Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMiss Saigon
IN THE NEWS

Miss Saigon

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
Theater-goers who have been pining for a revival of "Miss Saigon," the musical that gave the creators of "Les Miserables" a follow-up hit that ran for a decade in London and New York, will be happy to know that Signature Theatre has obliged. For anyone wondering why a great company would pour so much energy and resources into a work of such epic banality, this new, intermittently impressive production is a little less thrilling. We naysayers appear to be in a minority, I hasten to add. Even before last weekend's official opening, the run was extended.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
Theater-goers who have been pining for a revival of "Miss Saigon," the musical that gave the creators of "Les Miserables" a follow-up hit that ran for a decade in London and New York, will be happy to know that Signature Theatre has obliged. For anyone wondering why a great company would pour so much energy and resources into a work of such epic banality, this new, intermittently impressive production is a little less thrilling. We naysayers appear to be in a minority, I hasten to add. Even before last weekend's official opening, the run was extended.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | June 14, 1994
On the most obvious level, the musical "Miss Saigon" is an updated version of Puccini's "Madame Butterfly," set in Vietnam at the time of the fall of Saigon. On another level, however, the show -- at Washington's Kennedy Center for most of the summer -- is about the tinsel-thinness of the American dream.On that level, the musical succeeds in a way its creators -- composer Claude-Michel Schonberg and lyricists Alain Boublil and Richard Maltby Jr. -- may not have intended. And that's taking into account the glitziest and most sarcastic production number.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | January 8, 2009
In the national touring production of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang currently running at the Hippodrome Theatre, a car takes the final bow. And that's fitting. Though the production is based on the beloved 1968 film and features a cheery, family-friendly plot, an insistently catchy score and a cast with unusually strong voices, the show's true star is the auto that floats and flies. Grumble all you want about how chandeliers that plunge from the ceiling (as in Phantom of the Opera) and helicopters landing on stage (a la Miss Saigon)
NEWS
By ANDREW LAM | January 28, 1991
Poor Miss Saigon, now tattered, now old news, Uncle Sam is just about finished with her. ''Vietnam,'' wrote Charles Krauthammer, ''will be retired as the defining American experience of this age.'' Having found a new romance in the Arabian sand, will America finally put my homeland on a shelf?Vietnam as America's metaphor for defeat and lost innocence will be retired to the cemetery where all useless metaphors go to die. It will be replaced by ''The Lesson of Iraq,'' the new metaphor, we hope, for victory over evil, for a renewed sense of manifest destiny.
FEATURES
October 2, 1990
NEW YORK -- By 9:15 in the morning, there were 67 people in line outside the Royale Theater on West 45th Street, around the corner from Shubert Alley and in the heart of that part of midtown Manhattan known as the theater district or, more specifically, Broadway. When the doors opened a little after 10, there were more than 140, all there with one goal, one dream: to get a job in a Broadway show.But this was not just any Broadway show. The show was "Miss Saigon," the hit London musical that has been the subject of much racial controversy in the last two months, and the audition was specifically for ethnic minority actors -- Asian actors, black actors, Hispanic actors, American Indian actors.
FEATURES
By New York Times | December 6, 1990
NEW YORK -- Cameron Mackintosh, the producer of "Miss Saigon," has asked Actors' Equity for permission to bring Filipino actress Lea Salonga to Broadway to re-create her lead role of a Vietnamese bar girl in the hit London musical.It was unclear what the producer would do if the union turned down his request. Last summer, when the union refused to permit British actor Jonathan Pryce to come to Broadway with the $10-million musical, Mackintosh canceled the Broadway production and did not reinstate it until more than a month later, after Equity changed its mind and after extensive and sometimes bitter negotiations on other casting in the show.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | September 19, 1990
Cameron Mackintosh, the producer of "Miss Saigon," announced Tuesday that he was reinstating his New York production of the hit London musical, which is to begin performances as previously scheduled in March at the Broadway Theater.The announcement apparently brings to an end a two-month dispute that began when objections were raised about Mr. Mackintosh's plan to bring the British actor Jonathan Pryce to Broadway to re-create his award-winning role as the Engineer, a Eurasian pimp.Mr. Mackintosh's decision came after the council of Actors' Equity approved an agreement between the producer and the union on Monday to clear the way for the $10 million show, which had an advance ticket sale of $25 million, to come to Broadway.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2002
This much, Kym Purling has been told: He was abandoned outside Saigon in the fall of 1972. He was 2 or 3 days old, suffering from a severe case of chicken pox and in danger of dying. This much he can guess: His birth parents were of different nationalities. In 30-year-old Purling, Asian features mix with those of some larger-boned race. Night after night, when Purling sits down at the piano and plays the chords for the song that opens the second act of Miss Saigon, he wonders if the song's title - Bui-Doi - refers to him. The dust of life.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 21, 2004
When it comes to mounting a show, dinner theaters tend to concern themselves with what's functional rather than what's spectacular. But Toby's isn't like most dinner theaters, which explains why spectacle has become rather a way of life at the Columbia dinner theater on Symphony Woods Road. Last season, Toby Orenstein, the theater's director and proprietor, used every nook and cranny of her space to weave the grand tapestry of turn-of-the-century America that is the gripping musical Ragtime.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JESSICA BRANDT and JESSICA BRANDT,SUN REPORTER | March 9, 2006
