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By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN REPORTER | June 3, 2008
The Maryland Department of the Environment has filed a lawsuit against the Atlanta-based Mirant power company for allegedly allowing polluted water and heavy metals to escape from a fly ash landfill in Southern Maryland. The suit, filed by Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler on Friday in Charles County Circuit Court, seeks millions in penalties and an end to coal ash dumping at the 38-year-old old Faulkner landfill. The state also wants to stop the flow of pollutants from the site. "Zekiah Swamp is one of the most significant ecological areas in the Chesapeake Bay watershed," the suit from the Maryland Department of Environment reads.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2010
The Environmental Protection Agency proposed new nationwide curbs Tuesday on the disposal of coal ash, which could lead to even tighter restrictions than those now imposed in Maryland since ash from a Baltimore power plant fouled drinking-water wells in Anne Arundel County. "The time has come for common-sense national protections to assure safe disposal of these materials," EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson said in a telephone news conference announcing the proposed rules.
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BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | June 13, 2006
ATLANTA -- Mirant Corp. withdrew its $8 billion hostile takeover bid for NRG Energy yesterday, ending for now a two-week saga that included a court battle, allegations of conflicts of interest, a big-stockholder rebellion and a demand by one large investor that Mirant itself be put up for sale. In a prepared statement announcing the decision, Mirant Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Ed Muller expressed disappointment with the failed bid for Princeton, N.J.-based NRG. "We are disappointed that NRG was unwilling to sit down with us to discuss what would have been a compelling opportunity to create significant value for both companies' shareholders."
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler | April 3, 2010
The Maryland Department of the Environment filed suit Friday against an Atlanta-based power company, alleging that its coal-ash landfill in Prince George's County is polluting groundwater and a nearby creek. The Brandywine landfill operated by Mirant Mid-Atlantic is allowing coal-ash contaminants to seep into the ground and get into Mattaponi Creek, the state agency contends. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, comes 60 days after state environmental officials notified Mirant that it would be sued if it did not agree to clean up pollution from the 300-acre landfill.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 26, 2003
WASHINGTON - Pepco Holdings Inc., owner of the electric utility that serves the metropolitan Washington area, would have a $700 million claim if Mirant Corp., which filed for bankruptcy protection last week, cancels an electricity-supply contract, Pepco Chief Executive Officer Dennis Wraase said yesterday. The company would expect to recover a "substantial" amount of the claim through the bankruptcy court in the event of a cancellation, Wraase said in an interview. Pepco probably would raise customer rates to recover any money it can't get from Atlanta-based Mirant, he said.
NEWS
By Timothy Wheeler and Timothy Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | June 30, 2009
An environmental group and four Maryland residents announced Monday that they have sued the operator of a coal-fired power plant in Prince George's County, alleging that the facility is releasing illegal and harmful amounts of particle pollution into the region's air. In the lawsuit, the Chesapeake Climate Action Network and the four residents ask the U.S. District Court in Baltimore to assess civil penalties against Atlanta-based Mirant Corp. They also want the court to order Mirant to halt the emissions, either by installing additional air pollution controls or by stopping the burning of low-grade fuel oil in two of its power units, which the plaintiffs contend causes the problem.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2005
The Chesapeake Bay Foundation and three other environmental groups notified Mirant power company yesterday that they plan to sue to stop what they described as illegal amounts of nitrogen oxide pollution pouring from a power plant in Montgomery County. The air pollution from the Dickerson plant -- the equivalent of what 40,000 sport utility vehicles would spew in a year -- helps create low-oxygen "dead zones" in the bay and triggers asthma attacks and premature deaths, according to the foundation, which was joined in the legal action by the Environmental Integrity Project and Chesapeake Climate Action Network and the Maryland Public Interest Research Group.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | March 12, 2008
The Mirant company will pay $250,000 in penalties for repeatedly violating air pollution limits at three of Maryland's largest coal-fired power plants, state officials said yesterday. The penalties are part of a consent decree settling a state complaint against the Atlanta-based company for pollution violations at its plants in Prince George's, Montgomery and Charles counties. Soot and fine particulate matter in the smoke from coal-fired plants have been linked to asthma and heart attacks, and excessive amounts of mercury can cause brain damage in babies.
BUSINESS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2005
An Atlanta-based utility took the rare step last night of shutting down a power plant serving the Washington area because it couldn't fix air pollution problems that Virginia warned were a threat to public health. The Mirant Corp. told state officials it would close the 56-year-old, coal-fired Potomac River power plant in Alexandria, Va., five days after being ordered by authorities to immediately start meeting air quality standards, said Bill Hayden, spokesman for the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - Pepco Holdings Inc.'s electric utility serving Washington and parts of Maryland issued an annual request yesterday for wholesale power to serve its retail customers that have not chosen alternative suppliers. Power supplies are required in Washington from Jan. 22, 2004, through Feb. 7, 2005, and in Maryland from Jan. 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. The utility is seeking about 3,680 megawatts for customers that have not selected other suppliers, said Pepco spokesman Robert Dobkin.
