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Miranda Richardson

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Orlando Sentinel | April 10, 2003
Enchanted April 11 a.m. Tuesday WE: Women's Entertainment Enchanted April begins in London, where Lottie Wilkins (Josie Lawrence) becomes obsessed with a newspaper rental advertisement, addressed "to those who appreciate wisteria and sunshine," for a "small medieval Italian castle on the shores of the Mediterranean." Lottie and her neighbor (Miranda Richardson) advertise for additional roommates and settle on Mrs. Fisher (Joan Plowright), a domineering widow, and Lady Caroline Dester (Polly Walker)
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2008
theater 'Ace': See Ace here before it goes to Broadway. This new musical tells the story of a 10-year-old boy who is magically transported back in time - and heals his shattered past. The show, at Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington, Va., runs through Sept. 28. Times vary. Tickets are $49-$86. Call 703-820-9771 or go to signature-theatre.org. Mary Carole McCauley museums 'The Legacy of Enoch Pratt': To commemorate the 200th anniversary of Baltimore philanthropist Enoch Pratt's birth, which was Sept.
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By Susie Linfield and Susie Linfield,New York Times | August 30, 1992
On the day that her new film, "Enchanted April," opened in New York and her performance was hailed as "scene-stealing" and "mesmerizing" in The New York Times, Polly Walker sits in a Manhattan restaurant, calmly eating an apple tart.The 26-year-old English actress says she was "flattered" by the review, but it soon becomes apparent that she hadn't actually bothered to read it until urged to do so.Slightly abashed, she explains, "I took the paper down to breakfast. I read about the plane crash and the Olympics, and it didn't occur to me to look at the reviews.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Orlando Sentinel | April 10, 2003
Enchanted April 11 a.m. Tuesday WE: Women's Entertainment Enchanted April begins in London, where Lottie Wilkins (Josie Lawrence) becomes obsessed with a newspaper rental advertisement, addressed "to those who appreciate wisteria and sunshine," for a "small medieval Italian castle on the shores of the Mediterranean." Lottie and her neighbor (Miranda Richardson) advertise for additional roommates and settle on Mrs. Fisher (Joan Plowright), a domineering widow, and Lady Caroline Dester (Polly Walker)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2008
theater 'Ace': See Ace here before it goes to Broadway. This new musical tells the story of a 10-year-old boy who is magically transported back in time - and heals his shattered past. The show, at Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington, Va., runs through Sept. 28. Times vary. Tickets are $49-$86. Call 703-820-9771 or go to signature-theatre.org. Mary Carole McCauley museums 'The Legacy of Enoch Pratt': To commemorate the 200th anniversary of Baltimore philanthropist Enoch Pratt's birth, which was Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | December 18, 1992
For about an hour, Neil Jordan's "The Crying Game" proceeds along well-worn if banal tracks. It appears to be one of those romantic, neurotic Irish thrillers that can trace its lineage back to Sean O'Casey's "Shadow of a Gunman," and includes such worthies along the way as John Ford's "The Informer" amd Carol Reed's "Odd Man Out."It's the one about the moral killer and the victim he feels so guilty about, and the press of duty and circumstance. Jordan has been such a consistently fresh filmmaker -- he did "The Company of Wolves," the brilliant "Mona Lisa," fumbled a couple of American productions, then returned to his native Ireland for "The Miracle" -- that it's somewhat depressing to find him working in such a familiar neck of the woods.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 19, 1993
I am about to be Mirandized.I have the right to ask stupid questions; she has the right to call me stupid. I have the right to ask inane questions; she has the right to denounce me haughtily. I have the right to ask impertinent questions; she has the right to remain silent.The Miranda in question, of course, isn't the Miranda ruling of the Supreme Court under which, at least in theory, the police are prevented from brutalizing confessions out of suspects without advising them of their rights, but the Miranda Richardson ruling under which the British actress, ardently prodded by her American studio, agrees to talk to the American press but not necessarily to indulge its vanities.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | March 28, 1991
The opening moments of "Die Kinder" are of the most mundane variety -- a mother driving her two kids to their schools, then later walking with a friend as she comes back to pick one of them up.It is a scene of almost cliched familiarity -- a group of mothers standing around a playground, chatting, watching the toddlers play, pushing babies in strollers, waiting for their children to come out of school.Then, in an imperceptible instant, the comfortably commonplace turns into a parent's worst nightmare.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 16, 1996
So much love has gone into the physical details and the music of Robert Altman's "Kansas City" that it's a shame the movie isn't up to the effort.It's a movie you yearn to care for, but it refuses to allow you: It's too busy being singular to be good.The setting is the legendary town of the title at its most legendary time: the early '30s, just after the Kansas City Massacre in which Pretty Boy Floyd allegedly gunned down two FBI agents as well as some cops and the con he was supposed to free.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | April 24, 1995