Tomorrow, Toby's Dinner Theatre, which has been in Columbia for the past 27 years, will open a second location, in Baltimore at the newly remodeled Best Western Hotel and Conference Center in Canton. Featuring a four-course buffet and live orchestra, Toby's Baltimore plans to inaugurate its state-of the art performance space with an 11-week run of Walt Disney's Beauty and The Beast, directed by owner Toby Orenstein. The production, which comes off a six-month engagement at the original Toby's, has been revamped to suit the 300-seat auditorium built in conjunction with the renovation of the hotel.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 21, 2004
When it comes to mounting a show, dinner theaters tend to concern themselves with what's functional rather than what's spectacular. But Toby's isn't like most dinner theaters, which explains why spectacle has become rather a way of life at the Columbia dinner theater on Symphony Woods Road. Last season, Toby Orenstein, the theater's director and proprietor, used every nook and cranny of her space to weave the grand tapestry of turn-of-the-century America that is the gripping musical Ragtime.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 2, 2003
I'm sort of the Benedict Arnold of the American musical theater," Richard Maltby Jr. kids. The New York-based lyricist and director is referring to his role as the American collaborator on two musicals imported to Broadway during what came to be known as "the British invasion."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 28, 2002
Miss Saigon never made it to Baltimore during its decade on Broadway because the production was too big to fit in the local theaters. But now a newer, smaller and, in most respects, improved version has arrived at the Lyric Opera House. Theatergoers who thought this show was all about a helicopter may find the touring production disappointing. But theatergoers who favor musicals about human emotions over musicals about machinery may actually prefer this sleeker Saigon. Created by the Les Miserables team of composer Claude-Michel Schonberg and lyricist Alain Boublil, working with American lyricist Richard Maltby Jr., Miss Saigon is a loose adaptation of the Madame Butterfly story, updated to the fall of Saigon in 1975.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Helen B. Jones and Helen B. Jones,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2002
Take a walk with the Wanderers Start off the new year on a good foot by taking a walk with the Freestate Happy Wanderers. You have your choice of a 10K (6.2 miles) or a 5K (3.1 miles) on New Year's Eve or New Year's Day. Both begin at the Owen Brown Community Center, 6800 Cradlerock Way in Columbia. Start anytime between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. and finish by 4 p.m. Along the way, take a Harry Potter trivia quiz, if you're so inclined. After the trek, return to the center for refreshments, including homemade soup, bratwurst, hot dogs and beverages.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2002
This much, Kym Purling has been told: He was abandoned outside Saigon in the fall of 1972. He was 2 or 3 days old, suffering from a severe case of chicken pox and in danger of dying. This much he can guess: His birth parents were of different nationalities. In 30-year-old Purling, Asian features mix with those of some larger-boned race. Night after night, when Purling sits down at the piano and plays the chords for the song that opens the second act of Miss Saigon, he wonders if the song's title - Bui-Doi - refers to him. The dust of life.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and Mary Carole McCauley and J. Wynn Rousuck and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2002
The 2002-2003 season at the Lyric Opera House will be a trip down memory lane, featuring return engagements of a number of Baltimore favorites, spiced up with a few newcomers to town, including Miss Saigon and Some Like It Hot, starring Tony Curtis. "Miss Saigon makes it certainly the most exciting season we've presented," said Nicholas A. Litrenta, president of Performing Arts Productions, which books the series. "I'm equally as excited about Some Like It Hot. It is a completely new musical featuring one of America's favorite stars.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 7, 1991
Surprise may be a key element in live theater, but there were few surprises among this year's Tony Award nominations, announced in New York yesterday."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 12, 2002
The new theater season marks milestone anniversaries for two Baltimore theaters. Center Stage turns 40, and Arena Players, billed as "the nation's oldest continuously operating African-American theater," turns 50. The fare at both is eclectic, and, indeed, variety is a keynote at most of the area's theaters for 2002-2003. At Center Stage, variety comes in the form of a blend of old and new, starting with the season opener - artistic director Irene Lewis' new take on J.M. Barrie's classic, Peter Pan, starring Jefferson Mays as the boy who refuses to grow up. Other highlights include the theater's first-ever co-production with Washington's Arena Stage, a revival of the Fats Waller revue Ain't Misbehavin' and two premieres that originated as Center Stage commissions, Warren Leight's No Foreigners Beyond This Point and Lynn Nottage's Intimate Apparel.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and Mary Carole McCauley and J. Wynn Rousuck and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2002
The 2002-2003 season at the Lyric Opera House will be a trip down memory lane, featuring return engagements of a number of Baltimore favorites, spiced up with a few newcomers to town, including Miss Saigon and Some Like It Hot, starring Tony Curtis. "Miss Saigon makes it certainly the most exciting season we've presented," said Nicholas A. Litrenta, president of Performing Arts Productions, which books the series. "I'm equally as excited about Some Like It Hot. It is a completely new musical featuring one of America's favorite stars.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.