NEWS
January 16, 2010
The Maryland Department of the Environment says it plans to sue Mirant Mid-Atlantic and Mirant Maryland Ash Management over disposal of fly ash at its Brandywine site. MDE Secretary Shari Wilson said in a statement Friday that Mirant discharges pollutants from leachate into groundwater without a permit. New state regulations took effect in December 2008, but MDE says it has not been able to reach agreement with Mirant on compliance schedules. The department says it will file notice under the Clean Water Act alleging water pollution violations.
NEWS
By Timothy Wheeler and Timothy Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | June 30, 2009
An environmental group and four Maryland residents announced Monday that they have sued the operator of a coal-fired power plant in Prince George's County, alleging that the facility is releasing illegal and harmful amounts of particle pollution into the region's air. In the lawsuit, the Chesapeake Climate Action Network and the four residents ask the U.S. District Court in Baltimore to assess civil penalties against Atlanta-based Mirant Corp. They also want the court to order Mirant to halt the emissions, either by installing additional air pollution controls or by stopping the burning of low-grade fuel oil in two of its power units, which the plaintiffs contend causes the problem.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN REPORTER | June 3, 2008
The Maryland Department of the Environment has filed a lawsuit against the Atlanta-based Mirant power company for allegedly allowing polluted water and heavy metals to escape from a fly ash landfill in Southern Maryland. The suit, filed by Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler on Friday in Charles County Circuit Court, seeks millions in penalties and an end to coal ash dumping at the 38-year-old old Faulkner landfill. The state also wants to stop the flow of pollutants from the site. "Zekiah Swamp is one of the most significant ecological areas in the Chesapeake Bay watershed," the suit from the Maryland Department of Environment reads.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN REPORTER | April 3, 2008
A power plant ash dump in Southern Maryland leaked toxic pollutants into a wetlands described by the state as one of the most important in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, according to a complaint filed yesterday. In the legal notice, environmental groups and Charles County residents advised state and federal environmental agencies of their intent to sue the Mirant power company over runoff from the Faulkner fly ash landfill. The groups assert that Mirant's own records show that the dump's runoff of toxic pollutants such as selenium and lead into Bowling Creek, which flows into Zekiah Swamp and the Wicomico River, violated water quality standards 12,677 times in 2006 and 2007.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | March 12, 2008
The Mirant company will pay $250,000 in penalties for repeatedly violating air pollution limits at three of Maryland's largest coal-fired power plants, state officials said yesterday. The penalties are part of a consent decree settling a state complaint against the Atlanta-based company for pollution violations at its plants in Prince George's, Montgomery and Charles counties. Soot and fine particulate matter in the smoke from coal-fired plants have been linked to asthma and heart attacks, and excessive amounts of mercury can cause brain damage in babies.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,sun reporter | December 22, 2006
Four environmental groups argued in federal court yesterday that Maryland has given a "free pass" to the state's largest power plant to emit air pollution, allowing it to violate its permit more than 14,200 times over four years. But Atlanta-based Mirant Corp., which owns the Chalk Point power plant in Prince George's County, told Judge J. Frederick Motz in U.S. District Court in Baltimore that the Maryland Department of the Environment diligently enforced air pollution laws by imposing a $75,000 fine this summer.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN REPORTER | April 3, 2008
A power plant ash dump in Southern Maryland leaked toxic pollutants into a wetlands described by the state as one of the most important in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, according to a complaint filed yesterday. In the legal notice, environmental groups and Charles County residents advised state and federal environmental agencies of their intent to sue the Mirant power company over runoff from the Faulkner fly ash landfill. The groups assert that Mirant's own records show that the dump's runoff of toxic pollutants such as selenium and lead into Bowling Creek, which flows into Zekiah Swamp and the Wicomico River, violated water quality standards 12,677 times in 2006 and 2007.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,sun reporter | December 22, 2006
Four environmental groups argued in federal court yesterday that Maryland has given a "free pass" to the state's largest power plant to emit air pollution, allowing it to violate its permit more than 14,200 times over four years. But Atlanta-based Mirant Corp., which owns the Chalk Point power plant in Prince George's County, told Judge J. Frederick Motz in U.S. District Court in Baltimore that the Maryland Department of the Environment diligently enforced air pollution laws by imposing a $75,000 fine this summer.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | June 13, 2006
ATLANTA -- Mirant Corp. withdrew its $8 billion hostile takeover bid for NRG Energy yesterday, ending for now a two-week saga that included a court battle, allegations of conflicts of interest, a big-stockholder rebellion and a demand by one large investor that Mirant itself be put up for sale. In a prepared statement announcing the decision, Mirant Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Ed Muller expressed disappointment with the failed bid for Princeton, N.J.-based NRG. "We are disappointed that NRG was unwilling to sit down with us to discuss what would have been a compelling opportunity to create significant value for both companies' shareholders."
NEWS
By ERIC SCHAEFFER | October 11, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Virginia's Department of Environmental Quality has ordered the Mirant Corp. to clean up or close its aging power plant on the banks of the Potomac River in Alexandria. Mirant's three Maryland plants in Charles, Montgomery and Prince George's counties are much larger, and won't be shutting down any time soon. But given Virginia's aggressive enforcement, it's time to ask whether our state is doing enough about the enormous amount of air pollution caused by Maryland's coal-fired electricity generators.
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