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NEWS
May 23, 1993
The Clinton administration may be on the verge of undermining federal enforcement of civil rights after 12 years of Reagan-Bush neglect and regression. Instead of restoring the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division to its proper role as vigorous guardian of minority rights, it is about to embroil that beleaguered office in a troubling quarrel. President Clinton has nominated a brilliant but provocative law professor, Lani Guinier, to become assistant attorney general in charge of civil rights.
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | December 1, 2013
Ehrlich: "It's time for all of us oppressed minorities to rise up!" I'm usually not one to degrade my former profession. I still believe public service to be a noble career path. But this week I'm going to make an exception. Last month's events in the U.S. Senate provide the context. The issue concerns the Senate filibuster, that ultimate legislative tool of the minority party. The heretofore sacrosanct parliamentary maneuver had been much discussed in the recent past, particularly the notion that a "nuclear option" (degrading the filibuster)
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NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | February 26, 1993
London. -- It was Mahatma Gandhi who used to say that one could assess civilization by the manner in which it dealt with minorities. Ralf Dahrendorf, the eminence grise of European education, more recently made a similar point in an address before that remarkable London campaigning power-house, the Minority Rights Group (which shows what can be done by two people, a phone, a fax and a secretary).''Defense of minority rights is the litmus test of liberty and the rule of law,'' Professor Dahrendorf said, and went on wryly to note: ''Ruling interests and beliefs need no protection; power protects, though it may corrupt as well.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
Miguel Tejada donned his Orioles uniform and warm-up jacket for one final time this season and joined his now ex-teammates on the field at Kauffman Stadium for the pre-game stretch. He went from player to player, delivering hugs and handshakes before returning to the clubhouse to pack his belongings. A pennant race awaits Tejada, whom the Orioles traded Thursday for the second time in three years. This time, Tejada was sent to the National League West-leading San Diego Padres for minor league right-handed pitcher Wynn Pelzer in a move that not only saves the Orioles money, but also allows them to evaluate prospect Josh Bell at third base for the rest of the season.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 21, 1999
WASHINGTON -- In a fresh sign of the deteriorating climate in the Senate, party leaders traded accusations of racial insensitivity yesterday.Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle, a South Dakota Democrat, opened fire with the charge that a Republican move to block confirmation of former Sen. Carol Moseley-Braun to an ambassadorial post reflects a "defiant" pattern of GOP insensitivity to minority rights.Besides the effort against Moseley-Braun, a Democrat who was the first black female senator, Daschle noted the rejection or delay of black, female and Hispanic judicial candidates, and resistance to a program designed to increase private lending in low-income and minority communities.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | April 24, 1991
Symbols and what they stand for have us constantly wrestling with ourselves over what's legal, what's logical and what's right. It's easy to blame judges for the confusion.In Fairfax County, across the river from Washington, a judge rules that the Virginia law against cross-burning is unconstitutional. In Greenville, South Carolina, a federal judge tells students they can wear the Confederate flag to school, but only after the school year is over.Historically, the burning cross is a symbol of the Ku Klux Klan, of racial hatred and violence.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | December 1, 2013
Ehrlich: "It's time for all of us oppressed minorities to rise up!" I'm usually not one to degrade my former profession. I still believe public service to be a noble career path. But this week I'm going to make an exception. Last month's events in the U.S. Senate provide the context. The issue concerns the Senate filibuster, that ultimate legislative tool of the minority party. The heretofore sacrosanct parliamentary maneuver had been much discussed in the recent past, particularly the notion that a "nuclear option" (degrading the filibuster)
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | July 3, 1991
Washington -- AMONG THE post-mortems on President Bush's appointment of Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court is the view that the creation of a court so clearly weighted with conservatives will hand the Democrats a political shooting gallery in 1992. This argumepublican creation now bent on turning the clock back on individual rights and barring any extension of them against government intrusion.Doubtless there will be those liberal Democrats who will seize what they will see as an opportunity to make that case, which on the basis of the behavior of the court in its last term has considerable validity, even before the Thomas appointment.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | February 19, 1993
London.--It was President Woodrow Wilson who, at the end of the First World War, threw that great secessionist fragmentation bomb, the principle of the self-determination of nations, into the arena of public debate. ''Every people should be left free to determine its own polity,'' he told the American Congress.Nearly eight decades later we have a new American secretary of state, Warren Christopher, worrying, ''If we don't find some way that different ethnic groups can live together in a country, how many countries will we have?
NEWS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,Contributing Writer | October 22, 1993
DUNAJSKA STREDA, Slovakia -- Karoly Hodossy's family name dates back a half-millennium, but it's new to him, and he wants to keep it.Two years ago, Mr. Hodossy -- an ethnic Hungarian living in Slovakia -- changed his name from Hodosi, the Slovak spelling. Now he's afraid he may be forced to change it back again."The name Hodossy is 500 years old, but in 1919 the Slovaks made my great-grandfather change the spelling," said Mr. Hodossy, who works in the local City Hall. "In Slovakia, the Slovaks are the boss, and we Hungarians have to do what they say."
