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NEWS
March 14, 2003
On March 8, 2003 MINOT K. MILLIKEN "KIM"; beloved husband of Marina Z. Milliken; devoted father of Laura J. Milliken, ESQ., Francesca F. Milliken, Emily E. Milliken, MD and Ian M. Milliken. He is also survived by four grandsons. A Memorial Service will be held at 11 A.M. on Saturday, March 15 in Guild Hall of the Cathedral Church of Incarnation, Charles St. & E. University Parkway. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the National Leiomyosarcoma Foundation, 61 Cherry St., Suite B Massapequa, NY 11758-5118
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BUSINESS
By Kathleen M. Howley and Kathleen M. Howley,BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 3, 2004
California had seven of the top 10 highest-priced U.S. real estate markets, led by La Jolla, Beverly Hills and Santa Barbara, while North Dakota had the cheapest, according to a recent study by Coldwell Banker Real Estate Corp. A $130,300 home in Minot, N.D., cost $1.71 million in La Jolla, according to the Home Price Comparison Index compiled from January to July by Coldwell Banker, which is owned by Cendant Corp. of New York. The index computed average sale prices for a 2,200- square-foot, four-bedroom home in 348 markets that were popular with transferring corporate executives.
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SPORTS
By Dan Williams and Dan Williams,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 2002
With a large fan base, full-time coaches and corporate sponsorships, college club hockey is much like a varsity sport minus the scholarships. It's serious hockey. The premier club teams will be on display today through Sunday in the American Collegiate Hockey Association's national tournament at the Gardens Ice House in Laurel. Towson will be the host of the tournament for the first time in the event's 13-year history. "People in general associate club sports with beer drinking and whoever shows up," Towson coach Marshall Stevenson said.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 14, 2003
MINOT, N.D. - Hemmed in by miles of peas, lentils and Durham wheat, the 36,000 residents of this town have better transportation choices than most in this part of the country. Minot sits at the junction of three interstate highways. It has a new airport that provides daily service. Still, for more than 70 years, its heartbeat has been defined by the visits of the Empire Builder, a passenger train now operated by Amtrak that twice each day - one train west, and one east - traces a 2,000-mile course across the prairie and mountains between Chicago and Seattle.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2002
Robert Schapiro was talking about the American Collegiate Hockey Association national tournament. He was impressed by the caliber of play. He loved Friday's overtime game between Iowa State and Ohio. He enjoyed the banter of the Penn State fans. But when Schapiro, a Cockeysville resident who works as a ticket taker at Camden Yards and a substitute teacher, thought about Iowa State's cheerleaders his eyes lit up. "Cheerleaders!" he said. "Did you see them? That's fascinating. I'm like any other man. I like to look at cheerleaders.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 14, 2003
MINOT, N.D. - Hemmed in by miles of peas, lentils and Durham wheat, the 36,000 residents of this town have better transportation choices than most in this part of the country. Minot sits at the junction of three interstate highways. It has a new airport that provides daily service. Still, for more than 70 years, its heartbeat has been defined by the visits of the Empire Builder, a passenger train now operated by Amtrak that twice each day - one train west, and one east - traces a 2,000-mile course across the prairie and mountains between Chicago and Seattle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna Rifkind and Donna Rifkind,Special to the Sun | November 7, 1999
Childhood and its perils, coincidentally, is the theme of all six novels this month. Walter Kirn's "Thumbsucker" (Anchor Books, 320 pages, $14) tries hard to offer a moving comic portrait of youth in crisis. Justin Cobb, Kirn's 14-year-old, orally fixated hero, is enduring a rocky Reagan-era adolescence in a small Minnesota town. His dad's an ex-football star turned hyper-macho survivalist, who keeps dead woodcocks in the freezer and refers to his family as "you people." Filled with loathing for this ranting authority figure, Justin also resents his little brother, a jock with a secret fetish for designer clothes, while harboring a hopeless crush on his vague, ethereal mother.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2003
Author Susan Minot is more comfortable exploring the interior lives of characters in her novels than sharing details of her own life with the public. But she knows readers enjoy connecting with the people behind the pages. "To read from your work or talk about it puts a slightly more familiar face in it," she said. "When you encounter writers just with their work, it lacks that actual, personal, `in the world' dimension." This week, Minot shared her thoughts on writing, with her prose and poetry, at the Supper at Six benefit dinner at Elkridge Furnace Inn. As a popular social event for area book clubs and a chance for readers to meet big names in the literary world, the annual event has earned a following over the past five years.
BUSINESS
By Kathleen M. Howley and Kathleen M. Howley,BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 3, 2004
California had seven of the top 10 highest-priced U.S. real estate markets, led by La Jolla, Beverly Hills and Santa Barbara, while North Dakota had the cheapest, according to a recent study by Coldwell Banker Real Estate Corp. A $130,300 home in Minot, N.D., cost $1.71 million in La Jolla, according to the Home Price Comparison Index compiled from January to July by Coldwell Banker, which is owned by Cendant Corp. of New York. The index computed average sale prices for a 2,200- square-foot, four-bedroom home in 348 markets that were popular with transferring corporate executives.
