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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 18, 1997
MOSCOW -- Technical failures that vexed the last crew aboard the Mir space station spilled over into the current mission yesterday when a computer malfunction forced the new arrivals to postpone an automatic docking exercise.Mir commander Anatoly Solovev had been expected to pilot the Progress cargo capsule into a docking port at the Russian station, but a computer controlling the operation refused to accept data transmitted from Mission Control north of Moscow, spokesman Valery Lyndin said.
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 4, 2003
KOROLYOV, Russia - Some appeared red-eyed and anguished, others stoic and somber. They spoke different languages and saluted different flags. But the Russian and American space explorers who gathered at Russia's Mission Control Center here yesterday were united in their grief. All had known at least some of the seven crew members - six Americans and one Israeli - who died Saturday aboard the space shuttle Columbia. Amid prayers, a few tears and the playing of three national anthems - American, Israeli and Russian - the astronauts, cosmonauts and others at yesterday's memorial service sought solace from their colleagues.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 8, 1997
KOROLEV, Russia -- After 12 nerve-wracking days of battling to keep the Mir space station aloft after a crippling accident, U.S. astronaut Michael Foale and his two Russian colleagues were so exhausted that the unloading of a newly arrived supply craft was postponed for a day, the Mission Control Center's press chief said yesterday."
FEATURES
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 28, 2001
MOSCOW - Most laughed - it had to be a joke - when they heard he would take up cosmonaut training and fly into space. Of course, he had once worked for the space agency, and he had always dreamed of flying among the stars, and can't dreams come true? Today, he will blast off, the laughter long since subsided. His name is Yuri Baturin, and he is part of the two-man Russian crew that is flying American Dennis Tito to the International Space Station. Tito may be the first tourist in space, but Baturin has already distinguished himself as the first bureaucrat there.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 23, 2001
KOROLYOV, Russia -- The Mir space station streaked back to Earth early today as a molten blaze of metal and fire, harmlessly raking a swath of the South Pacific like a load of cosmic buckshot. The controlled descent, which ended Mir's 15-year career as an orbiting laboratory for Soviet and then Russian science, was managed with remarkable precision by the Russian space agency. Fifteen minutes before the scheduled splashdown, Russian officials announced that a U.S. ground station on Guam had confirmed that Mir was descending through the atmosphere according to plan, following a final burn of its retro-rocket system.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1999
When Icarus flew too close to the sun, the heat melted the wax that held his homemade wings together and sent him plummeting to his death.The sun's energy still poses significant, unseen hazards for those who fly too high.Take Russia's aging Mir space station. Launched 13 years ago, Mir has outlasted computer crashes, a fire, a collision with an unmanned supply ship, its five-year life expectancy and even the Soviet Union that designed and built it.More than 100 people, including seven U.S. astronauts, have visited Mir for research in science, engineering and long-term weightlessness.
NEWS
September 20, 1998
Freedom 7, America's first space capsule, will be on display in the Armel-Leftwich Visitor Center of the Naval Academy for five years, beginning Wednesday.The capsule will be on loan in Annapolis from the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum.Retired Navy Capt. James Lovell, commander of Apollo 13 and a 1952 graduate of the academy, will speak at 6 p.m. Sept. 28 at the visitor center.Also attending will be Marine Corps Maj. Gen. Charlie Bolden, veteran of four space shuttle missions, and Navy Cmdr.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | July 17, 1992
MOSCOW -- Russia and the United States want to launch a series of joint space ventures, ending 35 years of fearsomely intense rivalry.Under plans announced yesterday, an American astronaut would train in Russia and then fly on the Mir space station for five to six months -- a longer period than any American has been in space -- and a Russian cosmonaut would go up on the U.S. space shuttle. Later, a shuttle and the Mir would conduct a joint space mission.These flights could begin next year and extend into 1995, if the Russian and U.S. governments give final approval.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 1, 1998
MOSCOW -- A few months from now, an object will appear suddenly in the night sky and unfold glistening panels like an insect unfurling new wings.Slowly it will rotate and aim a blinding ray at Earth. The beam will roam over the globe's surface, seeking out population centers: southern Europe, Houston, maybe Los Angeles.It's the latest from the Mir space station. In a project that seems to borrow equally from James Bond and Flash Gordon, the Russians are preparing to place a huge mirror in orbit about 230 miles above Earth.
