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By ROB KASPER | May 5, 1996
Mint is one tough herb. Late in April I start checking the ground to see if mint had made it through another winter. It rarely disappoints me. No matter how fierce Maryland winters are -- and this past one has been a doozy -- mint bounces back.I hunt for mint around this time of year for a very important reason: the mint julep, the official elixir of the Kentucky Derby. Yesterday was the first Saturday in May -- Kentucky Derby day. As the horses went to the starting gate in Louisville's Churchill Downs racetrack, I was sipping a mint julep in Maryland.
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By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
In the 12 years since it was designated an Arts & Entertainment District by the state government, Baltimore's Station North has blossomed. The amalgam of neighborhoods just north of Pennsylvania Station has become a destination for all things artsy and one of the city's hottest food areas. Bottega, a tiny BYOB that opened last year in the western corner of the district, is one of the restaurants attracting foodie crowds - and for good reason. The ever-changing menu, inspired by Tuscan flavors, manages to be creative without pretense.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
A stowaway slug that caught a free ride on a shipment of Mexican mint bound for Elkridge was intercepted at Washington Dulles International Airport as the first of its kind to be identified in the Washington region. Considered a threat to crops and human health, it was captured - and the mint destroyed. An entomologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed the Philomycidae slug was a "new pest" for the region, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials said Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
The days are getting shorter, and we're all struggling to settle back into our fall routines. Just when we needed it, there's Ananda, the thoroughly disarming, even magical, new Indian restaurant in the faraway kingdom of Maple Lawn in Howard County. You'll get up from your meal at Ananda, maybe a bit reluctantly - really, it's so cozy and comfortable here, you might want to linger - feeling refreshed, pleasantly full and extremely satisfied. I say pleasantly full because American diners can feel weighed down by Indian food.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY | March 27, 2009
The U.S. Mint has issued the country's first coin with readable Braille text, to honor Louis Braille. Part of the proceeds from sales of the commemorative bicentennial silver dollar, which will not be in general circulation, will support literacy efforts of the National Federation of the Blind, based in Baltimore, where the coin was unveiled Thursday. The coin features a portrait of Louis Braille on the heads side. On the tails side, a child is shown reading, with the abbreviation for Braille, "BRL," in Braille text above his head.
NEWS
By KEVIN HUNT and KEVIN HUNT,Hartford Courant | November 4, 2008
Just what this country needs to bring it together: a bipartisan music system that will not turn its back on a single iPod yet still address the nation's need to stream audio wirelessly from a computer. The Mint 220 Wireless Digital Music Station begins with an everyman iPod dock fronting two speakers. The Mint marks a new generation of speaker docks by adding a USB transmitter that mates with a PC or Mac for streaming audio up to 45 feet. This means you can connect the little USB transmitter to a computer in your den and stream music from your iTunes library to the Mint on a kitchen counter.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Johnston and Cheryl Johnston,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2003
A renaissance is not a renaissance without a band of artists producing artistic splendor under someone's patronage. The director of the U.S. Mint, Henrietta Holsman Fore, knows that. That's why she plans to invite artists this fall to join in the "renaissance of coin design and collecting" she says U.S. coins are currently enjoying. At the World's Fair of Money at the Baltimore Convention Center yesterday, Fore and the Mint shared details of plans for the first formal program for artists not employed by the Mint to design U.S. coins and medals.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2002
When the U.S. Mint launched its 50 States Quarters series in 1999, it seemed to have something irresistible: Give each state its own quarter, and have a local artist come up with a design for the "tails" side reflecting that state's history. Three years into the program, Mint spokesman Michael White declares it a success, noting that an estimated 139 million Americans collect the commemorative quarters. "This is teaching history through coinage," White said. "A lot of kids, for instance, can learn about the heritage of their state."
