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By Los Angeles Times | October 11, 1990
"Cinema Paradiso," the sentimental Italian film that celebrates moviegoing, could become the highest-grossing foreign-language film of the past decade. A spokeswoman for Miramax Films says ''Cinema Paradiso'' has sold more than $9.5 million worth of tickets. "My Life as a Dog" (1987) grossed $8.3 million, and "Das Boot" (1982) topped $10 million.
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By Michael Sragow | October 9, 2009
'The Baader-Meinhof Complex' ***1/2 ( 3 1/2 STARS) One of the few political movies of the new millennium that comes close to the excitement and revelation of classics like "Z" or "The Battle of Algiers," this unsparing look at the West German terrorists who brewed bloody revolutionary actions out of muddled Marxist theory is an exciting, combative and infuriating experience. It boasts another indelible performance from Martina Gedeck, who makes something both moving and harrowing out of Ulrike Meinhof's transformation from bourgeois left-wing intellectual to terrorist.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 26, 2006
Keeping Up With the Steins is equal parts a rumination on the rapacious silliness that comes from efforts to keep up with the Joneses and a tale of family rapprochement. Too bad the filmmakers couldn't settle on one plotline and stick with it. The resulting film is affable enough, featuring an endearing turn from Garry Marshall as an eccentric grandfather who, on the occasion of his grandson's bar mitzvah, seems the only person in the universe concentrating on the boy's best interests.
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August 28, 2009
Sept. 4 All About Steve : (20th Century Fox) Sandra Bullock plays an eccentric crossword puzzle constructor who falls for a handsome cable news cameraman and follows him across the country. With Thomas Haden Church and Bradley Cooper. Cold Souls: (The Samuel Goldwyn Co.) When souls can be extracted and traded as commodities, a man must track down his chickpea-size soul that was borrowed for a Russian soap-opera actress. With Paul Giamatti and David Strathairn. Extract: (Miramax Films)
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By Michael Sragow | November 14, 2008
last call Happy-Go-Lucky : **** ( 4 STARS) If you've never seen a Mike Leigh movie, the best place to start is this portrait of an optimistic London schoolteacher (Sally Hawkins, left) who demonstrates the power of an attitude that embraces the world. It will introduce you to the way he builds characters and the way people in life build friendships, intuitively and in action. If you're already a Leigh fan, go and savor a film that reflects the sunniest facets of his genius (without ignoring the dark sides)
ENTERTAINMENT
By The Hollywood Reporter | June 2, 1995
In an unusual marriage of artistic and commercial genealogy, Miramax Films has signed a multi-year, first-look deal with Sharon Stone and her Chaos Productions for the actress to develop, acquire, produce and distribute films under the Miramax label."
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By Michael Sragow | October 9, 2009
'The Baader-Meinhof Complex' ***1/2 ( 3 1/2 STARS) One of the few political movies of the new millennium that comes close to the excitement and revelation of classics like "Z" or "The Battle of Algiers," this unsparing look at the West German terrorists who brewed bloody revolutionary actions out of muddled Marxist theory is an exciting, combative and infuriating experience. It boasts another indelible performance from Martina Gedeck, who makes something both moving and harrowing out of Ulrike Meinhof's transformation from bourgeois left-wing intellectual to terrorist.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 11, 2005
The Chorus is unabashedly sentimental and just as unabashedly cliched. All that doesn't make it necessarily bad, but it does make it lazy - a classic case of a film that's fine for those who like this sort of thing, anathema for those who don't. Like Mr. Holland's Opus, like The Dead Poets Society, like To Sir, With Love, The Chorus is the story of a dedicated teacher who finds himself in a class of miscreants determined to make his life miserable. Does it surprise anyone to hear the teacher is so dedicated that they learn in spite of themselves?
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By Patrick Goldstein and Patrick Goldstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 2002
HOLLYWOOD -- Haley Joel Osment has put together a pretty impressive string of recent films. He got an Oscar nomination for his role in the blockbuster The Sixth Sense; co-starred opposite Jude Law in Steven Spielberg's A.I.: Artificial Intelligence; and appeared with Kevin Spacey in the drama Pay It Forward. But the movie the young actor really put his heart into is a movie that you may never see. Called Edges of the Lord, it features Osment as a blond, blue-eyed Jewish boy who is given a chance to survive by passing as a Gentile during the Nazi invasion of Poland.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 23, 1998
It's official. "There's Something About Mary," the gross-out comedy starring Ben Stiller and Cameron Diaz, is the sleeper hit of the summer, taking on a mantle that "My Best Friend's Wedding" wore last summer and "Babe" the summer before that.Sleepers - big hits that seem to come out of nowhere, taking film studios, critics and audiences alike by surprise - now seem to be staples of the summer movie season, on a par with the biggest explosions and the most humiliating bomb. But in an age when marketing and publicity are manipulated to within a hair's breadth - when there are computer programs that predict a film's box-office performance before the cameras even start running - is such a thing as an authentic sleeper even possible?
