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NEWS
September 20, 2004
REGARDLESS OF what might be said in defense of awarding the presidency to a candidate who came in second in the popular vote, the practice creates such hard feelings it would be best if it didn't happen again. And yet the country seems to be just as divided this year as it was when George W. Bush depended on the Electoral College (after agonizing rounds of recounts) to install him in the White House four years ago. Political analysts believe it could well remain that way for a decade or more.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 11, 2014
The report that protesters have declared two eastern Ukraine cities to be independent republics questions President Obama's assurance that there is no "military solution" to the crisis that began with Russian President Vladmir Putin's land grab of Crimea. "If Russia moves into eastern Ukraine, either overtly or covertly," White House press secretary Jay Carney said Monday, "this would be a very serious escalation. " But what does that mean? A State Department spokesperson said only that such a move "would result in additional costs" to Moscow.
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NEWS
By Eldon Ham | March 17, 2005
WHERE HAVE YOU gone, Joe DiMaggio? Though disturbing, the new "so-what" spin from Barry Bonds in the wake of shocking steroid revelations by Jose Canseco and others is really a big-league red herring. The real baseball problem is not steroids or even gambling, Sammy Sosa cork or hollowed bats - it's a hollow heart. With its spitballs, stolen signs, brush-backs and even mystical curses, baseball was always the unruly child of team sports, much more Huck Finn than Billy Sunday yet still as American as Mark Twain, Damon Runyon and Yogi Berra.
NEWS
June 19, 2013
No sooner had the U.S. announced that it would reopen long-stalled peace negotiations with the Taliban this week than Afghan President Hamid Karzai rushed to throw cold water on the idea. Mind you, the mercurial Mr. Karzai had been on board with the American plan as recently as the day before. But he suddenly changed his mind after the Taliban opened a political office in Qatar, where the talks are scheduled to take place. It seems that the office, with the group's banner flying outside, made it look too much as if the Taliban were a legitimate government in exile rather than a lawless insurgency.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 21, 1998
Christopher Rouse's prestige can be gauged by the consortium that commissioned his "Der gerettete Alberich" ("Alberich Saved"): the top orchestras of Cleveland, Philadelphia, London and Baltimore. He's got a Composer's Gold Card.He deserves it. When the work was performed last night in Meyerhoff Hall by David Zinman and the Baltimore Symphony, it received a standing ovation. Now, it surely did not hurt the work's reception that the soloist was the immensely popular and attractive superstar percussionist Evelyn Glennie, who scurried barefoot about the stage in a skin-tight, iridescent outfit that made her resemble a water nymph.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | October 14, 1992
Reservoir Hill residents remember Jim Akright as a man who loved a good martini, fashioned a reliable burglar alarm out of washing machine parts and kept working pipe organs on every floor of his house.He collapsed Oct. 1 and died of a heart attack within minutes. Doctors had given him three months to live when he suffered major heart damage six years ago. They advised no hard work, alcohol or smoking. He shattered all their rules and suffered his fatal attack while moving heavy pipe organ parts at a Southwest Baltimore storage warehouse.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2001
Somewhere, Mr. Wilson is finally getting some peace and quiet. And probably shedding a tear or two because of it. Hank Ketcham, creator of "Dennis the Menace," that scruffy, towheaded mischief-maker who for half a century has been tormenting his irascible next-door neighbor, Mr. Wilson, died yesterday at his home in Pebble Beach, Calif. He was 81. Ketcham, who had stopped drawing the strip in 1994, but let it continue under a team of artists and writers, had been suffering from heart disease and cancer.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF WRITER | April 12, 2004
Tonight at midnight, or shortly before, the majority leaders of the Maryland House and Senate will rise and speak what many in Annapolis consider the sweetest words in Latin. Sine die. Literal translation: "without [a] day." Practical translation: Thank heaven it's over. After 90 days, the General Assembly will no longer be in session. The 188 members of Maryland's part-time legislature can go home and return to being doctors, lawyers, farmers or whatever they do in the nine months before the annual roller-coaster ride starts again.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 21, 1995
At least the top Republicans can't do too much mischief in Washington as long as they stay up in New Hampshire.Willie Runyon is not Damon Runyon.
