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NEWS
June 27, 2014
Letter writer Jack Wickham thinks that few members of the First Nations find team names like Redskins (and their logos) offensive because, he says, he does not hear them complain ( "Patent office goes too far with Redskins decision," June 24). I would only ask, how many Native Americans does Mr. Wickham count among his personal acquaintances? I know of no Native Americans among my acquaintances who find such names tolerable. Writers like Sherman Alexie, moreover, have articulated what might be termed the "Native American point of view" on this subject - even if such texts have not come to Mr. Wickham's attention.
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NEWS
June 27, 2014
Letter writer Jack Wickham thinks that few members of the First Nations find team names like Redskins (and their logos) offensive because, he says, he does not hear them complain ( "Patent office goes too far with Redskins decision," June 24). I would only ask, how many Native Americans does Mr. Wickham count among his personal acquaintances? I know of no Native Americans among my acquaintances who find such names tolerable. Writers like Sherman Alexie, moreover, have articulated what might be termed the "Native American point of view" on this subject - even if such texts have not come to Mr. Wickham's attention.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
A frequent critic of Baltimore's contract bidding process filed a lawsuit Wednesday contending that Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and other members of the Board of Estimates have acted "discriminatorily and outright corruptly" by awarding contracts to large firms without considering minority contractors. The 185-page civil lawsuit brought by Arnold Jolivet, managing director of the Maryland Minority Contractors Association Inc., seeks damages for what it calls "flagrantly unlawful, willful and unconscionable conduct" by city officials.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 15, 2012
Trading pollution "credits" to reduce the cost of cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay risks endangering the health of the region's poor and minority communities, a new report warns. The report by the Washingon-based Center for Progressive Reform contends that without explicit safeguards, water-quality trading programs being launched in Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia could result in localized concentrations of nutrient pollution, most likely in urban areas with already degraded waters.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 15, 2012
Trading pollution "credits" to reduce the cost of cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay risks endangering the health of the region's poor and minority communities, a new report warns. The report by the Washingon-based Center for Progressive Reform contends that without explicit safeguards, water-quality trading programs being launched in Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia could result in localized concentrations of nutrient pollution, most likely in urban areas with already degraded waters.
NEWS
By Joseph Coates and Joseph Coates,Chicago Tribune | August 1, 1993
NO PITY: HOW THE DISABILITY RIGHTS MOVEMENT IS CHANGING AMERICAJoseph P. ShapiroTimes Books388 pages, $25 Asmartly groomed young woman sits in an airport lounge awaiting her flight, sipping occasionally from a plastic cup of coffee. Another woman walks quickly by and plunks a quarter into the cup, splashing coffee on the blouse of the seated woman. Seeing her mistake, and for the first time noticing the briefcase leaning against the battery-powered wheelchair of the seated woman, the "benefactor" hurries out of the presence of Marylou Breslin, executive director of the Disability Rights, Education and Defense Fund.
NEWS
By Robbie Whelan and Julie Scharper | March 26, 2010
Former Mayor Sheila Dixon has a new job, with a group that has long been a strong supporter of her, and vice versa. Dixon said has been helping the Maryland Minority Contractors Association with marketing and is in the process of hashing out a permanent role with the organization. "All of this is preliminary," said Dixon, who left office Feb. 4 as part of a plea deal to settle criminal charges of embezzlement and perjury. "We're still in discussions." Dixon said she has been working part time to help the association plan a minority business showcase at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture next week.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 28, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Census Bureau unveiled its first-ever paid advertising campaign yesterday as part of a $167 million effort to reach minority groups that have been missed in past national head counts.The campaign is aimed at reversing a 30-year trend toward fewer Americans completing and returning the census forms that are mailed out once a decade. The ads will target groups that have historically been undercounted: blacks, Latinos, American Indians and new immigrants from all countries.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2001
A proposed 26 percent budget cut to Baltimore's anti-discrimination agency, the Community Relations Commission, has triggered concerns among some city officials and minority groups, particularly the city's gay and lesbian community. The commission, once hailed as a model for city government efforts to combat discrimination, is down to 17 staffers from a 1970s high of 60. Commission officials, braced for steep budget cuts, were surprised when Mayor Martin O'Malley two weeks ago proposed cutting a quarter of their funding -- from $949,485 -- which includes $50,000 in federal funds -- to $704,618 in his preliminary budget plan.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,STAFF WRITER | November 18, 1990
The black director of a regional community assistance program has come to the defense of the Turf Valley Country Club, which he says has been the unfair target of a racial controversy being kept alive by the Howard County branch of the NAACP.The Rev. Roland Howard, director of the Regional Action Planning Program, said he is encouraging the NAACP to meet with Turf Valley owner Nicholas B. Mangione to settle their differences. The two sides have been at odds since a Turf Valley manager left racist remarks on the telephone answering machine of a local NAACP member in 1988.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
A frequent critic of Baltimore's contract bidding process filed a lawsuit Wednesday contending that Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and other members of the Board of Estimates have acted "discriminatorily and outright corruptly" by awarding contracts to large firms without considering minority contractors. The 185-page civil lawsuit brought by Arnold Jolivet, managing director of the Maryland Minority Contractors Association Inc., seeks damages for what it calls "flagrantly unlawful, willful and unconscionable conduct" by city officials.
