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Minority Students

NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 12, 1990
The U.S. Department of Education has decided to begin prohibiting colleges and universities that receive federal funds from offering scholarships designated for minority students.Michael L. Williams, the Education Department's assistant secretary for civil rights, said yesterday that "race-exclusive" scholarships were discriminatory and therefore illegal.College administrators and scholarship fund directors reacted with alarm, saying that the decision could reverse decades of efforts to increase the enrollment of members of racial and ethnic minorities who have been historically underrepresented in colleges.
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NEWS
April 18, 1991
Hood College in Frederick has been awarded a $40,000 grant from the New York Times Foundation to provide scholarship support to minority students from the New York area.The grant will be used to support recruitment efforts in the New York area.
NEWS
February 28, 2012
New rules on school gifted and talented programs approved today by the state board of education have drawn fire from a coalition of groups that say such programs harm poor and minority students. The critics, which include Casa de Maryland and the Montgomery County NAACP, argue that the very act of labeling some students and not others as gifted creates winners and losers, and that the principal victims of such inequality are African-Americans, Hispanics and students from low-income families.
NEWS
By David A. Love | April 11, 2001
I'M AN African-American who is the beneficiary of affirmative action. I find the recent federal court decision ordering the University of Michigan Law School to dismantle its affirmative-action program disturbing. I was able to take advantage of educational opportunities, first by attending Harvard College and Harvard Business School and now the University of Pennsylvania Law School. I know I was qualified for admission at all three institutions, where I and other minority students have done well.
NEWS
February 12, 1996
John Pfeiffer, 75, who produced recordings by some of classical music's most famous artists, including Van Cliburn, Jascha Heifetz and Arturo Toscanini, in a 50-year career, died Thursday of a heart attack at his New York office.Affleck Gray, 89, a Scottish mountaineer, author and expert on the legendary Big Gray Man of Ben MacDhui, died Wednesday.The Rev. Frank C. Carr, 73, who gave up a publishing career to start a program for minority students, died Wednesday in Yuma, Ariz. Mr. Carr founded INROADS, a nonprofit college preparatory and career-development organization for minority students, in 1970.
FEATURES
By Laura Charles | November 17, 1991
Invited guests gathered Nov. 10 at Towson State University for a reception hosted by TSU president Hoke Smith in honor of Charles "Roc" Dutton, actor and former TSU student. Mr. Dutton, who stars in Fox Broadcasting's comedy "Roc," was in town to launch the Charles Dutton Theatre Scholarship Endowment for Minority Students at TSU and to appear later that night in a one-man Shakespeare show.7/8
NEWS
September 29, 1992
Dr. Stuart D. Berger might have been hired to make waves in Baltimore County, but for now he enjoys a honeymoon period in his new post as superintendent of county schools.Since taking the job three months ago, he has advanced several innovative proposals, including an all-day kindergarten, an elementary-school experiment in which letter grades are not given and an arts high school. Yet, at this early stage, many observers are waiting to see how far Dr. Berger actually goes. Will he tinker with the school system or perform a major overhaul?
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 18, 1993
Black and Hispanic students are still far less likely to attend college than white students, according to a report released today by the American Council on Education.The 11th Annual Status Report on Minorities in Higher Education swings from weak optimism to deep gloom as it outlines the past year as well as the 1980s. The report is considered one of the most comprehensive and telling portraits of a crucial segment of education.The report shows that minority students are far less likely to finish high school than white students.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | January 2, 2008
Konyinsola Oshikoya, a 14-year-old sophomore at Howard County's Oakland Mills High School, is always on the lookout for new members of the Alpha Achievers. "If I see someone in the hall who I think should be there, I'll pull them aside," Konyinsola said. That kind of commitment has allowed the organization, which encourages excellence among minority students, to spread to five Howard County high schools over the past 10 years. As school systems struggle to close the student achievement gap, programs like the Alpha Achievers are growing in popularity.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Mary Maushard and Marilyn McCraven and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1996
Elijah E. Cummings looked heavenward and cried: "Martin, can you believe I'm here at Roland Park Country School and we're celebrating your birthday?"The passionate remark by the 7th District congressman -- delivered at Roland Park's Martin Luther King Jr. Day breakfast in January -- could have been made at a number of Baltimore's top private schools. Although they integrated a generation ago, only in the past year or two has minority enrollment risen to a level where campus culture is changing -- inside and outside the classroom.
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