Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMinority Employees
IN THE NEWS

Minority Employees

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 5, 1996
NEW YORK -- An unfolding scandal at Texaco Inc. widened yesterday as federal prosecutors in White Plains opened a criminal investigation to determine whether senior company executives illegally destroyed documents sought in a discrimination lawsuit, people with knowledge of the situation said.Already, subpoenas have been issued seeking a number of pieces of evidence including original audio tapes secretly recorded by a former Texaco employee. In the tapes, senior executives can be heard discussing plans to shred records and belittling the company's minority employees with racial epithets.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2010
Ray Miller had three different stints as the Orioles' pitching coach spread over 11 seasons and one as manager that lasted two years. But his legacy in helping develop a host of talented pitchers — five different 20-game winners and a pair of Cy Young Award winners — made Miller an obvious candidate for the team's Hall of Fame. Five years after he last wore an Orioles uniform, that legacy was celebrated Saturday night during a pre-game ceremony at Camden Yards in which Miller was honored along with late Orioles manager Johnny Oates and Len Johnston, who held several positions in the team's minor league system for more than 30 years.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1996
Local black leaders have been holding meetings with officials of Howard County General Hospital to address what they call mounting racial problems at the Columbia hospital.The meetings, which began about two months ago, have come amid claims of racial tension among hospital staff members at all levels.In more than a dozen recent interviews with The Sun, former and current doctors, nurses and administrators -- black and white -- charge that minority employees consistently are barred from positions of authority, including managerial posts and committee appointments.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,[Sun Reporter] | February 25, 2007
Within Carroll County school system's work force, women employees drastically outnumber men, minorities remain few in number, and staff members close to retirement are increasing in the ranks, according to a new diversity report. That report compared work force data from January 2002 to data from January 2007. Overall, the employee pool has grown 25 percent to 3,690, from 2,952, the report stated. Similar growth percentages appeared in the separate areas of teaching and administration.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,[Sun Reporter] | February 25, 2007
Within Carroll County school system's work force, women employees drastically outnumber men, minorities remain few in number, and staff members close to retirement are increasing in the ranks, according to a new diversity report. That report compared work force data from January 2002 to data from January 2007. Overall, the employee pool has grown 25 percent to 3,690, from 2,952, the report stated. Similar growth percentages appeared in the separate areas of teaching and administration.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1996
Local black leaders have been holding meetings with officials of Howard County General Hospital to address what they call mounting racial problems at the Columbia hospital.The continuing series of meetings, which began about two months ago, have come amid claims of racial tension among staff members at all levels.In more than a dozen recent interviews with The Sun, former and current doctors, nurses and administrators -- black and white -- charge that minority employees consistently are barred from positions of authority at the hospital, including managerial posts and committee appointments.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Black federal employees were more than twice as likely to be fired as their white, Hispanic or Asian counterparts, according to a report made public yesterday by the Office of Personnel Management.The disparity was seen regardless of occupational category, pay level, education, agency, geographic location, age, performance rating, seniority or attendance record."The racial gap persists within every category of risk we assessed," Dr. Hilary Silver, a sociologist from Brown University who conducted the study for the agency, said in a telephone interview yesterday.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer Staff writer Robert Hilson contributed to this article | April 1, 1993
The Rev. Jesse L. Jackson was quoted yesterday giving a incorrect percentage of non-playing jobs held by minority employees of the Orioles -- 9 percent (22 of 176). The percentage for 22 of 176 is 12.5 percent. Moreover, Mr. Jackson, the article pointed out, failed to count at least two other minority employees non-playing positions.* The Sun regrets the errorsThe Rev. Jesse Jackson unveiled a nationwide campaign to improve Major League Baseball's minority hiring practices during news conference on the sidewalk outside Oriole Park yesterday.
