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By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
UPDATE: Carl Snowden has been found guilty of a misdemeanor drug possession charge.  Police smelled marijuana 10 feet from the car in which the civil rights chief for the Maryland attorney general's office was sitting, then saw the marijuana cigar lying a foot from Carl O. Snowden in his car, a Baltimore prosecutor told jurors Monday. "We've all heard of contact highs," city prosecutor Deniece Robinson said in her closing arguments, contending that Snowden had been "enjoying" the illegal drug as much as his passenger was. City police approached the Honda Pilot last April in Druid Hill Park and charged both men. "He knew the marijuana was there.
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SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Ravens cornerback Jimmy Smith has been assigned an Oct. 7 court date at Towson District Court for his misdemeanor disorderly conduct case, according to Baltimore County police spokesman Shawn Vinson. Smith was charged with failure to obey a reasonable and lawful order of a law enforcement officer on July 12 when he was arrested by police and given a citation following an incident at The Greene Turtle in Towson. According to Maryland criminal law code Section 10-201 governing disturbing the peace and disorderly conduct, which includes willfully failing to obey a reasonable and lawful order from a law enforcement officer, those convicted of violating this law are subject to a maximum punishment of 60 days in jail or a fine not exceeding $500, or both penalties.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
Penalties for possessing small amounts of marijuana in Maryland — less than 10 grams — will drop in October, when a new law goes into effect reducing the maximum prison term to 90 days from one year and cutting the potential fine in half, to $500 from $1000. Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg Bernstein backed the bill, which was signed into law Wednesday, as a way to reduce the number of cases clogging the city's circuit courts. "To continue making Baltimore safer, we must focus our limited resources on the strategic investigation and aggressive prosecution of violent offenders," Bernstein said in a statement.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
A University of Maryland lacrosse player was cleared in a Virginia sexual assault case Thursday after being accused of molesting a woman at a concert, his lawyer said. Prosecutors dropped a felony sex assault charge against Benjamin Chisolm and a judge cleared him of assault after a brief bench trial, according to the attorney. But Chisolm was found guilty of being drunk in public and received a fine and community service. "Ben Chisolm was never guilty of a sexual assault, he wasn't guilty of assault and that's the end of it," said the attorney, Edward B. MacMahon, Jr. The Prince William's County Commonwealth's Attorney's Office did not respond to a request for comment.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
A Columbia woman pleaded guilty Thursday to a misdemeanor in connection with a report of an injury her 2-year-old son suffered five months before he was killed by suffocation. Joaquinia M. LaJeuness, 29 — whose son, Elijah, died in April 2011 at age 3 — answered questions but made no statements during a hearing before Howard County Circuit Judge Richard Bernhardt, said T. Wayne Kirwan, a spokesman for the county state's attorney. Bernhardt handed down a prison sentence of three years suspended and the eight days LaJeuness has already served in jail.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Ravens cornerback Jimmy Smith has been assigned an Oct. 7 court date at Towson District Court for his misdemeanor disorderly conduct case, according to Baltimore County police spokesman Shawn Vinson. Smith was charged with failure to obey a reasonable and lawful order of a law enforcement officer on July 12 when he was arrested by police and given a citation following an incident at The Greene Turtle in Towson. According to Maryland criminal law code Section 10-201 governing disturbing the peace and disorderly conduct, which includes willfully failing to obey a reasonable and lawful order from a law enforcement officer, those convicted of violating this law are subject to a maximum punishment of 60 days in jail or a fine not exceeding $500, or both penalties.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 7, 2000
Three teen-age boys were charged as juveniles this week in the September shooting death of a pregnant thoroughbred brood mare in Glenwood. Each boy was charged with one felony count - killing a horse used for racing, breeding or show - as well as misdemeanor charges of cruelty to animals and malicious destruction of property, Assistant State's Attorney Keith Cave confirmed yesterday. Two of the three also were charged with conspiracy, he said. The case has been set for adjudication in February.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2000
When Ray Lewis walks out of an Atlanta courthouse for the last time this week, he will slip right back into the heart of the Ravens' defense. No prison time, no NFL suspension, no waiting. Exoneration from double-murder charges came in the form of a plea bargain. Clearance by the NFL came despite a misdemeanor of obstruction of justice. Could the Ravens have hoped for anything better? "Obviously, we're very pleased with the sequence of events this morning," coach Brian Billick said yesterday, facing what was probably the largest media contingent ever to attend a Ravens' passing camp.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Marego Athans and Jon Morgan and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2000
ATLANTA - Ravens star Ray Lewis, cleared yesterday of murder charges in a plea agreement, is expected to testify against his former co-defendants and a third man who could be charged soon. Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard dropped murder and aggravated assault charges against Lewis, two weeks into his trial. In exchange, Lewis promised to take the stand and pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor obstruction charge for which he will serve a one-year probation. The NFL said yesterday that the misdemeanor conviction will not prevent the All-Pro middle linebacker from playing for the Ravens this fall, and the team said it would welcome him back.
