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By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2003
Racing against the clock on a bitterly cold night, two paramedics scrambled up the stairs of a cluttered Essex rowhouse sometime after midnight. On the second floor, they found an unconscious man in his underwear, wedged between the wall and a bed, very near death. The paramedics, Amanda Drasal and Denise Childs, had seen this many times on Baltimore County's east side - a heroin overdose, one of hundreds reported each year in the county. Their patient was in critical shape. He was breathing three times a minute, unresponsive.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 16, 2014
Perhaps you've heard of the Fourth Amendment. That's the one that guarantees freedom from unfettered government snooping, the one that says government needs probable cause and a warrant before it can search or seize your things. That guarantee would seem to be ironclad, but we've been learning lately that it's not. Indeed, maybe we've reached the point where the Fourth ought to be marked with an asterisk and followed by disclaimers in the manner of the announcer who spends 30 seconds extolling the miracle drug and the next 30 speed-reading its dire side effects: To wit: "Fourth Amendment not available to black and Hispanic men walking in New York, who may be stopped and frisked for no discernible reason.
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NEWS
By LYLE DENNISTON | November 25, 1990
Somewhere, in this country or overseas, there is supposed to be a villain who can be blamed for creating the almost unsolvable legal puzzle over use of the next "miracle" drug: RU-486. But everyone who might be the culprit is pointing at someone else.RU-486 -- a drug invented in France a decade ago -- is now proclaimed by many doctors, researchers, scientists and victims some kinds of cancer as a "medical breakthrough," a truly revolutionary new medicine. Depending upon what future tests show, RU-486 might even be useful in dealing with the AIDS epidemic.
NEWS
June 8, 2008
Is there nothing red wine can't cure? Apparently hoping to trump previous studies that have demonstrated its health benefits, from increasing endurance to lowering obesity, scientists have found that taking doses of resveratrol, a compound found in red wine, can make one live longer. Well, that may be overstating things a bit. Actually, they found that it does wonders for the longevity of mice, but that's a minor detail. For the serious oenophile, this is still news worth toasting. Alas, there may be an even bigger catch than the rodent clause: The study and similarly positive ones before it are based on taking quite a large quantity of resveratrol.
NEWS
By Cyril T. Zaneski and Cyril T. Zaneski,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2004
Judith Levinson-Warsaw whispers this prayer every time she takes the medicine she credits with rescuing her from crippling rheumatoid arthritis: "Miracle drug, miracle drug. Thank you, science, and God above." The 59-year-old Rockville resident had been on disability for almost a decade and was reeling from 14 operations and a string of side effects from traditional medication when she was introduced in 1999 to a new biotech medicine, etanercept. Now - after more than 530 treatments - Levinson-Warsaw says she's "in the go mode," working as a glass artist in her studio and looking forward to dancing at her daughter's wedding this summer.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 16, 2014
Perhaps you've heard of the Fourth Amendment. That's the one that guarantees freedom from unfettered government snooping, the one that says government needs probable cause and a warrant before it can search or seize your things. That guarantee would seem to be ironclad, but we've been learning lately that it's not. Indeed, maybe we've reached the point where the Fourth ought to be marked with an asterisk and followed by disclaimers in the manner of the announcer who spends 30 seconds extolling the miracle drug and the next 30 speed-reading its dire side effects: To wit: "Fourth Amendment not available to black and Hispanic men walking in New York, who may be stopped and frisked for no discernible reason.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | June 15, 1993
One of the reasons I originally agreed to develop a weekly column on women's health is my commitment to giving women the information they need to make informed decisions about their own health. And because of their unique ability to conceive and create life, women's decisions are often intrinsically more complicated than men's.The acne medicine Accutane is an extremely effective medication, but for women in particular it also has potentially serious side effects. The decision about whether to use this drug provides an excellent example of the kinds of decisions women must make and the kind of responsibility they must take.
NEWS
By Janice G. Raymond | April 14, 1993
IN THE U.S. debate over RU-486, only two positions hav been recognized: anti-abortion activists who contest its use and pro-choice advocates who claim that it will revolutionize the abortion procedure for women. There is a third position: Women need safe, legal abortions, but RU-486 is a problematic and often harmful abortion method.There are many misleading claims for RU-486. Most people think it is one drug when, in fact, it is two -- RU-486 plus prostaglandin (PG). Often, other drugs are added to alleviate the side effects of the first two, thus becoming a sort of "drug cocktail."
NEWS
June 8, 2008
Is there nothing red wine can't cure? Apparently hoping to trump previous studies that have demonstrated its health benefits, from increasing endurance to lowering obesity, scientists have found that taking doses of resveratrol, a compound found in red wine, can make one live longer. Well, that may be overstating things a bit. Actually, they found that it does wonders for the longevity of mice, but that's a minor detail. For the serious oenophile, this is still news worth toasting. Alas, there may be an even bigger catch than the rodent clause: The study and similarly positive ones before it are based on taking quite a large quantity of resveratrol.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Blackerby and Cheryl Blackerby,COX NEWS SERVICE | February 4, 1996
As soon as the 747 took off from New York's Kennedy Airport at 7 p.m., I put two small white tablets under my tongue and settled back in my seat to see what would happen.I was testing the new cure for jet lag -- melatonin -- a "miracle drug" that made the cover of Newsweek in November and was discussed recently on "Donahue."At least four recent books have touted the wonders of it, including "The Melatonin Miracle" by Walter Pierpaoli and William Regelson (Simon & Schuster; $21), which came out in August and made it to No. 3 on the New York Times best-seller list.
