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By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | April 5, 1991
MOSCOW -- Tens of thousands of angry workers in the Byelorussian capital of Minsk shut down their factories and rallied yesterday to denounce price increases and demand the resignation of the Soviet leadership.In the first major protest in the Soviet Union since food and clothing prices more than doubled Tuesday, the Minsk workers drowned out Byelorussian Prime Minister Vyacheslav Kebich with jeers when he tried to address them. His government later agreed to negotiate with a citywide strike committee, Soviet television reported.
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NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 10, 2007
MOSCOW -- A Russian-Belarusian oil dispute that has shut down a key pipeline carrying crude oil to European customers might drag on long enough to force Russia to cut production, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin said yesterday. The bitter spat between the longtime allies led to a cutoff Monday in the flow of oil across Belarus, prompting complaints from European officials. A warm winter has left Europe with abundant oil supplies, triggering falling prices and keeping a lid on the severity of the continent's short-term worries about the cutoff.
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NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | December 17, 1991
A map in Tuesday's editions of The Sun transposed Latvia and Lithuania.MINSK -- Slow, dependable Minsk, patiently working away, had at last reached 1980 on its five-year plan when it was told last week that it had become a world capital.And it would not be just any capital. Here is where the once-fearsome Soviet Union would be refashioned into a friendly, cooperative Commonwealth of Independent States, led by Russia, Ukraine and Byelarus.The mere suggestion of such an overwhelming transformation might panic another provincial city, but not Minsk.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 28, 2006
KIEV, Ukraine -- Less than a year and a half ago, Viktor A. Yushchenko became president of Ukraine in a peaceful revolution and declared the beginning of a new political era that seemed destined to take firm hold and influence Ukraine's neighbors. He has been proved right, even as democratic change has followed a course that Yushchenko and promoters of civil society didn't expect. On Sunday, Yushchenko's party placed third in the first parliamentary elections since he became president.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | January 29, 1993
MINSK, Belarus -- A handful of people here have suddenly become minor celebrities, all because they befriended a lonely American named Lee Harvey Oswald more than 30 years ago.Oswald lived in Minsk for more than two years. He worked in a sprawling radio factory and married a local woman before returning to the United States in 1962, 18 months before the assassination of John F. Kennedy. Oswald was arrested in the shooting; two days later he was shot and killed by a bystander at the Dallas city jail.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 8, 1994
MINSK, Belarus -- The smallest British embassy in the world is illuminated by candles, because the electric light fixture on the ceiling is too loud.Add it to the list of woes in the former Soviet Union: overly loud light.Actually, this is a little bit of an exaggeration. The smallest British embassy in the world is not illuminated by candles, but by one candle. There isn't room for another.Just how small is this embassy? They can't issue visas here, it's so small. A Minskite (Minsker? Minskean?
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | August 5, 1992
MOSCOW -- The KGB kept close tabs on Lee Harvey Oswald while he was living in the Soviet Union, but his files show that the Soviet spy agency had no role in President John F. Kennedy's assassination, the head of state security in the republic of Belarus said yesterday.The files also suggest that Oswald was a notoriously poor marksman, said Eduard Shirkovsky, the security chief.Those files have remained classified, but Mr. Shirkovsky told a news conference in Minsk yesterday that the Parliament of Belarus could order them to be opened, the Itar-Tass news agency reported.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 10, 2001
MINSK, Belarus -- The dictatorial leader of Belarus claimed a crushing election victory early today over opponents who hoped to ease state control of the economy and end political repression. Election officials said last night that President Alexander Lukashenko held a lead of 78 percent, with three-quarters of the vote counted. Shortly after midnight, Lukashenko went on Belarus television to claim an "elegant victory." But Lukashenko's chief rival in the contest, Vladimir Goncharik, accused the president of election fraud.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Staff Writer | January 30, 1994
MINSK, Belarus -- The past is a treacherous place, shifting, yielding, disloyal. It belongs to the imagination. It belongs to the present. And it is different here now from what it once was.Two visions of the past, one light and one dark:The older one belongs to Ivan Misko, laureate of the State Prize of the Soviet Union, Honored Art Worker of the Republic of Belarus, sculptor. He devoted his long career to memorializing the most genuine of Soviet heroes, the cosmonauts, the pioneers of a new age.The newer vision belongs to Zyanon Paznyak, a bitter and obsessed man, unencumbered by prizes.
