of Southern California and the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York City.
NEWS
By Harold Jackson | August 16, 1998
THE NAMES are familiar. You see them whenever you drive around Columbia -- Brunners Run Court, Sewells Orchard Drive, Vollmerhausen Road, Dasher Green Elementary School.These names weren't picked out of thin air, the way some street monikers in Columbia seem to have been. They recognize the farms that were sold to make way for Jim Rouse's planned city.The Vollmerhausen family owned a 140-acre farm on what is now commercial property on Gerwig Lane and Berger Road. Brothers George and Irving Dasher had a 680-acre cattle and grain farm off Oakland Mills Road.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Dana Hedgpeth contributed to this article | July 2, 1998
Though the chances of winning may be slim, a private foundation has filed a lawsuit to halt the sale of the 300-acre Smith farm, the last swath of rural land in Columbia.The suit, filed Monday in Howard Circuit Court, states that Elizabeth C. "Nancy" Smith, an eccentric who died in 1997, wanted to "preserve her land" forever and had no intention to sell the property to private developers or Howard County.County officials, who have been negotiating with Smith's heirs to buy the farm, have expressed interest in creating an athletic complex there.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Donna Weaver and Kris Antonelli and Donna Weaver,Staff Writers | July 31, 1992
A 17-year-old Glen Burnie High School student died yesterday morning in a Brooklyn apartment after inhaling butane fumes from a can, Baltimore City police said.Nichelle Nicole Preston, of the 1800 block of Saunders Way in Harundale, was pronounced dead of cardiac arrest at Harbor Hospital Center shortly after 1 a.m., police and hospital officials said.The police report said that Miss Preston was spending the night at a friend's home in the 1100 block of Cambria St. when she inhaled the fumes.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2011
Carmelia Hicks' favorite grade-school teacher, Julia T. Smith, was a kindly human being, but she kept a thick paddle in her desk drawer and was never afraid to use it. The way Hicks remembers it, Miss Smith had plenty of backup. "If you acted up, she sent you to the principal's office. Miss [Alice] Battle, the principal, had an even thicker paddle. Then they'd call your parents, and when you got home, you'd get another beating," Hicks says of the mid-1960s, when she was a student at the Lula G. Scott Elementary School in Shady Side.
NEWS
December 16, 2001
Coming to the defense of Nancy Smith, Blandair As one who knew Nancy Smith for 28 years and who worked with her on plans to preserve Blandair Farm for 14 of those years, I would like to set the record straight by answering the letter from John McGing ("Nancy Smith to blame for Blandair's problems," Dec. 9). Until her mother's death in 1979, Miss Smith thought the farm would be preserved by being tied up in her father's life estate. When she realized the life estate would not provide the protection she required, she began looking for other means.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2001
Virginia W. Smith, retired chief executive officer and president of Union National Bank in Westminster, died Sunday of cancer at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. She was 51 and lived in Stevenson. Miss Smith, who was known as Jenny, headed the Carroll County bank for five years until retiring last year because of failing health. The bank, which has been a Westminster institution since its founding in 1816, is 21 years older than Carroll County. When appointed president of Union National in 1995, she was one of four women in the state to lead a bank.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2001
The Margaret Smith Gallery has made a name for itself in historic Ellicott City, but the name behind the collection of watercolors, oils and etchings is no longer Margaret Smith. Thomas Akins, an art enthusiast and former gallery manager from Bethesda, purchased the gallery from Smith last month with the aim to add a more classic look to the Main Street mainstay. But Akins, who comes to the gallery after managing Galerie L'Enfant in Washington's Georgetown neighborhood, said he also wants to maintain the artists and types of work Smith has become known for. "The most common question I'm asked is, `What are you going to do?
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2001
Bobbi Smith, a choreographer who taught scores of children to dance, died Monday of pancreatic cancer at her Edgewater home. She was 60. Miss Smith founded the Talent Machine Company, an Annapolis youth troupe. She also taught dance to students at Stageworkz, a Millersville studio she operated with her sister, and at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts in Annapolis. She was remembered for her exuberance and high professional standards. She often urged students to "Catch the energy."
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1999
When she walks out of West Middle School for the last time this week, Oralee Smith will be singing a bittersweet song.The decision to end a 32-year career as a physical education teacher never haunted Smith, 56. Instead, it came about naturally -- and after a frustrating final lap in her chosen field of education.Life as a teacher was gratifying, she said -- the times when former pupils returned to say thank you, watching West Middle's athletes move on to greatness in high school competition and helping to link children to athletics and, eventually, to scholarships.
NEWS
March 30, 1997
Recalling Smith, and discussing her farm's fateI have learned of the recent death of Elizabeth C. Smith of Blandair farm, Columbia.We were friends for 29 years. I first met her in 1968 as a result of an article I wrote in the Constructive Conservative, praising the concept of the planned city of Columbia. She wrote to me asking if I would like some first-hand information; the picture was not as rosy as it might seem at first blush. I accepted the invitation, and she took me to visit several people who had been harmed by the shameful and unethical behavior of some of the developers and the Howard County Commission.
NEWS
December 16, 2001
Coming to the defense of Nancy Smith, Blandair As one who knew Nancy Smith for 28 years and who worked with her on plans to preserve Blandair Farm for 14 of those years, I would like to set the record straight by answering the letter from John McGing ("Nancy Smith to blame for Blandair's problems," Dec. 9). Until her mother's death in 1979, Miss Smith thought the farm would be preserved by being tied up in her father's life estate. When she realized the life estate would not provide the protection she required, she began looking for other means.
NEWS
By Harold Jackson | August 16, 1998
THE NAMES are familiar. You see them whenever you drive around Columbia -- Brunners Run Court, Sewells Orchard Drive, Vollmerhausen Road, Dasher Green Elementary School.These names weren't picked out of thin air, the way some street monikers in Columbia seem to have been. They recognize the farms that were sold to make way for Jim Rouse's planned city.The Vollmerhausen family owned a 140-acre farm on what is now commercial property on Gerwig Lane and Berger Road. Brothers George and Irving Dasher had a 680-acre cattle and grain farm off Oakland Mills Road.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Dana Hedgpeth contributed to this article | July 2, 1998
Though the chances of winning may be slim, a private foundation has filed a lawsuit to halt the sale of the 300-acre Smith farm, the last swath of rural land in Columbia.The suit, filed Monday in Howard Circuit Court, states that Elizabeth C. "Nancy" Smith, an eccentric who died in 1997, wanted to "preserve her land" forever and had no intention to sell the property to private developers or Howard County.County officials, who have been negotiating with Smith's heirs to buy the farm, have expressed interest in creating an athletic complex there.
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