NEWS
February 20, 1999
U.S., Russia military agree to cooperate on Y2K bug solutionMOSCOW -- U.S. and Russian military experts agreed yesterday that they should act together to tackle the millennium computer bug amid uncertainty as to what effect the onset of the year 2000 would have on Russia's nuclear arsenal.Russia has begun to acknowledge that its military may be affected by the Y2K problem, but it is unclear where the cash-strapped country would get the funds or how it could solve the problem in only 10 months.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 24, 2001
MOSCOW - That was some symbol that went streaking through the sky over Fiji yesterday, breaking up into pieces and sizzling into the cool waters of the Pacific Ocean. The Mir space station went up as a symbol, and it came down as a symbol. In between it came to stand for perseverance, if nothing more. Perseverance by an intrepid series of cosmonauts and ground crews in the face of fire, collision, leaking air, collapsing finances, cultural conflict and personality clash. To the very end, there were Russians who wanted to keep Mir going as a manifestation of Russian prowess.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 23, 2001
KOROLYOV, Russia -- The Mir space station streaked back to Earth early today as a molten blaze of metal and fire, harmlessly raking a swath of the South Pacific like a load of cosmic buckshot. The controlled descent, which ended Mir's 15-year career as an orbiting laboratory for Soviet and then Russian science, was managed with remarkable precision by the Russian space agency. Fifteen minutes before the scheduled splashdown, Russian officials announced that a U.S. ground station on Guam had confirmed that Mir was descending through the atmosphere according to plan, following a final burn of its retro-rocket system.
TOPIC
By Frank D. Roylance | March 18, 2001
Sometime this week, the wispy atmosphere 68 miles above the Earth will begin to bend back the fragile solar panels on the Russian space station Mir - gently at first, like a dog's ears in the wind. But then it will rip them off, and break the obsolete, 148-ton Mir station into a formation of 1,500 white-hot, aluminum and titanium meteors. Whatever doesn't burn up or melt will be hell-bent for a deep-ocean grave in the remote southeastern Pacific. That's if the Russians' plans to ditch Mir go as advertised.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff | November 1, 1999
You don't have to buy a telescope to tour the universe. You don't even have to stand for hours in your freezing back yard to see cool stuff in the night sky.There is a galaxy of astronomy Web sites on the Internet. Some offer the latest, most beautiful images from the Hubble Space Telescope, and from spacecraft circling Jupiter and Mars.Others make it easy to predict when you can step out on your sidewalk for a few minutes to watch the space shuttle, the International Space Station (ISS) or Russia's Mir space station cruise over your head.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1999
When Icarus flew too close to the sun, the heat melted the wax that held his homemade wings together and sent him plummeting to his death.The sun's energy still poses significant, unseen hazards for those who fly too high.Take Russia's aging Mir space station. Launched 13 years ago, Mir has outlasted computer crashes, a fire, a collision with an unmanned supply ship, its five-year life expectancy and even the Soviet Union that designed and built it.More than 100 people, including seven U.S. astronauts, have visited Mir for research in science, engineering and long-term weightlessness.
NEWS
February 20, 1999
U.S., Russia military agree to cooperate on Y2K bug solutionMOSCOW -- U.S. and Russian military experts agreed yesterday that they should act together to tackle the millennium computer bug amid uncertainty as to what effect the onset of the year 2000 would have on Russia's nuclear arsenal.Russia has begun to acknowledge that its military may be affected by the Y2K problem, but it is unclear where the cash-strapped country would get the funds or how it could solve the problem in only 10 months.
NEWS
January 4, 1997
IT BECOMES CLEARER daily that the Russians aren't capable of fulfilling the ambitious role set for them in efforts to make space exploration international.Chronic fiscal problems left by the former Soviet Union are preventing Russia from meeting deadlines in construction of the space station. Funding may have been a factor in whatever technical problem caused Russia's Mars 96 spacecraft to fall back to Earth only hours after blasting off in November. The Russian probe was to be part of a three-pronged exploration of the Red Planet that included two U.S. probes which were successfully launched.
NEWS
April 27, 1997
APRIL HAS been a tough month for Russian space scientists. They celebrated the 36th anniversary of the first man in space (Yuri Gagarin) while acknowledging they work in a shadow of the program that accomplished that feat. Once proud of the envy their dominance in space exploration caused, Russians now cross their fingers the U.S. Congress won't cut their life line.It appears that won't happen. The House Science Committee has voted to continue funding of the space station, a joint venture whose construction has been delayed nearly a year because of the Russians.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 1, 1998
MOSCOW -- A few months from now, an object will appear suddenly in the night sky and unfold glistening panels like an insect unfurling new wings.Slowly it will rotate and aim a blinding ray at Earth. The beam will roam over the globe's surface, seeking out population centers: southern Europe, Houston, maybe Los Angeles.It's the latest from the Mir space station. In a project that seems to borrow equally from James Bond and Flash Gordon, the Russians are preparing to place a huge mirror in orbit about 230 miles above Earth.
NEWS
September 20, 1998
Freedom 7, America's first space capsule, will be on display in the Armel-Leftwich Visitor Center of the Naval Academy for five years, beginning Wednesday.The capsule will be on loan in Annapolis from the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum.Retired Navy Capt. James Lovell, commander of Apollo 13 and a 1952 graduate of the academy, will speak at 6 p.m. Sept. 28 at the visitor center.Also attending will be Marine Corps Maj. Gen. Charlie Bolden, veteran of four space shuttle missions, and Navy Cmdr.
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