NEWS
By Robbie Whelan and Julie Scharper | March 26, 2010
Former Mayor Sheila Dixon has a new job, with a group that has long been a strong supporter of her, and vice versa. Dixon said has been helping the Maryland Minority Contractors Association with marketing and is in the process of hashing out a permanent role with the organization. "All of this is preliminary," said Dixon, who left office Feb. 4 as part of a plea deal to settle criminal charges of embezzlement and perjury. "We're still in discussions." Dixon said she has been working part time to help the association plan a minority business showcase at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture next week.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | July 6, 2008
For Pfc. Holly Burnham, helping the senior citizens of Howard County feel safe is a mission. And for Cpl. Alan Shaffer, finding a way for minority communities to develop a relationship with the Police Department has become his reason for going to work every day. Burnham and Shaffer are liaison officers for the Howard County Police Department, which established the positions in November to meet the growing needs of two key segments of the public: seniors...
BUSINESS
By Marilyn Geewax and Marilyn Geewax,Cox News Service | September 12, 2006
BOSTON -- When terrorists slammed planes into the World Trade Center in New York five years ago, the National Association for Business Economics was there, holding its annual convention. Yesterday, when the same group met here, its members marveled at the resilience that the U.S. economy has demonstrated since that blue-sky morning when they ran outside into a hard rain of debris from the flaming tower above. U.S. consumers "got over it more quickly than I thought" at the time they would, said David Wyss, chief economist for Standard & Poor's in New York.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 24, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Top Sunni Muslim Arab leaders lashed out yesterday against a draft constitution presented to the Iraqi parliament the day before, threatening to mobilize voters against it in an October referendum that could split the nation even further along sectarian lines. Shiite Muslim politicians from the majority group that controls Iraq's government said they wanted to work out a deal with the Sunnis but that they plan to push the constitution through parliament later this week and then present it to the Iraqi public for a vote with or without Sunni agreement.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2005
Maryland Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele yesterday called on the all-white Elkridge Club to change its membership practices so that African-Americans can be admitted, and said he understands the anger of minority groups at Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s decision to hold a fund-raising event there. "There is a sensitivity with respect to this issue, particularly in the African-American community, that cannot be lost," Steele said, offering on WBAL radio his most extensive comments to date on the volatile issue of the club's membership since Ehrlich's June 20 golfing fund-raiser.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | January 10, 1999
Anne Arundel County School Superintendent Carol S. Parham is searching for answers to a puzzle that has frustrated educators across the country for decades: Why do minorities receive lower grades, test more poorly and get suspended more than white classmates?Parham, an African-American who heads a mostly white school district, recently called in black teachers, community leaders and administrators to ask for help in finding ways to close the gap between minority and white students."I'm not looking for a whole new set of things," she said.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | July 12, 1991
Fifteen years ago, when activists for the handicapped began demanding better services, Anne Arundel County set up a special program for the disabled. But people in wheelchairs couldn't even get into the office.The county initially opened its Office of Disability Serviceson the second floor of an Annapolis building with no handicapped access.Although the program has since moved into a first-floor office onWest Street, the snafu underscores the basic access problems often faced by the handicapped.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2005
Robert Lee Clay, a prominent contractor whose political and business dealings were dogged by controversy and who twice prevailed over charges he was involved in shootings, was found dead yesterday morning in his Reservoir Hill office. Baltimore police said Mr. Clay had been shot but would not specify whether the death was a homicide or suicide. Mr. Clay's daughter, Sharon Clay, who found him on the floor of his office on Brookfield Avenue, said he had mentioned to her that he had "several death threats made against him" in recent weeks.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2004
Minority contractors are protesting the state's choice of a firm to study Maryland's use of minority- and women-owned businesses, saying it bypassed a well-qualified and cheaper company that is owned by a black woman. The contractors further criticized the state's choice of National Economic Research Associates Inc. of White Plains, N.Y., saying that company played a key role in designing Chicago's minority business enterprise program, which was struck down last year by a federal judge who said it was not properly tailored to remedy past discrimination.
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