Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMinority Leader
IN THE NEWS

Minority Leader

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | December 7, 1994
Republican delegates, giddy with the excitement of electoral victory, picked Robert H. Kittleman of Howard County as their new leader yesterday, a move they hope will keep pressure on the General Assembly's ruling Democrats.Mr. Kittleman won a closer than expected 21-20 victory over Delegate George C. Edwards of Garrett County in the race for House minority leader. Mr. Kittleman had vowed to continue the more confrontational style of outgoing Minority Leader Ellen R. Sauerbrey, while Mr. Edwards was considered more likely to try to forge alliances with conservative Democrats.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 11, 2014
On the 40th anniversary of Richard Nixon's resignation as president, his admission of guilt has finally been made public in a 1983 videotaped interview with him by an old White House aide. Speaking of the "smoking gun" White House tape in which he talked about raising hush money for the arrested Watergate burglars, Nixon tells aide Frank Gannon: "This was the final blow, the nail in the coffin. Although you didn't need another nail if you were already in the coffin, which we were.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 21, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Citing concerns that "his heart is not as big as his head," Minority Leader Harry Reid, the Senate's top Democrat, announced yesterday that he would vote against John G. Roberts Jr., President Bush's choice to serve as the next chief justice of the United States. Reid was the first Democrat to formally state his position on Roberts' nomination. Reid, of Nevada, insisted that his decision should not be seen as a party position and other Democrats should vote as they see fit. However, because Reid is a centrist Democrat who opposes abortion, his opposition was seen as a signal that many, and perhaps most, Democrats were likely to come out against the 50-year-old appeals court judge.
NEWS
March 10, 2014
The announcement last week by Maryland's Board of Revenue Estimates that the state will be taking in $238 million less in taxes this year and next was certainly unwelcome, and it complicates the already difficult task the General Assembly faces in enacting a balanced budget before it adjourns in April. The amount of tooth-gnashing it has prompted, however, is wildly out of proportion to its actual impact on the state's overall spending plans. Comptroller Peter Franchot, who as chairman of the Board of Revenue Estimates was on hand to approve the new figures on Thursday, told The Washington post that the numbers are "proof positive that something is wrong.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Larry Carson and Michael Dresser and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2001
State Senate Minority Leader Martin G. Madden, a moderate Howard County Republican who helped craft Maryland's welfare reform program, said yesterday that he will end his 11-year career in elected office for personal and business reasons. Madden, 52, who has led the Senate's Republicans for three years, said he plans to leave his General Assembly seat at the end of the year. His district covers most of eastern Howard County and the Laurel area of Prince George's County. Madden is a self-employed insurance agent.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2011
Maryland Senate Republicans chose Sen. Nancy Jacobs as minority leader on Friday — just weeks after voting her out of the minority whip position. The GOP caucus elected Sen. E.J. Pipkin as the new minority whip. The leadership elections followed the resignation of Minority Leader Allan H. Kittleman over his plans to introduce legislation to legalize same-sex civil unions in Maryland. Jacobs, who represents Harford and Cecil counties, said the Senate Republicans' main goal this year will be to "protect constituents who are hurting financially in these tough economic times.
NEWS
By Nick Anderson and Nick Anderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 2003
WASHINGTON - In the jostling among Democratic presidential contenders for endorsements from elected officials, Rep. Richard A. Gephardt of Missouri laid claim yesterday to being king of the hill - Capitol Hill, that is. Gephardt, a 14-term congressman, scooped up the formal backing of his successor as House minority leader, Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California, and her chief deputy, House Minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer of Maryland. Gephardt also named 28 other House Democrats who back his candidacy.
NEWS
May 21, 1997
TWO YEARS and nine months before the next presidential primary, House minority leader Richard Gephardt has effectively broken with the Clinton administration and served notice he will challenge Vice President Al Gore for the Democratic nomination. By coming out against the balanced budget agreement forged by Mr. Clinton and the Republican leadership on Capitol Hill, the Missouri congressman has deliberately called attention to the ideological fault line between liberals and moderates in his party.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 9, 2010
Some House Democrats have professed to be surprised that their leader, Speaker Nancy Pelosi, has decided to ask them to retain her as their chieftain, this time as minority leader, in the next congressional session based on the Republican takeover. The argument apparently is that after the huge loss of seats in this fall's midterm elections, she should have voluntarily taken the blame and slinked off into political oblivion. Some even suggested she might well retire from Congress altogether.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2010
Nancy Pelosi's days as speaker of the House were dwindling in number, but her to-do list was growing: The tax deal President Barack Obama negotiated with Republicans but she was charged with passing? Check. Threats of rebellion within her own Democratic ranks? Quelled. Immigration? Gays in the military? Plenty of time — never mind that clock ticking toward Christmas break and the Jan. 5 start date for the new House that she no longer will lead. But on one afternoon last week, despite the urgent negotiations and the late-night votes, Pelosi seemed as serene as her surroundings: a pale yellow sitting room that is part of the prime Capitol real estate she commands, for now, with power views of the Washington Monument and a collection of photographs that speak to a long and highly personal view of politics, measured not just by election cycles but generational ones.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, a Baltimore native, will next month receive a "lifetime achievement award for her longtime dedication to LGBT rights and her work to fight HIV/AIDS in Congress," gay leaders in Baltimore said Friday. The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore is giving Pelosi the award at its inaugural "Hometown Hero Awards & Champagne Brunch" on Nov. 17 in Baltimore, an event it expects some 500 people to attend. Matt Thorn, executive director of the GLCCB, said in a statement that Pelosi's “unending support for our community and commitment for equality make her the perfect choice for our lifetime achievement award.
