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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 1, 1996
TOKYO -- Despite a resounding victory for his party in national elections, Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto is having difficulty forming a new governing coalition, raising the likelihood that Japan's next government will be fragile and indecisive.Political experts say it now looks likely that Hashimoto's Liberal Democratic Party will not be able to put together a coalition that ++ will give it a comfortable majority in the lower house of Parliament.Instead, the Liberal Democrats might run a minority government, controlling the Cabinet but being forced to cooperate with other parties on a case-by-case basis to enact legislation.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 1, 1996
TOKYO -- Despite a resounding victory for his party in national elections, Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto is having difficulty forming a new governing coalition, raising the likelihood that Japan's next government will be fragile and indecisive.Political experts say it now looks likely that Hashimoto's Liberal Democratic Party will not be able to put together a coalition that ++ will give it a comfortable majority in the lower house of Parliament.Instead, the Liberal Democrats might run a minority government, controlling the Cabinet but being forced to cooperate with other parties on a case-by-case basis to enact legislation.
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NEWS
March 18, 1991
Welcome as South Africa's decision to scrap its apartheid land and housing laws may be, mere repeal of noxious laws does not compensate for years of dispossession. Millions of blacks were deprived of their homes and forcibly moved to segregated locations in the past four decades. Many were denied home ownership. There will have to be some system of reparation and redress before the country can really become a non-racial democracy.The situation in South Africa today can be compared, perhaps fancifully, with the demolition of the Berlin Wall.
NEWS
November 29, 1990
Lord Pearce, 89, chairman of a British government panel in 1972 that rejected a proposed settlement in the then rebel colony of Rhodesia on grounds most blacks opposed it, died Monday in southern England. Mr. Pearce visited what was then Rhodesia and is now Zimbabwe as head of the government panel in 1972. On Nov. 11, 1965, the then white minority government of Ian Smith had declared itself free of all remaining colonial links with Britain. Britain, which hoped to steer Rhodesia to full independence under eventual black rule, said the declaration was illegal.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 27, 1991
DURBAN, South Africa -- In an agreement likely to hasten the start of talks on South Africa's future, the country's two most prominent black resistance movements announced yesterday that they had reached a consensus on negotiating with the white-minority government.The African National Congress and the Pan-Africanist Congress, smaller rival, said they had agreed that a conference of all political parties should be held as soon as possible to work out methods for the transfer of power to the country's black majority.
NEWS
March 4, 1991
"Kuwait is liberated," proclaimed President Bush last Wednesday night.The news was greeted with justifiable jubilation by Americans who can certainly be grateful the war was won so swiftly and at such little cost in lives of U.S. and allied soldiers.But now that the victory has been achieved, we might do well to reflect upon just what "liberation" means.To illustrate the point, let us devise a scenario -- a scenario which, granted, is improbable but which nonetheless may serve its purpose.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 18, 1993
TOKYO -- With the ruling Liberal Democratic Party facing probable defeat in the powerful lower house of Parliament, Japan's voters went to the polls today to choose between stability and change.In his final appeal to the voters yesterday, Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa insisted that Japan would be thrown into chaos by any coalition "dragged around by the Socialists."Former Liberal Democrat Morihiro Hosokawa, leader of the Japan New Party fighting its first lower-house battle, acknowledged that a defeat for the Liberal Democrats would create "an uncertain, unstable, fluid political situation."
NEWS
By HARTFORD COURANT | May 12, 2005
Canada premier sets confidence vote; foes demand resignation TORONTO - Prime Minister Paul Martin said yesterday that a vote of confidence in his scandal-rocked government would be held May 19, but his opponents demanded he resign immediately and vowed to obstruct Parliament until the vote is held. The opposition accused him of delaying the vote, saying he was using a visit by Queen Elizabeth II as a tactic to put it off. Martin's minority government has been paralyzed for months by verbal brawls over a corruption scandal within his Liberal Party.
NEWS
June 13, 1991
Anyone who has followed the escalating violence in South Africa's black townships must have wondered why blacks, who for most of this century have been oppressed by a white minority government and who now stand on the threshold of achieving political empowerment in their native land, have suddenly fallen to fighting among themselves.For months now the African National Congress, the country's oldest anti-apartheid organization, has claimed the government is deliberately fomenting the violence as a way of scuttling negotiations aimed at establishing a true multi-racial democracy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 28, 1999
GENEVA -- Swiss and German bankers played a key role in propping up South Africa's apartheid government, according to a report last week by groups seeking billions of dollars in reparations and debt forgiveness for the current South African government.When most governments around the world were boycotting South Africa under United Nations sanctions, major Swiss and German banks continued to give billions of dollars in loans, the groups said.American banks started to scale back their involvement in South Africa from 1985 to 1986, but money continued to flow into the country.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | May 17, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Black nationalist leader Nelson Mandela warned yesterday that violence would spread to white sections of South Africa if the government does not act decisively to stop the carnage in black townships.Mr. Mandela, deputy president of the African National Congress, urged his supporters not to attack white areas because "there are many innocent people there who have nothing to do with the violence."But he told mourners in Kagiso township at a memorial service for victims of a massacre last weekend, "The government must know that as long as it allows this violence to continue . . . there is a danger that this violence might spread to the white areas."
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