NEWS
December 17, 2006
Truth or Consequences By Alison Lurie Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alison Lurie dishes up a surprising satire about two couples making mischief on a college campus. "One can read Lurie as one might read Jane Austen, with continual delight," Joyce Carol Oates has said. In this novel, Lurie returns to the setting that has delighted her fans throughout her long career - the university campus.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | May 20, 2013
Of course the president deserves some of the blame. Yes, it's extremely unlikely he ordered the IRS to discriminate against tea party, pro-life or Jewish groups opposed to his agenda (though why anyone should take his word for it is beyond me). And his outrage now -- however convenient -- is appreciated. But when people he views as his "enemies" complained about a politicized IRS, what did he do? Nothing. Imagine for a moment if black civil rights organizations, gay groups or teachers unions loudly complained to members of Congress and the press that the IRS was discriminating against them.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
Two Anne Arundel County lawmakers want to protect millions in expected gambling money from being spent in neighborhoods away from the state's largest casino. Their proposed bill would siphon Anne Arundel's local impact grants, which are estimated to total $117 million over the next five years, into a separate account dedicated to improvements near Arundel Mills mall. "I'm trying to hold ourselves to a standard so we can say to the public that we got this money, and this is what we spent it on," said Councilman Peter I. Smith, a Democrat from Severn whose district includes Maryland Live Casino in Hanover.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN and PETER HERMANN,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | October 31, 2008
At first, the pranks were annoying but harmless. Kids moved outdoor furniture and trash cans from one porch to another. They flattened car tires by opening the valves. But in recent years, the pranks have turned what is traditionally called "Moving Night" - the night before Halloween - into something more destructive. Tires have been stabbed with ice picks, school walls covered with graffiti, pumpkins smashed, windows broken, eggs thrown. It's now called "Mischief Night," and a citizens' group from Towson was out in force last night to make "Mischief Night" a safe night for residents.
SPORTS
February 11, 2008
Egypt won its sixth African Cup of Nations title, and second in a row, by beating Cameroon, 1-0, behind Mohamed Aboutreika's goal in the final yesterday in Accra, Ghana. Aboutreika scored in the 77th minute, converting Mohamed Zidan's cross for his fourth goal of the tournament. A crucial error from Rigobert Song led to Aboutreika's goal. Cameroon's captain had two chances to clear the ball but got tangled in a needless duel with Zidan and lost the ball. Zidan squared it perfectly, and Aboutreika finished powerfully in the bottom right corner.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,sun reporter | January 24, 2008
On the night before Halloween in 2004, a group of young boys ran around their Turners Station neighborhood in Dundalk, tossing eggs, firing BB guns and making mischief. "They had no way of knowing," Baltimore County prosecutor Jennifer Schiffer told a jury yesterday at the opening of a murder trial, "the fury that their actions would create." When one egg hit a woman squarely in the chest, a teenager at the party she was attending ran after the boys with a sword. Later, people at the party called some friends, who went looking with a gun for the boys.
FEATURES
By Rachel Abramowitz | January 11, 2008
The miraculous thing about Jack Nicholson is that he can make even schmaltz entertaining. Perhaps it's the deep-in-the-bone sense of mischief that courses through many of his performances. Some screw is permanently loose, leading to such whacked-out delights as The Shining, the nastiness in Five Easy Pieces, the raunchy rebelliousness of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and Terms of Endearment, even the surly focus of Chinatown. He has the gift of being ironic and totally present at the same time.
SPORTS
February 11, 2008
Egypt won its sixth African Cup of Nations title, and second in a row, by beating Cameroon, 1-0, behind Mohamed Aboutreika's goal in the final yesterday in Accra, Ghana. Aboutreika scored in the 77th minute, converting Mohamed Zidan's cross for his fourth goal of the tournament. A crucial error from Rigobert Song led to Aboutreika's goal. Cameroon's captain had two chances to clear the ball but got tangled in a needless duel with Zidan and lost the ball. Zidan squared it perfectly, and Aboutreika finished powerfully in the bottom right corner.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2004
Last week's question What do you like to do on Halloween? 19 percent Drink 23.8 percent Give out candy 7.1 percent Hide 12.4 percent Make mischief 0 percent Throw a party 19 percent Trick-or-Treat 11.9 percent Watch scary movies 9.5 percent Nothing 7.1 percent Other 42 total votes This week's question Where did you get your Election Day coverage? Internet Cable TV Network TV Newspaper Other What coverage? Vote at www.baltimoresun.com / live. Post your answer and see what others have to say, then look for the results (and a new question)
NEWS
December 17, 2006
Truth or Consequences By Alison Lurie Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alison Lurie dishes up a surprising satire about two couples making mischief on a college campus. "One can read Lurie as one might read Jane Austen, with continual delight," Joyce Carol Oates has said. In this novel, Lurie returns to the setting that has delighted her fans throughout her long career - the university campus.
NEWS
By Eldon Ham | March 17, 2005
WHERE HAVE YOU gone, Joe DiMaggio? Though disturbing, the new "so-what" spin from Barry Bonds in the wake of shocking steroid revelations by Jose Canseco and others is really a big-league red herring. The real baseball problem is not steroids or even gambling, Sammy Sosa cork or hollowed bats - it's a hollow heart. With its spitballs, stolen signs, brush-backs and even mystical curses, baseball was always the unruly child of team sports, much more Huck Finn than Billy Sunday yet still as American as Mark Twain, Damon Runyon and Yogi Berra.
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