NEWS
April 9, 1999
Peter J. Pitchess, 87, who as Los Angeles County sheriff for 23 years transformed the largest U.S. sheriff's department from a rustic cowboy agency into a modern professional law enforcement organ- ization, died Sunday at his home in Newport Beach, Calif.Gary Blonston, 56, chief of the Knight Ridder Washington news bureau and a veteran reporter and editor, died Sunday of cancer in Washington. He was a principal writer on two Pulitzer Prize-winning projects: the Detroit Free Press coverage of the 1967 Detroit riots and the San Jose Mercury News' reporting of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 21, 2006
MINSK, Belarus -- International monitors declared Sunday's presidential election in Belarus invalid yesterday, as opposition activists in the capital organized a second night of protests and called for a new vote this summer. The Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe said the election that gave President Alexander Lukashenko a third term with nearly 83 percent of the vote was marred by irregularities in the counting of ballots after widespread harassment of opposition candidates.
NEWS
August 23, 2005
EVEN AS Russia and China pursue their wide-scale saber-rattling war games in the Far East, what is likely to be Moscow's next genuine flash point lies more than 4,000 miles to the west - in Belarus, one of Europe's worst-run nations. For more than a decade, Belarus has been under the thumb of dictator Alexander Lukashenko, who has kept himself in office through rigged elections, a controlled press, and the convenient disappearance of opponents. It is a nation, in other words, more than ripe for the sort of peaceful democratic revolution that arose last year in neighboring Ukraine.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | February 18, 2002
BOSTON - I arrive at my office, uncap my coffee, unwrap my bagel, open my e-mail and face the first searing public policy question of the day: "Do you want to watch teens make their first porn video?" Ah yes. Good Morning, Spam. Good Morning, Spamerica. This charming greeting is followed by a medical offer of a guaranteed deal to "lose 12 pounds in 48 hours!" That is followed by other golden opportunities for (1) a "pre-approved auto loan for up to $23,990"; (2) a nutritional supplement known as "horny goat weed"; (3)
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 10, 2001
MINSK, Belarus -- The dictatorial leader of Belarus claimed a crushing election victory early today over opponents who hoped to ease state control of the economy and end political repression. Election officials said last night that President Alexander Lukashenko held a lead of 78 percent, with three-quarters of the vote counted. Shortly after midnight, Lukashenko went on Belarus television to claim an "elegant victory." But Lukashenko's chief rival in the contest, Vladimir Goncharik, accused the president of election fraud.
NEWS
By RAFAEL ALVAREZ | April 25, 2001
IT'S FUNNY how the truth appears -- the real and righteous ring of truth that arrives with clarity and confusion and a sense that nothing will ever be the same. For lifelong Baltimorean Richard Ellsberry, truth made a cameo during a family vacation in Ocean City in the summer of 1970, when he was 16. Mr. Ellsberrry remembers standing near some trash cans outside of a rented cottage when his father made an astounding announcement as casually as if asking whether the Orioles were playing that night.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 4, 2000
WIMBLEDON, England - Vladimir Voltchkov, come on down. Jan-Michael Gambill, Alexander Popp and Byron Black, sign in please. It's time to join the new men's tennis game show, the march of the non-seeds into Wimbledon's quarterfinals. The no-names and anti-stars conquered Wimbledon yesterday, as Voltchkov, a 22-year-old qualifier from Belarus, ousted Wayne Ferreira, 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (7-0), leading one of the unlikeliest fourth-round tournament charges in recent memory. This was Wimbledon at its wackiest, non-seeds rolling through the draw, taut tennis dramas spread around the grounds, and the appearance of a 35-year-old male serial streaker, who paid a naked court call to watch Anna Kournikova in doubles.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 20, 1996
MINSK, Belarus -- With this former Soviet republic teetering on the brink of crisis, thousands of demonstrators marched through the streets yesterday to protest President Alexander Lukashenko's plan to gain near-absolute power.Against a backdrop of red-and-white banners, opposition leaders warned of an impending dictatorship and demanded that he drop his effort to rewrite Belarus' constitution.But Lukashenko had a message of his own.Early yesterday morning, army trucks and armored cars rumbled through Minsk as Lukashenko flexed his muscles before convening a meeting of supporters.
NEWS
April 9, 1999
Peter J. Pitchess, 87, who as Los Angeles County sheriff for 23 years transformed the largest U.S. sheriff's department from a rustic cowboy agency into a modern professional law enforcement organ- ization, died Sunday at his home in Newport Beach, Calif.Gary Blonston, 56, chief of the Knight Ridder Washington news bureau and a veteran reporter and editor, died Sunday of cancer in Washington. He was a principal writer on two Pulitzer Prize-winning projects: the Detroit Free Press coverage of the 1967 Detroit riots and the San Jose Mercury News' reporting of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | August 7, 1998
BOSTON -- Ever since it was discovered that Russell Weston Jr., the man charged with the Capitol murders, had a cabin in Rimini, Mont., we have been subject to yet another round of stories, titled loosely: There's something about Montana.What is it about the "last best place" that breeds, attracts or harbors the Freemen, the Kehoes, the Unabomber and the Westons? Psycho- and socio-babblers have all weighed in with theories about the isolation, the altitude, the power of myth.But I have come up with a much simpler and more logical explanation.
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