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Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Lt. Gov.  Anthony G. Brown released an eight-point plan Wednesday that he said will increase the number of minority-owned businesses that win state contracts. Maryland already has one of the highest goals in the nation to award state business to companies owned and operated by women and minorities, firms that have traditionally struggled to land such contracts. Brown's plan, which is part of his bid for governor, suggests making it easier for businesses to get the certification required to compete for those contracts, as well as create new programs that encourage private companies to hire firms minority owned contracts.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Arnold M. Jolivet, a longtime advocate for minority- and women-owned businesses who was a familiar presence at City Hall, died of complications from heart disease Sunday morning at Sinai Hospital. The Village of Cross Keys resident was 71. "Mr. Jolivet was a consistent, devoted and vocal champion for minority businesses," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement. "His unapologetic approach to overcoming obstacles will always be his legacy. He understood, as I do, that progress cannot be achieved without economic parity for minority-owned businesses.
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2010
For the first time, Maryland is on track to meet its annual goal of awarding one-quarter of state contract dollars to minority- or female-owned businesses, Gov. Martin O'Malley said Friday. O'Malley, who made the announcement at a state-sponsored minority business event in Towson, said the news was particularly meaningful because of the state's budget woes. "We look at our diversity as a strength," the Democratic governor told the gathering of about 200 business leaders. "We look at it as a competitive advantage."
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
Baltimore-based Whiting-Turner Contracting Co. has been chosen as general contractor to build Maryland's sixth casino at National Harbor, a nearly $1 billion project on the Potomac River expected to get under way in weeks and be completed in about two years. The casino owner, MGM National Harbor LLC, announced Tuesday that it had chosen Whiting-Turner, which is finishing up work on the state's fifth casino, Horseshoe Casino Baltimore. That $442 million project is expected to open in late August near M&T Bank Stadium, another Whiting-Turner project.
NEWS
February 10, 2007
Mayor Sheila Dixon yesterday announced she has appointed Carla A. Nelson to become director of the Mayor's Office of Women and Minority Business Development. Nelson is president and chief executive officer of Visionary Network Consultants Inc., according to a news release from Dixon's office. The company "has done business consulting, marketing, public relations and training services for public and private sector clients throughout the Maryland metropolitan region." "I was looking for someone who will champion the wealth of talent and skills women and minority-owned businesses bring to Baltimore City," Dixon said in a statement.
NEWS
By Paul Shread | September 14, 1990
The amount of business the city of Annapolis does with women has tripled in the last three years, but money going to black-or Hispanic-owned businesses has declined.A total of $1,113,670 -- or 14.2 percent -- of city business went to firms owned by women or minorities in fiscal year 1990, which ended June 30, said purchasing agent Brian Snyder. Only $76,000 of that money went to black-or Hispanic-owned businesses.And although black-or Hispanic-owned businesses are receiving less city money, businesses owned by women continue to do well, receiving $1,011,066, or 12.9 percent of city business.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | April 9, 2006
Nearly two years ago, Laura Allen drove her '95 Ford pickup from San Diego to Anne Arundel County, toting a small trailer and a big dream - opening in a restaurant near her son, a midshipman at the Naval Academy. Today, Allen operates a thriving Mexican restaurant in Severna Park. The secret to her success is not just her recipe for fish tacos and carne asada, it's the county, Allen said. "I don't know of any other place where I could have done it," said Allen, who opened Diego's Mexican Restaurant in November.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 6, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration will announce a new approach in the awarding of government contracts that may end race-based preferences for some minority-owned businesses while making billions of dollars in federal contracts available for others, officials said yesterday.The new effort reflects a commitment within the administration to preserve some affirmative action programs while complying with court rulings that severely limit them.The revised approach, in proposed Justice Department regulations to be issued this week, will substantially change the rules for awarding federal contracts worth $200 billion a year.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO and HANAH CHO,SUN REPORTER | May 10, 2006
Maryland awarded 21 percent of all state contracts to minority-owned businesses in fiscal 2005, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. said yesterday. He said the figures show the state is moving closer to its goal of providing more government work to companies owned by women, people of color and those with disabilities. Flanked by Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele, state officials and dozens of small business owners, Ehrlich told a Baltimore news conference that minority- and women-owned firms received about $954 million of $4.5 billion in state contracts for the fiscal year that ended June 30. Participation among women- and minority-owned businesses in state contracts rose by nearly 50 percent from fiscal year 2004, when the firms were awarded $641 million in state contracts, or 17.4 percent, he said.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff writer | April 5, 1992
Howard County officials have lost focus of the county's Minority Business Enterprise Program, which was created to provide economic opportunities to minorities, says a report released last week.In 1979,the county established its MBE procurement program, aimed at giving a share -- at least 10 percent -- of the county's goods and services to minority-owned businesses through contracts and direct awards.In 1990, the county gave 18.4 percent of the work to minority-owned companies as it issued $14.2 million in capital project contracts.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
Minority-owned businesses can receive help expanding, securing contracts and accessing large supply chains through a new center that opened Friday, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced. The Minority Business Development Agency at Johns Hopkins University will provide consulting services for established entrepreneurs and the owners of start-ups as a way to create and keep jobs in Baltimore. The center, known as MBDA Business Center-Baltimore, also is intended to help the companies tap into international markets.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Lt. Gov.  Anthony G. Brown released an eight-point plan Wednesday that he said will increase the number of minority-owned businesses that win state contracts. Maryland already has one of the highest goals in the nation to award state business to companies owned and operated by women and minorities, firms that have traditionally struggled to land such contracts. Brown's plan, which is part of his bid for governor, suggests making it easier for businesses to get the certification required to compete for those contracts, as well as create new programs that encourage private companies to hire firms minority owned contracts.
