Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMinority Participation
IN THE NEWS

Minority Participation

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1996
Baltimore County school board member Robert F. Dashiell last night asked the school board's attorney to examine a contractor's claims that it used minority-owned businesses in an air control project worth more than $1 million at three schools.Johnson Controls was awarded a contract last March to install an energy-saving air system under the agreement that the company would use minority subcontractors on the project, school district officials said.Pressed to prove its commitment a year later -- when the project came up for a $98,663 addition -- the company told school officials it had 8 percent minority participation from a subcontractor called Electrical Automation Services Inc. (EASI)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
The state Board of Public Works delayed action Wednesday on a $205 million contract under which a Canadian-based company would replace CSX Transportation as the operator of the MARC Camden and Brunswick rail commuter lines. The item was withdrawn from the agenda by the Maryland Department of Transportation, which oversaw the bidding that resulted in a plan to award the contract to Bombardier Transportation Services. The company is the U.S. affiliate of Bombardier Inc. of Montreal.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2000
In an effort to appease minority business owners, city officials this week worked on revamping a proposal to increase minority participation in city contracts by providing for the Board of Estimates to set contracting goals annually. City Solicitor Thurman W. Zollicoffer Jr. unveiled the amendments during two City Council hearings on the issue, as officials grapple with a federal judge's ruling in December that invalidated the city's minority set-aside law. Mayor Martin O'Malley introduced a bill in June to increase minority participation goals while trying to avoid further court scrutiny.
NEWS
By Pless Jones Sr | June 7, 2012
Recently, a group of elected officials who represent Baltimore's east side held a press conference calling for more inclusion of minority-owned firms and more jobs for their constituents through the $300 million in ongoing construction projects generated byEast Baltimore Development Inc.(EBDI). Surprisingly, they proposed to achieve their objective of increasing construction employment and inclusion by acting to "shut down" several construction projects. As president of the Maryland Minority Contractors Association and the owner of P&J Contracting in Baltimore, I share their desire to increase economic inclusion.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2004
When Vickie Stewart began saving souls on the streets of Brazil, skin color was among her greatest assets. Combining a mocha complexion with fluent Portuguese, she passed herself off as a local long enough to draw people in. "I would come up and say: `Would you like to come to Bible study?'" said Stewart, a black Baltimorean who returns to Brazil on Wednesday for a three-year tour as a Southern Baptist missionary. "They automatically thought I was Brazilian. It was really easy to connect."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
The state Board of Public Works delayed action Wednesday on a $205 million contract under which a Canadian-based company would replace CSX Transportation as the operator of the MARC Camden and Brunswick rail commuter lines. The item was withdrawn from the agenda by the Maryland Department of Transportation, which oversaw the bidding that resulted in a plan to award the contract to Bombardier Transportation Services. The company is the U.S. affiliate of Bombardier Inc. of Montreal.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2002
Maryland officials are considering reducing the performance bond and minority participation requirements for contractors on the Woodrow Wilson Bridge replacement project in order to attract more bidders for the job. Those items are among issues listed in a report released yesterday that explains why the state received only one bid for the project. The $860 million bid by a consortium of three major construction firms was about 75 percent higher than the state's estimate for replacing the structure.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1996
A Baltimore County school board member said yesterday he will ask for sanctions against a company under question for its claims of using certified minority-owned subcontractors for a $1.2 million school air system control project.Raising broad questions about the district's minority contracting program, Robert F. Dashiell also said that the Johnson Controls Inc. project continued for a year without the district checking the credentials of its subcontractor, which is not certified as a woman-owned business.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2001
The awarding of an emergency contract to repair the intersection of Howard and Lombard streets sparked an unusually heated confrontation yesterday before the city's Board of Estimates, as minority contractors accused the winning bidder of not doing more to include minority businesses in the $1.35 million contract. Jessup-based Cherry Hill Construction won the contract on a 3-2 vote, with City Council President Sheila Dixon and Comptroller Joan M. Pratt voting no, saying the company should have tried harder to include minority businesses.
NEWS
By J. Mitchell Kearney | February 26, 2001
THE ISSUE of "set-aside" goals for Minority Business Enterprises (MBE) has received a great deal of attention from state and city leaders in recent weeks. In January, Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced his intention to seek legislation raising the state's goal for minority contracting from the current 14 percent to 25 percent. In his recent State of the City address, Mayor Martin O'Malley reaffirmed the goal of his administration to award 35 percent of the city's business to MBEs. Proponents of minority set-aside goals argue that such measures are necessary to level the playing field.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2010
For the first time, Maryland is on track to meet its annual goal of awarding one-quarter of state contract dollars to minority- or female-owned businesses, Gov. Martin O'Malley said Friday. O'Malley, who made the announcement at a state-sponsored minority business event in Towson, said the news was particularly meaningful because of the state's budget woes. "We look at our diversity as a strength," the Democratic governor told the gathering of about 200 business leaders. "We look at it as a competitive advantage."
