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By ROB KASPER | July 19, 1997
LIKE A LOT OF guys who spend time in basement workshops, I have been following the news stories of "the guys in space," the two Russians and one American who have been trying to fix the damaged Mir space station.According to news accounts, they have attempted to make repairs while "crawling around in the clammy darkness" using only flashlights for illumination. They have battled a faulty air-conditioning system. And when something has gone wrong -- for instance, when one of the Mir guys accidentally unplugged a cable that sent the space station tumbling -- they have been subjected to endless second-guessing.
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By Amy Wilentz | December 30, 2007
I interviewed Benazir Bhutto just a month before she returned to Pakistan in October after almost 10 years in exile. I'd known her for years, on and off - mostly off - since we'd been in college together, and her brother, Mir Murtaza Bhutto, had been a good friend of mine there too. To be a Bhutto seemed - to us outsiders - the essence of glamorous progressivism. Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, their father, was the democratically inclined president of Pakistan, and we thought of the Bhutto family as Pakistan's Kennedys.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,Special to the Sun | March 18, 2001
If your idea of a vacation is an annual jaunt to Rehoboth or a week at Disney World, this probably isn't the trip for you. But several dozen well-heeled people who crave more original ways to spend their downtime will soar into the sky on a chartered jet sometime in the next week to watch Russia's Mir space station come tumbling down from a few hundred miles away. Trip organizers are promoting the event, expected to unfold somewhere over the South Pacific, as "a spectacular pyrotechnic display."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 27, 2007
Scientists working independently in Cambridge, England, and Cambridge, Mass., have discovered an unexpected regulatory network that affects the entire immune system. The regulatory network might provide new clues to the working of the body's defenses and the generation of a class of cancers known as lymphomas, which include Hodgkin's disease. The network depends on a genetic element known as a micro-RNA. RNA is the versatile chemical cousin of DNA; the micro snippets are too short to make genes but can interfere with the much longer messenger RNAs, which are transcribed from the DNA and used to direct the synthesis of proteins.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 26, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Ending weeks of suspense, NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin sent astronaut-scientist David Wolf up to the aging Russian spaceship Mir yesterday. He assured Wolf and an anxious public that the trip would be safe and productive.The space shuttle Atlantis was to launch Wolf and six fellow crewmen into orbit at 10: 30 p.m. yesterday from the Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral, Fla."When we weigh the potential benefits to America and humankind, we have no choice but to proceed," Goldin told a pre-launch press briefing at National Aeronautics and Space Administration headquarters in Washington.
FEATURES
By Rachel Elson and Rachel Elson,special to the sun | June 14, 1998
SAN FRANCISCO - It has sounded, at times, like the ultimate adventure trip gone haywire. Or maybe a deadly, space-age spinoff of "Gilligan's Island": Soar into the ether! See the world from 250 miles above the Earth! Brush up on your Russian as you battle fires, midair collisions, power failures and the deep, dark abyss of space itself!Over the last year and a half of joint U.S.-Russian missions on Mir - which ended last week when the shuttle picked up astronaut Andrew Thomas - the weary space station has become widely regarded as having the performance, safety and engineering of, well, a Ford Pinto.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 19, 1998
MOSCOW -- Patching up a battered space station is not rocket science.It's drills and wrenches and elbow grease and a certain intuition about machines -- all of which the Russian cosmonauts seem to have in abundance, the American astronaut David Wolf discovered when he got up to the dilapidated Mir."I didn't realize how much of a space station could be taken apart from the inside," he said yesterday on his first visit to Moscow since returning to Earth.Wolf spent 128 days on Mir, joining it in September after what he called "a kind of a run of bad luck" that had brought it punctures, power failures, a collision -- and headlines back on Earth.
NEWS
By THE BOSTON GLOBE | September 27, 2001
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Osama bin Laden has told his chosen biographer that Afghanistan's Taliban regime has as much right to weapons of mass destruction as the United States and that he has "purchased a lot of dangerous weapons, maybe chemical weapons," for the regime that shelters him. Hamid Mir, a Pakistani journalist picked by the alleged terrorist mastermind to write his biography, said he confronted bin Laden about Russian news reports that he...
NEWS
By Daniel S. Greenberg | October 1, 1997
TO UNDERSTAND NASA's decision to risk another astronaut in a long and purposeless ride on Russia's ramshackle Mir space station, it's enlightening to comprehend the weightlessness of American space policy.Permanently traumatized by the Challenger catastrophe, NASA has no stomach for Mir, a celestial hulk for which the controlling legal authority is Murphy's Law.But early in the Clinton administration, NASA was ordered to provide work for ex-Soviet space engineers, lest they find new careers in rogue countries.
NEWS
April 10, 2005
On April 7, 2005, JOHN B., beloved husband of the late Virginia Naditch; devoted father of Virginia Jachowski and husband Carroll, Jack Naditch, Kim Biro and husband Jack and Troy Fraley; loving grandfather of Sharon De Mir and James Gosnell; dear great-grandfather of Jennifer Lee, Amber Gosnell, Miranda De Mir, Brandon Ebaugh and Brooke Henderson. Relatives and friends may gather at MILLER-DIPPEL FUNERAL HOME, INC., 6415 Belair Road on Sunday only 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. A Funeral Service will be held on Monday at 10 A.M. Interment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens.
