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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | November 30, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Tom McCarthy isn't ready to say he's made it. But he may be closer than he's willing to admit. That's what happens when a first-time writer-director's movie -- in this case, The Station Agent, a quiet character study of three unlikely friends and the train tracks that help bring them together -- turns out to be a major hit at the Sundance Festival. It also helps when, within days, the movie gets picked up by Miramax for a cool $3.2 million. And a handful of glowing reviews don't hurt.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 15, 2006
The latest monument to American mediocrity, The Last Kiss, should make local movie lovers ask: Instead of redoing terrific foreign films with hard-to-recapture qualities in English, why not rerelease the originals with great ad campaigns? Tony Goldwyn's American version of Italian director Gabriele Muccino's splendid 2002 Italian hit turns a sunny Mediterranean tragicomedy into an awkward Midwest mixture of farce and soap opera. It can be great when a filmmaker remakes a foreign classic or cult movie and puts his own spin on it -- the way John Sturges did when he remade Kurosawa's Seven Samurai as The Magnificent Seven.
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By Yardena Arar and Yardena Arar,Los Angeles Daily News | September 11, 1991
Los Angeles-- THE POPE Must Die" was expiring at the box office, so its distributor decided to take extraordinary life-saving measures.Now it's "The Pope Must Diet."
FEATURES
December 27, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Millions of Americans went shopping for comedy this weekend, giving the star-studded Meet the Fockers the record for the best Christmas weekend opening ever. The sequel, reuniting Ben Stiller and Robert DeNiro and adding Dustin Hoffman and Barbra Streisand as Stiller's parents, earned $44.7 million over the holiday weekend, beating the previous record of $30 million, set in 2002 by Catch Me if You Can. This weekend's top 12 films grossed an estimated $121.9 million, compared to last year's $165.
FEATURES
January 5, 1996
"The Postman," the top-grossing foreign film of 1995, has been released in over 250 theaters -- including The Rotunda -- the widest release ever for a foreign-language movie."The Postman" ("Il Postino") featured Phillipe Noiret as the Chilean poet Pablo Neruda, who achieved a touching relationship with his illiterate postman (Massimo Troisi).The movie has showed up on many end-of-year best-film lists. Miramax is spending money in Los Angeles to push for a Best Picture nomination for "The Postman.
FEATURES
November 27, 2002
Top films at the box office over the weekend, with distributor, weekend gross, total gross, number of weeks in release: 1 Die Another Day MGM $47.1 million $47.1 million 1 2 Harry Potter Warner Bros. $42.2 million $148.4 million 2 3 Friday ... Next New Line $13.0 million $13.0 million 1 4 Santa Clause 2 Disney $10.2 million $94.9 million 4 5 8 Mile Universal $8.6 million $97.6 million 3 6 The Ring DreamWorks $7.6 million $110.8 million 6 7 Emperor's Club Universal $3.8 million $3.8 million 1 8 Greek ... Wedding IFC Films $3.7 million $204.
FEATURES
By Hollywood Reporter | August 28, 1994
The New York Film Festival has finally gotten a film from New York's most "New York" filmmaker.After decades of eluding what seemed like an obvious showcase for Woody Allen's work, an Allen film, his new Miramax comedy "Bullets Over Broadway," will make its U.S.debut at the 32nd New York Film Festival.The festival will be christening a new slot for the Allen homecoming, making "Bullets Over Broadway" its "Centerpiece" presentation. The high-profile designation, similar in stature to the opening and closing night slots, will take place mid-festival and is expected to become an event staple.
FEATURES
December 27, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Millions of Americans went shopping for comedy this weekend, giving the star-studded Meet the Fockers the record for the best Christmas weekend opening ever. The sequel, reuniting Ben Stiller and Robert DeNiro and adding Dustin Hoffman and Barbra Streisand as Stiller's parents, earned $44.7 million over the holiday weekend, beating the previous record of $30 million, set in 2002 by Catch Me if You Can. This weekend's top 12 films grossed an estimated $121.9 million, compared to last year's $165.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 15, 2006
The latest monument to American mediocrity, The Last Kiss, should make local movie lovers ask: Instead of redoing terrific foreign films with hard-to-recapture qualities in English, why not rerelease the originals with great ad campaigns? Tony Goldwyn's American version of Italian director Gabriele Muccino's splendid 2002 Italian hit turns a sunny Mediterranean tragicomedy into an awkward Midwest mixture of farce and soap opera. It can be great when a filmmaker remakes a foreign classic or cult movie and puts his own spin on it -- the way John Sturges did when he remade Kurosawa's Seven Samurai as The Magnificent Seven.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Kipen | December 5, 1999
Patricia Rozema has a recurring nightmare. The writer-director is chatting with Jane Austen, whose novel "Mansfield Park" Rozema has made into the current movie. She finally works up the courage to ask Austen's opinion of her adaptation: "Is this what you were after, Jane? Is this what you meant?" In Rozema's telling, Aus-ten shoots back, " 'No! Start over!' " Every literary adaptation opens a similar conversation, real or imagined, between filmmaker and author. But why are so many of these conversations going on now?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | November 30, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Tom McCarthy isn't ready to say he's made it. But he may be closer than he's willing to admit. That's what happens when a first-time writer-director's movie -- in this case, The Station Agent, a quiet character study of three unlikely friends and the train tracks that help bring them together -- turns out to be a major hit at the Sundance Festival. It also helps when, within days, the movie gets picked up by Miramax for a cool $3.2 million. And a handful of glowing reviews don't hurt.