NEWS
September 12, 2013
Party: Republican Age: 54 Born: Olney on Oct. 20, 1958 Current location: West Friendship Schools: Atholton Elementary School, Ellicott City and Hammond Middle Schools and Atholton High School Degrees: B.A. political science, University of Maryland Baltimore County (1981); J.D. with honors, University of Maryland School of Law (1988) Family: Wife, Robin, and four children Family note: Late father, Bob Kittleman, was District 14B delegate (1983-2002)
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
Senate Minority Leader E.J. Pipkin announced Monday he would retire from the legislature next week and move to Texas to pursue a graduate degree in sports management. Pipkin, 56, served as Republican's chief debater in the Maryland Senate, leading opposition in recent years to the state's new gun-control law, legalization of same-sex marriage, repeal of the death penalty and off-shore wind program. The former investment banker was first elected to the legislature in 2002, knocking of a Democrat and incumbent chairman of the Judicial Proceedings Committee, Pipkin's chief of staff John Fiastro said.
NEWS
By David Horsey | April 2, 2013
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell will not be facing a challenge from actress Ashley Judd when he runs for re-election next year. Though he may be happy to have avoided the physical comparison -- she, after all, played Marilyn Monroe in a movie, while he looks like an ancient sea turtle dressed in a $1,000 suit -- the Kentucky Republican may miss having such an attractive target for his attack machine. Mr. McConnell is not all that popular back home. Democrats, of course, can't stand him, and tea party Republicans may like him even less.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | November 27, 2012
Editor: My good friend Stuart Tamres appears to have misunderstood the recent letter from Wendy Sawyer that appeared in The Aegis . Rather than calling on everyone to blindly jump on the Democratic bandwagon, she merely stated the obvious: President Obama won the election (and 52 percent is a majority whether Stuart believes it or not) and he gets to set the agenda. If the Republicans want to have a say, they need to join the discussions and show they are serious about solving this country's fiscal problems.
NEWS
By Mitch McConnell | June 14, 2011
Over the next several weeks, Republicans in Washington will be engaged in a critical mission: to persuade Democrats of the need to develop a plan that reins in our debt without raising taxes, which we know would kill jobs. This effort is taking place in the context of President Barack Obama's request to raise the nation's debt limit, and early indications suggest that many Democrats still need some convincing. The key to success, in my view, is for everyone involved to view the debt limit vote as an opportunity — an opportunity to reduce Washington spending now and to save taxpayers trillions of dollars over the long term.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 11, 2014
On the 40th anniversary of Richard Nixon's resignation as president, his admission of guilt has finally been made public in a 1983 videotaped interview with him by an old White House aide. Speaking of the "smoking gun" White House tape in which he talked about raising hush money for the arrested Watergate burglars, Nixon tells aide Frank Gannon: "This was the final blow, the nail in the coffin. Although you didn't need another nail if you were already in the coffin, which we were.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2011
Maryland Senate Republicans chose Sen. Nancy Jacobs as minority leader on Friday — just weeks after voting her out of the minority whip position. The GOP caucus elected Sen. E.J. Pipkin as the new minority whip. The leadership elections followed the resignation of Minority Leader Allan H. Kittleman over his plans to introduce legislation to legalize same-sex civil unions in Maryland. Jacobs, who represents Harford and Cecil counties, said the Senate Republicans' main goal this year will be to "protect constituents who are hurting financially in these tough economic times.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2011
State Sen. Allan H. Kittleman shocked Maryland Republicans by announcing Tuesday that he will step down as Senate minority leader, a decision he said he made after fellow caucus members voiced discomfort with legislation he is pushing to recognize same-sex civil unions. "I'm a social moderate, and I wanted to stand up for what I believe in," the Howard County Republican said in a brief interview Tuesday morning on his way to the Senate chamber. He has held the position for two years.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.