NEWS
By Tom Majeski and Tom Majeski,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 16, 1992
ST. PAUL, Minn. -- An 18-year-old North Dakota man whose arms were severed in a farm accident and who then sat in a bathtub so he wouldn't bleed on his mother's carpet is recovering this week after surgeons reattached his limbs.If everything continues to improve for John Thompson, whose surgery at North Memorial Medical Center in Robbinsdale, Minn., took place Saturday, his will be one of the few successful double arm reattachments in U.S. history.Infection will be a major concern for five to 10 days, hospital spokeswoman Maggie Drury said.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2003
Author Susan Minot is more comfortable exploring the interior lives of characters in her novels than sharing details of her own life with the public. But she knows readers enjoy connecting with the people behind the pages. "To read from your work or talk about it puts a slightly more familiar face in it," she said. "When you encounter writers just with their work, it lacks that actual, personal, `in the world' dimension." This week, Minot shared her thoughts on writing, with her prose and poetry, at the Supper at Six benefit dinner at Elkridge Furnace Inn. As a popular social event for area book clubs and a chance for readers to meet big names in the literary world, the annual event has earned a following over the past five years.
NEWS
March 14, 2003
On March 8, 2003 MINOT K. MILLIKEN "KIM"; beloved husband of Marina Z. Milliken; devoted father of Laura J. Milliken, ESQ., Francesca F. Milliken, Emily E. Milliken, MD and Ian M. Milliken. He is also survived by four grandsons. A Memorial Service will be held at 11 A.M. on Saturday, March 15 in Guild Hall of the Cathedral Church of Incarnation, Charles St. & E. University Parkway. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the National Leiomyosarcoma Foundation, 61 Cherry St., Suite B Massapequa, NY 11758-5118
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2002
Robert Schapiro was talking about the American Collegiate Hockey Association national tournament. He was impressed by the caliber of play. He loved Friday's overtime game between Iowa State and Ohio. He enjoyed the banter of the Penn State fans. But when Schapiro, a Cockeysville resident who works as a ticket taker at Camden Yards and a substitute teacher, thought about Iowa State's cheerleaders his eyes lit up. "Cheerleaders!" he said. "Did you see them? That's fascinating. I'm like any other man. I like to look at cheerleaders.
SPORTS
By Dan Williams and Dan Williams,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 2002
With a large fan base, full-time coaches and corporate sponsorships, college club hockey is much like a varsity sport minus the scholarships. It's serious hockey. The premier club teams will be on display today through Sunday in the American Collegiate Hockey Association's national tournament at the Gardens Ice House in Laurel. Towson will be the host of the tournament for the first time in the event's 13-year history. "People in general associate club sports with beer drinking and whoever shows up," Towson coach Marshall Stevenson said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna Rifkind and Donna Rifkind,Special to the Sun | November 7, 1999
Childhood and its perils, coincidentally, is the theme of all six novels this month. Walter Kirn's "Thumbsucker" (Anchor Books, 320 pages, $14) tries hard to offer a moving comic portrait of youth in crisis. Justin Cobb, Kirn's 14-year-old, orally fixated hero, is enduring a rocky Reagan-era adolescence in a small Minnesota town. His dad's an ex-football star turned hyper-macho survivalist, who keeps dead woodcocks in the freezer and refers to his family as "you people." Filled with loathing for this ranting authority figure, Justin also resents his little brother, a jock with a secret fetish for designer clothes, while harboring a hopeless crush on his vague, ethereal mother.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Peter Spiegel,Los Angeles Times | October 20, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Air Force weapons officers assigned to secure nuclear warheads failed on five separate occasions to examine a bundle of cruise missiles headed to a B-52 bomber in North Dakota, leading the plane's crew to unknowingly fly six nuclear-armed missiles across the country. That August flight, the first known incident in which the U.S. military lost track of its nuclear weapons since the dawn of the atomic age, lasted nearly three hours, until the bomber landed at Barksdale Air Force Base in northern Louisiana.
NEWS
By Aamer Madhani and Aamer Madhani,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 6, 2008
WASHINGTON - The Air Force's top civilian and chief officer were forced to resign yesterday after Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates concluded that the service was lacking proper leadership in overseeing the U.S. nuclear arsenal. Gates pointed to a failure of leadership in the Air Force's top echelon, including Chief of Staff Gen. Michael Moseley and Air Force Secretary Michael Wynne, as he announced the shake-up at the Pentagon. Earlier this year, it was revealed that the Air Force mistakenly sent a shipment of fuses for nuclear missiles to Taiwan in 2006 in the place of helicopter batteries.
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