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | November 14, 2008
last call Happy-Go-Lucky : **** ( 4 STARS) If you've never seen a Mike Leigh movie, the best place to start is this portrait of an optimistic London schoolteacher (Sally Hawkins, left) who demonstrates the power of an attitude that embraces the world. It will introduce you to the way he builds characters and the way people in life build friendships, intuitively and in action. If you're already a Leigh fan, go and savor a film that reflects the sunniest facets of his genius (without ignoring the dark sides)
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 26, 2006
Keeping Up With the Steins is equal parts a rumination on the rapacious silliness that comes from efforts to keep up with the Joneses and a tale of family rapprochement. Too bad the filmmakers couldn't settle on one plotline and stick with it. The resulting film is affable enough, featuring an endearing turn from Garry Marshall as an eccentric grandfather who, on the occasion of his grandson's bar mitzvah, seems the only person in the universe concentrating on the boy's best interests.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 11, 2005
The Chorus is unabashedly sentimental and just as unabashedly cliched. All that doesn't make it necessarily bad, but it does make it lazy - a classic case of a film that's fine for those who like this sort of thing, anathema for those who don't. Like Mr. Holland's Opus, like The Dead Poets Society, like To Sir, With Love, The Chorus is the story of a dedicated teacher who finds himself in a class of miscreants determined to make his life miserable. Does it surprise anyone to hear the teacher is so dedicated that they learn in spite of themselves?
FEATURES
By Patrick Goldstein and Patrick Goldstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 2002
HOLLYWOOD -- Haley Joel Osment has put together a pretty impressive string of recent films. He got an Oscar nomination for his role in the blockbuster The Sixth Sense; co-starred opposite Jude Law in Steven Spielberg's A.I.: Artificial Intelligence; and appeared with Kevin Spacey in the drama Pay It Forward. But the movie the young actor really put his heart into is a movie that you may never see. Called Edges of the Lord, it features Osment as a blond, blue-eyed Jewish boy who is given a chance to survive by passing as a Gentile during the Nazi invasion of Poland.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 23, 1998
It's official. "There's Something About Mary," the gross-out comedy starring Ben Stiller and Cameron Diaz, is the sleeper hit of the summer, taking on a mantle that "My Best Friend's Wedding" wore last summer and "Babe" the summer before that.Sleepers - big hits that seem to come out of nowhere, taking film studios, critics and audiences alike by surprise - now seem to be staples of the summer movie season, on a par with the biggest explosions and the most humiliating bomb. But in an age when marketing and publicity are manipulated to within a hair's breadth - when there are computer programs that predict a film's box-office performance before the cameras even start running - is such a thing as an authentic sleeper even possible?
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By Kitty Bowe Hearty and Kitty Bowe Hearty,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 12, 1998
NEW YORK -- While introducing the film "Down in the Delta" last week at the Urbanworld International Film Festival, the prize-winning poet Maya Angelou said, more than once, "There is nothing so powerful as an idea whose time has come."The "idea" encompassed the power of film itself and, more specifically, the importance of the festival. Though it's young, in its second year, Urbanworld brings African-American-themed films and filmmakers to New York City, one of the centers of the independent film world.
FEATURES
August 28, 2009
Sept. 4 All About Steve : (20th Century Fox) Sandra Bullock plays an eccentric crossword puzzle constructor who falls for a handsome cable news cameraman and follows him across the country. With Thomas Haden Church and Bradley Cooper. Cold Souls: (The Samuel Goldwyn Co.) When souls can be extracted and traded as commodities, a man must track down his chickpea-size soul that was borrowed for a Russian soap-opera actress. With Paul Giamatti and David Strathairn. Extract: (Miramax Films)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 13, 1998
Don't let the name fool you. The Baltimore Jewish Film Festival, which is celebrating its 10th anniversary this year, will appeal to filmgoers of any religious affiliation."
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 13, 1998
Don't let the name fool you. The Baltimore Jewish Film Festival, which is celebrating its 10th anniversary this year, will appeal to filmgoers of any religious affiliation."
ENTERTAINMENT
By The Hollywood Reporter | June 2, 1995
In an unusual marriage of artistic and commercial genealogy, Miramax Films has signed a multi-year, first-look deal with Sharon Stone and her Chaos Productions for the actress to develop, acquire, produce and distribute films under the Miramax label."
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