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By Childs Walker | childs.walker@baltsun.com | December 4, 2009
A new report on university systems from 24 states, including Maryland, shows that low-income and minority students are not as well represented among those entering and graduating from four-year colleges as they are among high school graduates. The report, released Thursday by The Education Trust and the National Association of System Heads, shows that low-income students represented 27 percent of high school graduates in Maryland and only 20 percent of university freshmen. Minority students made up 38 percent of high school graduates and 37 percent of freshmen enrolling in four-year universities.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
The overwhelming majority of Maryland's high school graduates are passing state assessments needed to obtain a diploma, according to data released Wednesday by the state Department of Education, though gaps persist between minority students and their peers. Roughly 59,500 students in the Class of 2013 completed high school, with nearly 90 percent passing the High School Assessments, which are required for graduation and are administered in English, algebra and biology. No student failed to graduate because of failing to meet the requirement.
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NEWS
By DONALD E. WILSON | February 25, 1993
In 1969, African-Americans made up approximately 6 percent ofthe freshman class in U.S. medical schools. In 1991, that percentage had risen to only 6.6 percent. For nearly 20 years, the number of African-American students entering medical school has remained static, with almost one-third concentrated in 10 medical schools.Last year, the Association of American Medical Colleges launched ''Project 3000 by 2000,'' an effort to nearly double the number of minority students enrolled in medical schools by the turn of the century.
NEWS
August 23, 2013
Excuses, accusations and explanations abound for why there are minority students who can graduate from high school but do not succeed in college ("Unequal outcomes," Aug. 19). Some of the many reasons I have read include inferior public school teachers, poor curriculum, old textbooks, racial bias, bad neighborhoods, lack of two-parent family, school dress, mixed-gender classrooms and on and on. Maybe some of these are legitimate, but one reason that is not discussed is whether students want to be in college in the first place.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | December 16, 1990
WESTMINSTER - Western Maryland College officials, who want to boost minority recruitment on the predominantly white campus, say they are concerned about a federal order banning scholarships directed at minority students.A U.S. Department of Education official said last week that colleges and universities that receive federal dollars are barred by civil rights law from granting scholarships limited by race.The apparent policy shift could imperil an undetermined number of scholarship programs designed to benefit minorities, civil rights and college officials said.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,Staff Writer | June 25, 1992
Students from 14 area high schools knew something serious was going on when Jacqueline Frierson told them to remove their hats and chewing gum."If I hurt your feelings or step on your toes -- good. It'll make you think, and we have to be a thinking people," said the doctoral student from Morgan State University, currently interning at Westinghouse Electric Corp.The audience of 40 students listened attentively as Frierson and Jonathan Oliver, a former engineering student at Anne Arundel Community College, spoke during the conclusion of a three-day Minority Orientation to Engineering and Technologies Career Opportunities Upreach program yesterday.
NEWS
November 27, 1998
THE BAD NEWS for poor and minority youngsters wanting to go to college just got worse.A recent study has reaffirmed that the cost of higher education continues to climb, making it more unaffordable for low-income families. The study was done for the Institute for Higher Education Policy and the Education Resources Institute.That news, combined with the assault on affirmative action that has resulted in enrollment declines, means that fewer blacks, Latinos and other nonwhites will be seen on the nation's campuses.
NEWS
By Bernetha George | March 17, 1996
The Baltimore County Chapter of the NAACP opposed the selection of Anthony G. Marchione to head the county schools. The Sun invited the NAACP and Dr. Marchione to comment on the controversy. Dr. Marchione declined. THE BALTIMORE County Branch of the NAACP, in keeping with its purpose to improve the educational status of minority groups, took a position regarding the status of African-American youngsters in the Baltimore County School system.Although African-American students were singled out, the condition of most minority students in the Baltimore County school system is dismal.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2001
Western Maryland College wants to increase its minority student population and hopes to use a scholarship fund to do so. Created with a $100,000 grant from the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, the Hearst Endowed Scholarship Fund will begin assisting U.S.-born minority students who attend the Westminster school in the fall. "We're tremendously excited," said Steve P. Krahling-Haddad, director of corporate and foundation relations at Western Maryland College in Westminster. This "validates the work we've been doing over the last 10 years."