NEWS
June 18, 1996
An article in Thursday's edition of The Sun for Howard County gave incomplete information about the aftermath of a fight over a home-based business in West Friendship.After business owner Robin Davidson filed misdemeanor assault charges against Charles Zepp of Sykesville, Zepp filed misdemeanor assault charges against Davidson and his wife, Patrice Davidson.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 6/18/96
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
About 1,500 people with misdemeanor convictions were mistakenly dropped from Maryland's voter rolls over the past five years, state judiciary officials confirmed Friday. A computer system incorrectly lumped those voters in with felons, who are stripped of their right to vote until their sentence is completed, said Terri Bolling, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Judiciary. People convicted of misdemeanors retain their right to vote in Maryland. Officials said they are fixing the error, discovered in part by former Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Alison Matas, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
Members of the public and most employers would be unable to look up the records of some people convicted of nonviolent misdemeanor offenses under a proposal before the state legislature. The recommendation, under which people could ask the state to shield such information from the public eye after they complete their sentences, was a key recommendation of a task force that examined how best to integrate ex-offenders back into society. But it has faced a tough fight; a similar proposal failed last year amid arguments that citizens are entitled to information about the actions of the legal system.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
Kirk R. Osborn, a career public defender who headed the city's misdemeanor jury trial unit, died of cancer Friday at Union Memorial Hospital. The Mayfield resident was 55. "I'm going to miss him," said Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams. "Kirk was a person I could always trust. He had a high level of integrity. He was a good man who took the time to get to know his clients. His death is a huge loss for those of us who work in the justice system. " Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein said, "Kirk was a consummate professional and a real pleasure to work with, even though we were on different sides of the aisle.
NEWS
November 27, 2012
The case of John Merzbacher, the former South Baltimore Catholic middle school teacher who turned out to be a serial child sexual abuser, represents a terrible tragedy of child abuse fostered by too many others willing to turn a blind eye. But if his case is extreme, it is not unique, and it's particularly galling to hear of cases like that involving Mr. Merzbacher, whose behavior went unreported for decades, or Penn State's Jerry Sandusky, where...
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
UPDATE: Carl Snowden has been found guilty of a misdemeanor drug possession charge.  Police smelled marijuana 10 feet from the car in which the civil rights chief for the Maryland attorney general's office was sitting, then saw the marijuana cigar lying a foot from Carl O. Snowden in his car, a Baltimore prosecutor told jurors Monday. "We've all heard of contact highs," city prosecutor Deniece Robinson said in her closing arguments, contending that Snowden had been "enjoying" the illegal drug as much as his passenger was. City police approached the Honda Pilot last April in Druid Hill Park and charged both men. "He knew the marijuana was there.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
A Columbia woman pleaded guilty Thursday to a misdemeanor in connection with a report of an injury her 2-year-old son suffered five months before he was killed by suffocation. Joaquinia M. LaJeuness, 29 — whose son, Elijah, died in April 2011 at age 3 — answered questions but made no statements during a hearing before Howard County Circuit Judge Richard Bernhardt, said T. Wayne Kirwan, a spokesman for the county state's attorney. Bernhardt handed down a prison sentence of three years suspended and the eight days LaJeuness has already served in jail.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 25, 1995
Attempted involuntary frivolity is a judicial misdemeanor.It's all a misunderstanding. When they taught him in Politician School to kiss babies, Bob Packwood thought he heard them say babes.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2002
A former Carroll County student teacher accused last spring of having sex with two teen-age boys she met at Francis Scott Key High School will enter a plea Friday to one count of providing alcoholic beverages to the boys at a party, according to an agreement reached yesterday. Tracie L. Mokry, 22, of Westminster was scheduled to go to trial yesterday on two misdemeanor charges of contributing to the condition of a child. She was accused of providing alcoholic drinks to the underage boys on two consecutive nights in April at a party at her mother's home.
NEWS
May 4, 2012
For many years, some Baltimore area neighborhood groups have fought strenuously against the addition of methadone clinics to their communities on the grounds that such facilities inevitably bring loiterers and traffic, depress property values and increase crime. Yet it may be time to take at least one of those objections off the list. A soon-to-be-published study that looked at incidents of crime in Baltimore over a two-year period found that the presence of a methadone clinic did not correlate with higher crime rates.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
Penalties for possessing small amounts of marijuana in Maryland — less than 10 grams — will drop in October, when a new law goes into effect reducing the maximum prison term to 90 days from one year and cutting the potential fine in half, to $500 from $1000. Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg Bernstein backed the bill, which was signed into law Wednesday, as a way to reduce the number of cases clogging the city's circuit courts. "To continue making Baltimore safer, we must focus our limited resources on the strategic investigation and aggressive prosecution of violent offenders," Bernstein said in a statement.
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