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | July 17, 2008
The Board of Public Works delayed action yesterday on a contract with a bus company that failed to meet Maryland's minority business goals, though two of its three members said they believe the state has taken sufficient steps to ensure the company's future compliance. The contract with First Transit Inc. had raised the hackles of minority contractors because the company failed to meet the original goal that minority subcontractors perform 30 percent of the work. Last year, the company got a waiver from the Maryland Aviation Administration to reduce that goal to 13 percent on its contract to run shuttle buses that transport passengers to and from parking lots at the Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Bradley Olson and Gadi Dechter and Bradley Olson,Sun reporters | May 1, 2008
The state Board of Public Works yesterday wrestled with two claims by aggrieved minority-owned businesses, postponing a $45 million airport shuttle-bus contract and approving a $9 million hospital construction project over the objections of advocates. Arnold M. Jolivet, president of the Maryland Minority Contractors Association, failed to persuade the board to reject a state-funded contract with Baltimore-based Whiting Turner Contracting Co. to build new operating rooms for the University of Maryland Medical System.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | March 22, 2007
Members of the Board of Public Works, including Gov. Martin O'Malley, grilled University System of Maryland officials yesterday, asking why more minority- and women-owned firms were not receiving larger portions of state contracts. Comptroller Peter Franchot, one of three board members, asked university representatives why two state contracts were offered to companies agreeing to award only 10 percent of their work to minority firms, when the state's goal is 25 percent. The projects included a $40 million contract for university-wide computer software and a nearly $37 million contract for a Baltimore firm to build new campus housing at Towson University.
NEWS
By JILL ROSEN AND DOUG DONOVAN and JILL ROSEN AND DOUG DONOVAN,SUN REPORTERS | January 14, 2006
Though some applaud an unconventional deal that would allow a major developer and an inner-city church to share profits from a waterfront development, others say the city-backed strategy not only smacks of politics, but makes a mockery of minority-participation efforts. Baltimore development officials announced this week that a partnership of David S. Cordish and Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church won rights to redevelop downtown's Pier Six Concert Pavilion. The church would reap 10 percent of the venue's yearly profits but would put no equity into the deal.
NEWS
By DOUG DONOVAN and DOUG DONOVAN,SUN REPORTER | January 13, 2006
Call it a public-private-pulpit partnership. To resurrect the moribund Pier Six Concert Pavilion, Baltimore officials yesterday selected a uniquely configured management team that pairs a premier Inner Harbor developer with a prominent inner-city church. The partnership of developer David S. Cordish and Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church pastor Frank M. Reid III appears to establish a pioneering chapter for minority participation in city-backed projects - the African-American church risks no money, yet it shares in the profits.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2003
A federal lawsuit challenging how Baltimore awards contracts to minority-owned companies was settled this week under terms that handed a victory to Mayor Martin O'Malley, who has said that including such firms in city projects is "of the highest priority for this administration." The survival of the city's policy against the latest legal attack bodes well for similar programs throughout the nation aimed at rectifying past discrimination in public contracts, officials said. In 1999, many other U.S. cities suffered the same fate as Baltimore when their minority participation policies were struck down as unconstitutional.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | July 17, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- A firm that includes William L. "Little Willie" Adams, a political ally of Gov. William Donald Schaefer, has been disqualified as a minority subcontractor in the state's new lottery computer contract by state officials who say the firm had neither the equipment nor the experience to do $1.2 million a year in lottery printing.WBS Inc., of which Mr. Adams is treasurer, was one of the minority-owned firms that GTECH Corp., of Rhode Island, included in its bid to win the state's $64 million contract for lottery master computers and sales terminals.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | October 27, 2005
Mayor Martin O'Malley attacked yesterday a state initiative to direct government contracts to minority-owned businesses as "falling way short" and angrily dismissed a state-funded sewer project as not adequately engaging companies owned by blacks. After a heated debate with his staff, O'Malley and the Board of Estimates deferred a $33 million sewer upgrade contract because only about 9 percent would have been awarded to minority-owned subcontractors, far below the city's targets. Governments set minority- and women-owned business goals on major contracts to direct a portion of tax money to companies that have experienced past discrimination on public works projects.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2005
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. scrambled to calm growing anger yesterday over his comments earlier this week about one day ending Maryland's program to increase minority participation in state contracts. In one closed-door meeting after another, Ehrlich tried to assure lawmakers - many of whom plan to voice their concerns at a noon news conference today - that he is committed to the state's Minority Business Enterprise program and has worked to expand it. "The comments arose out of [Comptroller William Donald Schaefer's]
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.