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2001
Western Maryland College wants to increase its minority student population and hopes to use a scholarship fund to do so. Created with a $100,000 grant from the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, the Hearst Endowed Scholarship Fund will begin assisting U.S.-born minority students who attend the Westminster school in the fall. "We're tremendously excited," said Steve P. Krahling-Haddad, director of corporate and foundation relations at Western Maryland College in Westminster. This "validates the work we've been doing over the last 10 years."
NEWS
August 21, 2013
It's really no surprise that top students at Maryland's highest-performing high schools are passing the Advanced Placement exams at rates far higher than their peers in the state's lower-performing schools. The test results reflect not just how much students have learned over the previous year in an AP class but how well their entire school experience has prepared them for college-level work. That's why raising AP pass rates across the board isn't just a matter of better facilities or teaching methods in a handful of advanced high school courses.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
The College Board reports that Maryland high school students again led the country last year in their pass rate on Advanced Placement tests. Even better, the board reported that more African-American students earned passing scores than ever before. That Maryland has been able to increase the number and diversity of students taking AP classes while continuing to see rising test scores is a hopeful sign as the state stands poised to adopt a more challenging curriculum. Last year, 29.6 percent of Maryland high seniors passed at least one of the AP exams, which are offered in 34 subjects including chemistry, calculus, English literature, history and foreign languages.
NEWS
October 9, 2012
The U.S. Supreme Court takes up the issue of racial preference in college admissions on Wednesday, and that ought to be a concern for those who believe such policies have provided countless opportunities for minorities - and enriched the educational experience for whites. There is a growing movement in this country to eliminate affirmative action on the grounds that it's no longer needed - or was even helpful in the first place. Granted, this can be a complex issue, and even the most liberal interpretations of the race-conscious policy acknowledge that a balance must be struck to make colleges diverse but also keep the admissions process fair and merit-based.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2012
Baltimore City Community College has received a $600,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to help prepare minority students for careers in science, technology, engineering and math. The grant, announced Monday by Sens. Barbara A. Mikulski and Ben Cardin, will fund 126 scholarships over a five-year period for programs such as robotics and computer-aided design and drafting. In announcing the grant, Mikulski said she is "so proud of BCCC's leadership in preparing today's students for tomorrow's careers.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for highs in the lower 60s and a chance for afternoon showers. Lows are expected to be in the upper 40s tonight. TRAFFIC Check our traffic map for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT... Three arrested in May 2011 shooting of 12-year-old boy : Police said Danyae Robinson, 29; Antwan Mosley, 21; and Derrick E. Brown, 17, have each been charged with murder and three counts of attempted murder after being arrested by the warrant apprehension task force.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
Freeman A. Hrabowski III, the longtime president of the University of Maryland Baltimore County whose trailblazing work in educating minority students in the sciences has catapulted the university onto the national stage, has been recognized as one of the most influential leaders in the world. Hrabowski will join a renowned crowd of dignitaries, foreign heads of state, celebrities, activists and other reformers on Time magazine's 2012 Top 100 Most Influential People, due to be released Wednesday.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 30, 1996
A $2 million grant from Toyota Motor Corp. will enable the Chesapeake Bay Foundation to expand its environmental education programs and to reach additional minority students in major cities, the group said yesterday.The foundation said it plans to use the three-year Toyota grant to arrange field trips and community projects for 3,250 minority students in Baltimore, Washington, Richmond, Va., and Norfolk, Va.Foundation educators take 35,000 students and teachers on the bay each year, canoeing in tidal creeks and marshes or cruising aboard skipjacks and other boats.
NEWS
March 5, 2012
Educators have known for some time that simply kicking troublesome kids out of school rarely solves the problem. When those students come back, the problems that caused them to be suspended or expelled from school come right back with them. The state board of education recognized that reality this week in a proposal aimed at getting school systems to cut the number of out-of-school suspensions and limit the number of days students can be kept out of class. Under the board's plan, suspension for minor, nonviolent infractions such as using a cellphone during school hours or talking back to a teacher would be available only as the punishment of last resort.
NEWS
February 28, 2012
New rules on school gifted and talented programs approved today by the state board of education have drawn fire from a coalition of groups that say such programs harm poor and minority students. The critics, which include Casa de Maryland and the Montgomery County NAACP, argue that the very act of labeling some students and not others as gifted creates winners and losers, and that the principal victims of such inequality are African-Americans, Hispanics and students from low-income families.
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