FEATURES
November 27, 2002
Top films at the box office over the weekend, with distributor, weekend gross, total gross, number of weeks in release: 1 Die Another Day MGM $47.1 million $47.1 million 1 2 Harry Potter Warner Bros. $42.2 million $148.4 million 2 3 Friday ... Next New Line $13.0 million $13.0 million 1 4 Santa Clause 2 Disney $10.2 million $94.9 million 4 5 8 Mile Universal $8.6 million $97.6 million 3 6 The Ring DreamWorks $7.6 million $110.8 million 6 7 Emperor's Club Universal $3.8 million $3.8 million 1 8 Greek ... Wedding IFC Films $3.7 million $204.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 1, 2001
In recent weeks, HBO has faced a dilemma: It was about to launch a 12-part reality series in a choice Sunday night time period just as everyone was starting to ask if the reality genre is burned out. So the cable channel known for its outstanding documentaries decided to affix that label to its new, 12-part series, and hope no one would notice the difference. Viewers who tune in to HBO's Project Greenlight, a series about the making of a feature film from Internet script contest to finished product, will know they are watching a reality series and not a documentary.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,Sun Film Critic | March 25, 2001
The good news for bettors is that most Oscars are still up for grabs. "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" or "Gladiator"? Tom Hanks or Russell Crowe? The bad news for movie-lovers is that only bettors should care. The Oscars are up for grabs because American movies are up for grabs. Once upon a time, every major studio had films of Academy caliber. Even if nominees were coffee-table films or gas-bags, they signaled the drive to create quality at Hollywood's high end. Groundbreakers such as "On the Waterfront" not only entered the Academy ranks but also the winner's circle, while epic dramas like "Lawrence of Arabia" represented peaks of movie arts and crafts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | December 26, 1999
Two seminal events of 1989 helped set the course for film in the 1990s.First, a talky, micro-budgeted film by an unknown director won the audience award for best film at the Sundance Film Festival. It was subsequently bought by a then-little-known Miramax Films, ushering in the era of the independent film. "Sex, lies and videotape," the little-engine-that-could, became more powerful than a speeding locomotive as Hollywood set out to find the next Steven Soderbergh.That same year, the Sony Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Kipen | December 5, 1999
Patricia Rozema has a recurring nightmare. The writer-director is chatting with Jane Austen, whose novel "Mansfield Park" Rozema has made into the current movie. She finally works up the courage to ask Austen's opinion of her adaptation: "Is this what you were after, Jane? Is this what you meant?" In Rozema's telling, Aus-ten shoots back, " 'No! Start over!' " Every literary adaptation opens a similar conversation, real or imagined, between filmmaker and author. But why are so many of these conversations going on now?
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 1, 2001
In recent weeks, HBO has faced a dilemma: It was about to launch a 12-part reality series in a choice Sunday night time period just as everyone was starting to ask if the reality genre is burned out. So the cable channel known for its outstanding documentaries decided to affix that label to its new, 12-part series, and hope no one would notice the difference. Viewers who tune in to HBO's Project Greenlight, a series about the making of a feature film from Internet script contest to finished product, will know they are watching a reality series and not a documentary.
FEATURES
January 5, 1996
"The Postman," the top-grossing foreign film of 1995, has been released in over 250 theaters -- including The Rotunda -- the widest release ever for a foreign-language movie."The Postman" ("Il Postino") featured Phillipe Noiret as the Chilean poet Pablo Neruda, who achieved a touching relationship with his illiterate postman (Massimo Troisi).The movie has showed up on many end-of-year best-film lists. Miramax is spending money in Los Angeles to push for a Best Picture nomination for "The Postman.
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