BUSINESS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Baltimore City officials are investigating a complaint filed Wednesday by two minority- and women-owned businesses against health care giant Aetna for not using their services despite a contractual agreement to do so. Thomas B. Corey, chief of Baltimore's Minority & Women's Business Opportunity Office, said he will research why Aetna did not use the subcontractors, CASI Inc. and JUL Enterprise, despite committing to when it applied for the city...
EXPLORE
April 30, 2012
Harford County-based human resources firm HR Solutions LLC has been named one of the 2012 Top 100 Minority Business Enterprise Award winners for the region that includes Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Washington, D.C. Firm founder and president Renée McNally attributes the selection of HR Solutions to the top 100 list to a variety of factors, including business growth and community involvement. Founded in 2004, HR Solutions experienced significant revenue growth over the past two years, growing more than 45 percent annually from 2009 to 2011.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2010
Prodded by a state delegate, Columbia Association officials are planning to create a program to guarantee that minority-owned businesses get a minimum percentage of contracts, something advocates say is long overdue for the giant homeowners' association. At the same time, Del. Frank S. Turner has joined a community watchdog group's effort to get CA to routinely disclose pay and bonus information for each association employee. Turner complained that CA should not be asking cash-strapped county and state governments for money to help dredge the town's lakes and rebuild Symphony Woods Park while paying employees annual cash bonuses.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2010
For the first time, Maryland is on track to meet its annual goal of awarding one-quarter of state contract dollars to minority- or female-owned businesses, Gov. Martin O'Malley said Friday. O'Malley, who made the announcement at a state-sponsored minority business event in Towson, said the news was particularly meaningful because of the state's budget woes. "We look at our diversity as a strength," the Democratic governor told the gathering of about 200 business leaders. "We look at it as a competitive advantage."
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
Baltimore-based Whiting-Turner Contracting Co. has been chosen as general contractor to build Maryland's sixth casino at National Harbor, a nearly $1 billion project on the Potomac River expected to get under way in weeks and be completed in about two years. The casino owner, MGM National Harbor LLC, announced Tuesday that it had chosen Whiting-Turner, which is finishing up work on the state's fifth casino, Horseshoe Casino Baltimore. That $442 million project is expected to open in late August near M&T Bank Stadium, another Whiting-Turner project.
NEWS
By Richard J. Cross III | July 8, 2009
Maryland Republicans are at a crossroads. They face a Democratic governor and legislature and a lopsided electoral map. Friction between libertarians and social conservatives continues to cause intraparty strife. The good news: Maryland Republicans have the freedom that comes with low expectations. They may experiment without fear, lead by example and serve as a model for the nation. Here are seven strategies that may help the beleaguered state GOP jump-start its fortunes. 1. Bring disparate elements together.
BUSINESS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | March 24, 2009
A couple who opened a fast-food restaurant at BWI through a program to boost minority business ownership were forced to close because a management company's pricing and operating guidelines made it impossible to be profitable, the couple's lawyer told a jury in his opening statement Monday in a civil trial. Marcus and Denise Beasley are suing BAA Maryland, the company that manages the retail space at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, and Church's Chicken, for which they operated a franchise.
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