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NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | January 2, 2008
Konyinsola Oshikoya, a 14-year-old sophomore at Howard County's Oakland Mills High School, is always on the lookout for new members of the Alpha Achievers. "If I see someone in the hall who I think should be there, I'll pull them aside," Konyinsola said. That kind of commitment has allowed the organization, which encourages excellence among minority students, to spread to five Howard County high schools over the past 10 years. As school systems struggle to close the student achievement gap, programs like the Alpha Achievers are growing in popularity.
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NEWS
February 12, 1996
John Pfeiffer, 75, who produced recordings by some of classical music's most famous artists, including Van Cliburn, Jascha Heifetz and Arturo Toscanini, in a 50-year career, died Thursday of a heart attack at his New York office.Affleck Gray, 89, a Scottish mountaineer, author and expert on the legendary Big Gray Man of Ben MacDhui, died Wednesday.The Rev. Frank C. Carr, 73, who gave up a publishing career to start a program for minority students, died Wednesday in Yuma, Ariz. Mr. Carr founded INROADS, a nonprofit college preparatory and career-development organization for minority students, in 1970.
FEATURES
By Laura Charles | November 17, 1991
Invited guests gathered Nov. 10 at Towson State University for a reception hosted by TSU president Hoke Smith in honor of Charles "Roc" Dutton, actor and former TSU student. Mr. Dutton, who stars in Fox Broadcasting's comedy "Roc," was in town to launch the Charles Dutton Theatre Scholarship Endowment for Minority Students at TSU and to appear later that night in a one-man Shakespeare show.7/8
NEWS
September 29, 1992
Dr. Stuart D. Berger might have been hired to make waves in Baltimore County, but for now he enjoys a honeymoon period in his new post as superintendent of county schools.Since taking the job three months ago, he has advanced several innovative proposals, including an all-day kindergarten, an elementary-school experiment in which letter grades are not given and an arts high school. Yet, at this early stage, many observers are waiting to see how far Dr. Berger actually goes. Will he tinker with the school system or perform a major overhaul?
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 18, 1993
Black and Hispanic students are still far less likely to attend college than white students, according to a report released today by the American Council on Education.The 11th Annual Status Report on Minorities in Higher Education swings from weak optimism to deep gloom as it outlines the past year as well as the 1980s. The report is considered one of the most comprehensive and telling portraits of a crucial segment of education.The report shows that minority students are far less likely to finish high school than white students.
NEWS
March 5, 2012
Educators have known for some time that simply kicking troublesome kids out of school rarely solves the problem. When those students come back, the problems that caused them to be suspended or expelled from school come right back with them. The state board of education recognized that reality this week in a proposal aimed at getting school systems to cut the number of out-of-school suspensions and limit the number of days students can be kept out of class. Under the board's plan, suspension for minor, nonviolent infractions such as using a cellphone during school hours or talking back to a teacher would be available only as the punishment of last resort.
NEWS
October 9, 2012
The U.S. Supreme Court takes up the issue of racial preference in college admissions on Wednesday, and that ought to be a concern for those who believe such policies have provided countless opportunities for minorities - and enriched the educational experience for whites. There is a growing movement in this country to eliminate affirmative action on the grounds that it's no longer needed - or was even helpful in the first place. Granted, this can be a complex issue, and even the most liberal interpretations of the race-conscious policy acknowledge that a balance must be struck to make colleges diverse but also keep the admissions process fair and merit-based.
NEWS
August 23, 2013
Excuses, accusations and explanations abound for why there are minority students who can graduate from high school but do not succeed in college ("Unequal outcomes," Aug. 19). Some of the many reasons I have read include inferior public school teachers, poor curriculum, old textbooks, racial bias, bad neighborhoods, lack of two-parent family, school dress, mixed-gender classrooms and on and on. Maybe some of these are legitimate, but one reason that is not discussed is whether students want to be in college in the first place.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1996
Some Ellicott City parents are concerned about how a preliminary boundary line proposal for the new Hollifield Station Elementary School would affect the racial and socioeconomic balance among elementary schools in the area.Hollifield Station, scheduled to open next fall, is being built off Rogers Avenue in Ellicott City.The parents question whether the boundary lines would create disparities in the percentages of minority and low-income students at Hollifield and two other area elementary schools.
NEWS
By SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER | August 19, 1998
BERKELEY, Calif. -- Minority enrollment at the University of California at Berkeley Law School will increase slightly in this year compared with a year ago, admissions officials said.As the law school approaches a second year without affirmative action in admissions, officials announced that minority admissions will be up 32 over what they were at the beginning of the 1997-1998 school year.The increase brings the number of minority students enrolled at the law school to 85 of the total 275 students.
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