NEWS
April 10, 2005
On April 7, 2005, JOHN B., beloved husband of the late Virginia Naditch; devoted father of Virginia Jachowski and husband Carroll, Jack Naditch, Kim Biro and husband Jack and Troy Fraley; loving grandfather of Sharon De Mir and James Gosnell; dear great-grandfather of Jennifer Lee, Amber Gosnell, Miranda De Mir, Brandon Ebaugh and Brooke Henderson. Relatives and friends may gather at MILLER-DIPPEL FUNERAL HOME, INC., 6415 Belair Road on Sunday only 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. A Funeral Service will be held on Monday at 10 A.M. Interment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 24, 2004
Dr. Mir Ahmad Sarshar had practiced surgery for 40 years in Baltimore -- a noted hand specialist praised for his thorough, meticulous and gentle manner. He weighed retirement against the high cost of malpractice insurance and decided to stay on, colleagues said. Friday night, on Dulaney Valley Road north of Towson, Dr. Sarshar -- director of the hand section of Harbor Hospital's surgery department -- was killed in an automobile accident. He was 72. Police said Dr. Sarshar was driving south when a northbound car crossed the center turn lane into the path of his 1985 Mercedes-Benz.
NEWS
November 23, 2004
On November 19, 2004 MIR AHMAD SARSHAR, M.D., beloved husband of Roslyn M. Sarshar (nee Kronenberg); devoted father of Maryam Lisa Sarshar, Farah Maria Sarshar and Kamran Raymond Sarshar; loving grandfather of Jaleh Rose Najafali, Roya Marie Najafali and Reza Matthew Najafali. Also survived by his mother and five siblings. Friends may call at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Road (beltway exit 26A), on Tuesday from 3 to 7 P.M. Private services will be held at a later date.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John W. Kropf and John W. Kropf,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 13, 2002
With the wave of a meat ax and a smile, a young man in a bloody butcher's apron tries to entice me into buying a skinned sheep carcass. Careful not to offend, I smile and move briskly to the next stall. This is the start of my Saturday morning shopping grocery shop at the Mir Market Bazaar in Ashgabat, Turkmenistan. Two years ago, I might have complained about the long lines in American supermarkets or the paralyzing number of choices of cereal. But after two years as a State Department official in the central Asian country of Turkmenistan, bordered on the south by Iran and the west by Afghanistan, I've decided when I return to the United States, I'll stop complaining.
NEWS
By THE BOSTON GLOBE | September 27, 2001
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Osama bin Laden has told his chosen biographer that Afghanistan's Taliban regime has as much right to weapons of mass destruction as the United States and that he has "purchased a lot of dangerous weapons, maybe chemical weapons," for the regime that shelters him. Hamid Mir, a Pakistani journalist picked by the alleged terrorist mastermind to write his biography, said he confronted bin Laden about Russian news reports that he...
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 24, 2001
MOSCOW - That was some symbol that went streaking through the sky over Fiji yesterday, breaking up into pieces and sizzling into the cool waters of the Pacific Ocean. The Mir space station went up as a symbol, and it came down as a symbol. In between it came to stand for perseverance, if nothing more. Perseverance by an intrepid series of cosmonauts and ground crews in the face of fire, collision, leaking air, collapsing finances, cultural conflict and personality clash. To the very end, there were Russians who wanted to keep Mir going as a manifestation of Russian prowess.
NEWS
By Orlando Sentinel | March 21, 1995
American Astronaut Norman Thagard began his first day of work yesterday aboard the Russian space station Mir but found out he may be staying longer than planned.The Russians are running two weeks behind in their plans to send up a new module, or room, to connect with Mir in May. And NASA doesn't want to launch the space shuttle Atlantis, which will dock with Mir and bring Mr. Thagard home, until a month after the launch of the new module, called Spektr.So Atlantis' launch date, originally scheduled for May 24, is slipping until at least June and maybe later, NASA officials said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 5, 1995
SPACE CENTER, Houston -- Whirling through space at nearly five miles a second, American astronauts and Russian cosmonauts yesterday took apart the world's largest spacecraft easily and flawlessly as they had put it together five days ago, ending the first East-West linkup in two decades and clearing the way for future cooperative ventures.The elaborate disassembly began early yesterday as a Russian Soyuz spaceship carrying two Russian cosmonauts undocked from the sprawling space complex, made up of the 112-foot-long Russian space station Mir and 122-foot-long U.S. space shuttle Atlantis.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 23, 2001
KOROLYOV, Russia -- The Mir space station streaked back to Earth early today as a molten blaze of metal and fire, harmlessly raking a swath of the South Pacific like a load of cosmic buckshot. The controlled descent, which ended Mir's 15-year career as an orbiting laboratory for Soviet and then Russian science, was managed with remarkable precision by the Russian space agency. Fifteen minutes before the scheduled splashdown, Russian officials announced that a U.S. ground station on Guam had confirmed that Mir was descending through the atmosphere according to plan, following a final burn of its retro-rocket system.
TOPIC
By Frank D. Roylance | March 18, 2001
Sometime this week, the wispy atmosphere 68 miles above the Earth will begin to bend back the fragile solar panels on the Russian space station Mir - gently at first, like a dog's ears in the wind. But then it will rip them off, and break the obsolete, 148-ton Mir station into a formation of 1,500 white-hot, aluminum and titanium meteors. Whatever doesn't burn up or melt will be hell-bent for a deep-ocean grave in the remote southeastern Pacific. That's if the Russians' plans to ditch Mir go as advertised.
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