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | May 5, 2009
SALISBURY -It's not easy to be the answer to a trivia question. But Ryan Minor, the man who replaced Cal Ripken Jr. on Sept. 20, 1998, and ended his consecutive-games streak at 2,632, is at peace with his place in baseball history, even if it comes up while he's eating dinner on the road. "You hear that question asked a ton," Minor says as he sits in the dugout of his employer, the Single-A Delmarva Shorebirds. "And people don't even realize you're sitting there and you're the guy that played that night.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,Sun Reporter | August 23, 2007
As he prepared to manage his first major league game two months ago, Dave Trembley was aware that many miles away, Orioles officials were interviewing Joe Girardi for a job that Trembley didn't figure to hold for long. But from his debut June 19 in San Diego all the way to this past Saturday, when president of baseball operations Andy MacPhail told Trembley before dinner at a Toronto restaurant that he wanted him to be the team's manager next season, Trembley vowed to do things his way. And that won't change even though the longtime baseball man's life suddenly has. The Orioles announced yesterday that Trembley's contract has been extended through the 2008 season, with a club option for 2009.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 21, 1999
WASHINGTON -- In a fresh sign of the deteriorating climate in the Senate, party leaders traded accusations of racial insensitivity yesterday.Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle, a South Dakota Democrat, opened fire with the charge that a Republican move to block confirmation of former Sen. Carol Moseley-Braun to an ambassadorial post reflects a "defiant" pattern of GOP insensitivity to minority rights.Besides the effort against Moseley-Braun, a Democrat who was the first black female senator, Daschle noted the rejection or delay of black, female and Hispanic judicial candidates, and resistance to a program designed to increase private lending in low-income and minority communities.
NEWS
February 17, 1999
U.S. intelligence hunting the elusive terrorist Osama bin Laden will eat its heart out at Turkey's pursuit of the Kurdish rebel Abdullah Ocalan from Syria to the Greek embassy in Kenya. His capture and return to stand trial for terror he organized from exile the past 15 years is a great feat of counter-terrorism.It will help the center-left prime minister, Bulent Ecevit, politically in Turkey. It raises the confidence of the armed forces, who host the U.S. air base at Incirlik, which has generated a veiled threat against Turkey by Iraq.
NEWS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,Contributing Writer | October 22, 1993
DUNAJSKA STREDA, Slovakia -- Karoly Hodossy's family name dates back a half-millennium, but it's new to him, and he wants to keep it.Two years ago, Mr. Hodossy -- an ethnic Hungarian living in Slovakia -- changed his name from Hodosi, the Slovak spelling. Now he's afraid he may be forced to change it back again."The name Hodossy is 500 years old, but in 1919 the Slovaks made my great-grandfather change the spelling," said Mr. Hodossy, who works in the local City Hall. "In Slovakia, the Slovaks are the boss, and we Hungarians have to do what they say."
NEWS
May 23, 1993
The Clinton administration may be on the verge of undermining federal enforcement of civil rights after 12 years of Reagan-Bush neglect and regression. Instead of restoring the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division to its proper role as vigorous guardian of minority rights, it is about to embroil that beleaguered office in a troubling quarrel. President Clinton has nominated a brilliant but provocative law professor, Lani Guinier, to become assistant attorney general in charge of civil rights.
NEWS
By Diane Winston | May 13, 1991
At a campus where fun was once a four-letter word, students at the Johns Hopkins University are starting to mention the term without blushing.Almost. On a sunny spring day, a gaggle of undergraduates lolling on the lawn seemed to be enjoying the weather. But each one had a thick textbook within arm's reach -- just in case the urge hit them to study quadratic formulas or chemical equations.The Baltimore school, touted as one of the nation's elite institutions, has long been twitted as a pre-med factory and a research-oriented ivory tower.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | May 5, 2009
SALISBURY -It's not easy to be the answer to a trivia question. But Ryan Minor, the man who replaced Cal Ripken Jr. on Sept. 20, 1998, and ended his consecutive-games streak at 2,632, is at peace with his place in baseball history, even if it comes up while he's eating dinner on the road. "You hear that question asked a ton," Minor says as he sits in the dugout of his employer, the Single-A Delmarva Shorebirds. "And people don't even realize you're sitting there and you're the guy that played that night.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | February 26, 1993
London. -- It was Mahatma Gandhi who used to say that one could assess civilization by the manner in which it dealt with minorities. Ralf Dahrendorf, the eminence grise of European education, more recently made a similar point in an address before that remarkable London campaigning power-house, the Minority Rights Group (which shows what can be done by two people, a phone, a fax and a secretary).''Defense of minority rights is the litmus test of liberty and the rule of law,'' Professor Dahrendorf said, and went on wryly to note: ''Ruling interests and beliefs need no protection; power protects, though it may corrupt as well.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | February 19, 1993
London.--It was President Woodrow Wilson who, at the end of the First World War, threw that great secessionist fragmentation bomb, the principle of the self-determination of nations, into the arena of public debate. ''Every people should be left free to determine its own polity,'' he told the American Congress.Nearly eight decades later we have a new American secretary of state, Warren Christopher, worrying, ''If we don't find some way that different ethnic groups can live together in a country, how many countries will we have?
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