NEWS
By Cyril T. Zaneski and Cyril T. Zaneski,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2004
Judith Levinson-Warsaw whispers this prayer every time she takes the medicine she credits with rescuing her from crippling rheumatoid arthritis: "Miracle drug, miracle drug. Thank you, science, and God above." The 59-year-old Rockville resident had been on disability for almost a decade and was reeling from 14 operations and a string of side effects from traditional medication when she was introduced in 1999 to a new biotech medicine, etanercept. Now - after more than 530 treatments - Levinson-Warsaw says she's "in the go mode," working as a glass artist in her studio and looking forward to dancing at her daughter's wedding this summer.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2003
Racing against the clock on a bitterly cold night, two paramedics scrambled up the stairs of a cluttered Essex rowhouse sometime after midnight. On the second floor, they found an unconscious man in his underwear, wedged between the wall and a bed, very near death. The paramedics, Amanda Drasal and Denise Childs, had seen this many times on Baltimore County's east side - a heroin overdose, one of hundreds reported each year in the county. Their patient was in critical shape. He was breathing three times a minute, unresponsive.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 22, 2000
In 1958, an American scientist managed to do what nature had failed to. He made a dwarf grow. For the first time, mankind had harnessed human growth hormone. By 1963, while technically still an experimental drug, the hormone was being supplied free of charge by the National Institutes of Health to pediatricians across the United States. For the next 22 years, the drug was administered to more than 8,000 stunted children. It worked. The children grew. But then, decades after taking the hormone, a small but steady succession of recipients began to develop strange symptoms.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Diana K. Sugg and Douglas M. Birch and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1998
Two recently developed drugs that wipe out cancer in animal experiments hold real promise, scientists say. But when it comes to curing millions of human victims, the road to a miracle may still be littered with land mines.Crucial tests of whether these drugs work in people are still at least a year away, perhaps much longer. Disappointed by past claims of a cure, many cancer patients aren't getting their hopes up.Scientists are just as cautious."I'm not aware of any compounds with more promise than these," said Stephen B. Baylin, professor of oncology at the Johns Hopkins medical school and director of research at its cancer center, noting that the drugs have inspired "unprecedented" optimism.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Blackerby and Cheryl Blackerby,COX NEWS SERVICE | February 4, 1996
As soon as the 747 took off from New York's Kennedy Airport at 7 p.m., I put two small white tablets under my tongue and settled back in my seat to see what would happen.I was testing the new cure for jet lag -- melatonin -- a "miracle drug" that made the cover of Newsweek in November and was discussed recently on "Donahue."At least four recent books have touted the wonders of it, including "The Melatonin Miracle" by Walter Pierpaoli and William Regelson (Simon & Schuster; $21), which came out in August and made it to No. 3 on the New York Times best-seller list.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | June 15, 1993
One of the reasons I originally agreed to develop a weekly column on women's health is my commitment to giving women the information they need to make informed decisions about their own health. And because of their unique ability to conceive and create life, women's decisions are often intrinsically more complicated than men's.The acne medicine Accutane is an extremely effective medication, but for women in particular it also has potentially serious side effects. The decision about whether to use this drug provides an excellent example of the kinds of decisions women must make and the kind of responsibility they must take.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 22, 2000
In 1958, an American scientist managed to do what nature had failed to. He made a dwarf grow. For the first time, mankind had harnessed human growth hormone. By 1963, while technically still an experimental drug, the hormone was being supplied free of charge by the National Institutes of Health to pediatricians across the United States. For the next 22 years, the drug was administered to more than 8,000 stunted children. It worked. The children grew. But then, decades after taking the hormone, a small but steady succession of recipients began to develop strange symptoms.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Diana K. Sugg and Douglas M. Birch and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1998
Two recently developed drugs that wipe out cancer in animal experiments hold real promise, scientists say. But when it comes to curing millions of human victims, the road to a miracle may still be littered with land mines.Crucial tests of whether these drugs work in people are still at least a year away, perhaps much longer. Disappointed by past claims of a cure, many cancer patients aren't getting their hopes up.Scientists are just as cautious."I'm not aware of any compounds with more promise than these," said Stephen B. Baylin, professor of oncology at the Johns Hopkins medical school and director of research at its cancer center, noting that the drugs have inspired "unprecedented" optimism.
NEWS
By Janice G. Raymond | April 14, 1993
IN THE U.S. debate over RU-486, only two positions hav been recognized: anti-abortion activists who contest its use and pro-choice advocates who claim that it will revolutionize the abortion procedure for women. There is a third position: Women need safe, legal abortions, but RU-486 is a problematic and often harmful abortion method.There are many misleading claims for RU-486. Most people think it is one drug when, in fact, it is two -- RU-486 plus prostaglandin (PG). Often, other drugs are added to alleviate the side effects of the first two, thus becoming a sort of "drug cocktail."
NEWS
By LYLE DENNISTON | November 25, 1990
Somewhere, in this country or overseas, there is supposed to be a villain who can be blamed for creating the almost unsolvable legal puzzle over use of the next "miracle" drug: RU-486. But everyone who might be the culprit is pointing at someone else.RU-486 -- a drug invented in France a decade ago -- is now proclaimed by many doctors, researchers, scientists and victims some kinds of cancer as a "medical breakthrough," a truly revolutionary new medicine. Depending upon what future tests show, RU-486 might even be useful in dealing with the AIDS epidemic.
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