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 1, 2004
THE LETTUCE is stubby, the rabbits have already wiped out the beans, but the mint is thriving and the ponies are prancing in Louisville. Hot damn, honeylamb - it's Derby Day! Today is a day to forget, or ignore, the slings and arrows of life. Those would include the slow-moving drain, the new howl coming from the car engine, the battle that is gardening. Push such persistent sources of sorrow aside, pick a winner, pick some mint, make a julep. Around here, the first of May is not merely the start of a new month, it's the beginning of a whole new attitude.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler | July 7, 1991
Alan Rosen, the well-heeled dealer known as "Mr. Mint," has written a book on baseball cards.But be forewarned about "Mr. Mint's Insider's Guide to Investing in Baseball Cards and Collectibles" (with Doug Garr, Warner Books, 183 pages, $9.95). It's not quite what the title suggests.First, intermediate and advanced collectors should not be put off by the title. He does not treat non-investing collectors patronizingly. And there is sound advice for collectors, even if they shudder at the idea of collections being considered investments.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins and For The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Where exactly is the "south side" of the classic Southside cocktail? Bartenders themselves have troubling pinning down its origins. According to beverage lore, the drink could be named after the South Side of Chicago or the Southside Sportsmen's Club on Long Island, N.Y. - no one seems to be sure. Speculation only increases with its ingredients, since it can be made to order with vodka, gin or rum. But Ted Bauer, owner of the Valley Inn in Brooklandville, just north of the Beltway, confidently noted that Baltimore was an early adopter of the recipe, a summer favorite on the country club circuit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
The first day of summer will bring Grammy-winning singer Brandy and R&B veteran Johnny Gill to downtown Baltimore for this year's African American Festival, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced today at City Hall.  The free two-day festival will take place June 21-22 at the Camden Yards Sports & Entertainment Complex. The first day's performers include "R&B Divas" reality star and singer Monifah, Chico DeBarge, Jacob Latimore and the R&B/funk band Mint Condition.  On Sunday, Brandy and Gill will be joined by the Choir Boys and "Preachers of LA" cast member Deitrick Haddon.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
A stowaway slug that caught a free ride on a shipment of Mexican mint bound for Elkridge was intercepted at Washington Dulles International Airport as the first of its kind to be identified in the Washington region. Considered a threat to crops and human health, it was captured - and the mint destroyed. An entomologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed the Philomycidae slug was a "new pest" for the region, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials said Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
It's been open for less than a month, but The Nickel Taphouse has already established itself as a North Baltimore favorite. People have really taken to the new joint from Robbin Haas, whose Birroteca, which opened last fall, was a similar instant hit. The two places don't have much in common as far as cuisine. Birroteca serves rustic Italian food, while The Nickel Taphouse offers tavern fare. But the attitude is the same, and so is the extraordinary confidence governing every aspect of the restaurants' operations, starting with their physical design.
NEWS
July 29, 2013
A report last week by the federal Food and Drug Administration that menthol-flavored cigarettes pose a greater risk to public health than ordinary cigarettes signals that the agency may finally be prepared to regulate their sale or perhaps ban them altogether. It's long been known that smoking in general is a significant public health risk. Having concluded that menthol cigarettes can add to that risk even further, the agency should move quickly to protect the public from these dangerous products.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | July 23, 2013
Sometimes the better cocktails out there come not from studying the Web's vast repertoire of recipes or laying claim to bouts of inspiration. Often they come through the organic process of seeing what works and what doesn't for a particular person's taste - resulting in something really great. And great enough for everyone to try and enjoy, which Silo.5%'s bartender Dan Lease has crafted in the 3-2-1. Lease tells the tale of a couple who had moved into the Silo Point development who would frequent the bar and wanted to try something new: "Bourbon-based, and sweet.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 23, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Americans worried about their jobs and economic prospects are raiding their piggybanks and spare-change drawers - to the tune of billions of coins. The U.S. Mint, which produces all the coins in circulation, says that with the economic downturn the nation will consume vastly fewer new coins. It has begun laying off 357 workers in Philadelphia, San Francisco, Denver and other places to curtail coin production and protect its profits for the U.S. Treasury. The Mint believed as recently as this summer that the nation would need 23 billion new pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters in 2002.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Sarah Pekkanen and Michael Ollove and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1999
Heads or ... domes?George Washington's solemn profile, traditionally paired with a spread-winged eagle on the flip side of the U.S. quarter-dollar coin, will soon have a new partner -- at least temporarily.Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced yesterday that the back of a new Maryland-themed commemorative quarter, due out next spring, will feature the state's Capitol dome, a design by a 32-year-old White House graphic artist from Crofton.The sketch by William Krawczewicz triumphed over about 280 other entrants, including drawings of crabs and schoolchildren's crayoned depictions of the Bay Bridge.
FEATURES
By L'Oreal Thompson, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2013
Wedding date: May 4, 2013 Her story: Ashley Valis, 31, grew up in Baltimore. She is the assistant chief of staff for Gov. Martin O'Malley. Her mother, Beth Russell, is a director of marketing and sales, and her father, Jim Valis, is a sales director. His story: Jim Gillis, 31, grew up in Baltimore. He is an assistant state's attorney for Baltimore County. His mother, Kay Gillis, is retired, and his father, Dr. David Gillis, is deceased. Their story: Ashley and Jim met in July 2006 at an event for then-Mayor O'Malley's campaign for governor.
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