If sports cliches were used in other walks of life:Foreign Affairs: President Clinton today said Secretary of State Warren Christopher stepped up big-time during recent talks between the United States and North Korea aimed at preventing North Korea from re-starting its nuclear reactor."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 25, 1996
The makers of "The Evening Star" are so worried that you won't remember its predecessor from 13 years ago, "Terms of Endearment," that they continually interrupt the movie to show you photos of the first cast. There's Debra Winger as Shirley MacLaine's doomed daughter Emma, and there's Jeff Daniels as her feckless, worthless son-in-law Flap.This must happen at least 10 times, and each time it's a mistake, because it reminds you that almost no one in this movie is as good as anyone in that movie, and that this movie doesn't get any closer to your heart than your gag reflex, while that one nested instantly between the ventricles.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 16, 1996
So much love has gone into the physical details and the music of Robert Altman's "Kansas City" that it's a shame the movie isn't up to the effort.It's a movie you yearn to care for, but it refuses to allow you: It's too busy being singular to be good.The setting is the legendary town of the title at its most legendary time: the early '30s, just after the Kansas City Massacre in which Pretty Boy Floyd allegedly gunned down two FBI agents as well as some cops and the con he was supposed to free.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | April 24, 1995
If sports cliches were used in other walks of life:Foreign Affairs: President Clinton today said Secretary of State Warren Christopher stepped up big-time during recent talks between the United States and North Korea aimed at preventing North Korea from re-starting its nuclear reactor."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 19, 1993
I am about to be Mirandized.I have the right to ask stupid questions; she has the right to call me stupid. I have the right to ask inane questions; she has the right to denounce me haughtily. I have the right to ask impertinent questions; she has the right to remain silent.The Miranda in question, of course, isn't the Miranda ruling of the Supreme Court under which, at least in theory, the police are prevented from brutalizing confessions out of suspects without advising them of their rights, but the Miranda Richardson ruling under which the British actress, ardently prodded by her American studio, agrees to talk to the American press but not necessarily to indulge its vanities.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | December 18, 1992
For about an hour, Neil Jordan's "The Crying Game" proceeds along well-worn if banal tracks. It appears to be one of those romantic, neurotic Irish thrillers that can trace its lineage back to Sean O'Casey's "Shadow of a Gunman," and includes such worthies along the way as John Ford's "The Informer" amd Carol Reed's "Odd Man Out."It's the one about the moral killer and the victim he feels so guilty about, and the press of duty and circumstance. Jordan has been such a consistently fresh filmmaker -- he did "The Company of Wolves," the brilliant "Mona Lisa," fumbled a couple of American productions, then returned to his native Ireland for "The Miracle" -- that it's somewhat depressing to find him working in such a familiar neck of the woods.
FEATURES
By Susie Linfield and Susie Linfield,New York Times | August 30, 1992
On the day that her new film, "Enchanted April," opened in New York and her performance was hailed as "scene-stealing" and "mesmerizing" in The New York Times, Polly Walker sits in a Manhattan restaurant, calmly eating an apple tart.The 26-year-old English actress says she was "flattered" by the review, but it soon becomes apparent that she hadn't actually bothered to read it until urged to do so.Slightly abashed, she explains, "I took the paper down to breakfast. I read about the plane crash and the Olympics, and it didn't occur to me to look at the reviews.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 25, 1996
The makers of "The Evening Star" are so worried that you won't remember its predecessor from 13 years ago, "Terms of Endearment," that they continually interrupt the movie to show you photos of the first cast. There's Debra Winger as Shirley MacLaine's doomed daughter Emma, and there's Jeff Daniels as her feckless, worthless son-in-law Flap.This must happen at least 10 times, and each time it's a mistake, because it reminds you that almost no one in this movie is as good as anyone in that movie, and that this movie doesn't get any closer to your heart than your gag reflex, while that one nested instantly between the ventricles.
FEATURES
November 2, 2007
Next Friday BEFORE THE DEVIL KNOWS YOU'RE DEAD -- (THINKFilm) Brothers (Philip Seymour Hoffman and Ethan Hawke) decide to rob their parents' jewelry store. CHRISTMAS IN WONDERLAND -- (Yari Fim Group) Two kids from Los Angeles move to Canada, help solve a crime and discover something interesting about Santa Claus. With Patrick Swayze, Tim Curry and Carmen Electra. FRED CLAUS -- (Warner Bros.) Fred Claus (Vince Vaughn), Santa's bitter older brother, is forced to move to the North Pole.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | March 28, 1991
The opening moments of "Die Kinder" are of the most mundane variety -- a mother driving her two kids to their schools, then later walking with a friend as she comes back to pick one of them up.It is a scene of almost cliched familiarity -- a group of mothers standing around a playground, chatting, watching the toddlers play, pushing babies in strollers, waiting for their children to come out of school.Then, in an imperceptible instant, the comfortably commonplace turns into a parent's worst nightmare.
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