NEWS
By Kenneth Arroyo Roldan and Gary M. Stern | October 16, 2006
When PepsiCo named Indra Nooyi its chief executive officer in August, several articles extolled the company for hiring a female CEO. Ms. Nooyi's appointment was also newsworthy because of the paucity of minorities who have been allowed into the executive suite. But most articles avoided the bigger point: Why haven't more mid- to senior managers who are minorities been permitted into the corridors of power? And more important, what needs to be done to expand the opportunities for women, Latinos and African-Americans in corporate America?
BUSINESS
By Himanee Gupta and Himanee Gupta,Seattle Times | February 3, 1992
SEATTLE -- She was young, blond and light-skinned. She had a slim, athletic build. She came from an middle- to upper-class background, and she projected an image of sorority-girl enthusiasm.She represented "the Nordstrom look."Tom Nesby, a management consultant who specializes in helping companies deal with multicultural workplaces, created that composite four years ago after asking employees to describe Nordstrom's corporate culture, the shoppers to whom it caters and the personal traits of a worker likely to rise in its ranks.
NEWS
By Kenneth Arroyo Roldan and Gary M. Stern | October 16, 2006
When PepsiCo named Indra Nooyi its chief executive officer in August, several articles extolled the company for hiring a female CEO. Ms. Nooyi's appointment was also newsworthy because of the paucity of minorities who have been allowed into the executive suite. But most articles avoided the bigger point: Why haven't more mid- to senior managers who are minorities been permitted into the corridors of power? And more important, what needs to be done to expand the opportunities for women, Latinos and African-Americans in corporate America?
NEWS
February 18, 2004
Ruth V. Minor, who worked for the Maryland Workshop for the Blind and was an active churchgoer, died of a bone infection Sunday at a daughter's West Baltimore home. She was 88. She was born Ruth Virginia Minor in Louisa County, Va., where she also attended county public schools. She moved to Baltimore in 1938 and later went to work in food preparation for the Maryland Workshop. "She helped the blind who operated newsstands in office buildings with the serving of food," said a daughter, the Rev. Ruby M. Purnell, assistant pastor of Grace Memorial Baptist Church.
NEWS
By Brian W. Jones | November 29, 1998
AS THE U.S. Supreme Court opened its term last month, the nation was witness to a demonstration by liberal policy-makers and civil rights activists on the steps of the court in support of "diversity" among the justices' law clerks. The activists were protesting that among the 394 law clerks employed by the current justices since 1972, only 1.7 percent of them have been black and 1.2 percent have been Hispanic.None of the 34 clerks serving the justices is black. One African-American lawmaker suggested that the dearth of black and other minority law clerks is evidence that "the standard-bearer of justice is discriminating against our people."
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 5, 1996
NEW YORK -- An unfolding scandal at Texaco Inc. widened yesterday as federal prosecutors in White Plains opened a criminal investigation to determine whether senior company executives illegally destroyed documents sought in a discrimination lawsuit, people with knowledge of the situation said.Already, subpoenas have been issued seeking a number of pieces of evidence including original audio tapes secretly recorded by a former Texaco employee. In the tapes, senior executives can be heard discussing plans to shred records and belittling the company's minority employees with racial epithets.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1996
Local black leaders have been holding meetings with officials of Howard County General Hospital to address what they call mounting racial problems at the Columbia hospital.The continuing series of meetings, which began about two months ago, have come amid claims of racial tension among staff members at all levels.In more than a dozen recent interviews with The Sun, former and current doctors, nurses and administrators -- black and white -- charge that minority employees consistently are barred from positions of authority at the hospital, including managerial posts and committee appointments.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1996
Local black leaders have been holding meetings with officials of Howard County General Hospital to address what they call mounting racial problems at the Columbia hospital.The meetings, which began about two months ago, have come amid claims of racial tension among hospital staff members at all levels.In more than a dozen recent interviews with The Sun, former and current doctors, nurses and administrators -- black and white -- charge that minority employees consistently are barred from positions of authority, including managerial posts and committee appointments.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | December 17, 1993
Nearly 100 Mass Transit Administration employees crowded a hearing room last night to complain about discrimination at the state agency.The hearing, sponsored by the Legislative Black Caucus, was billed as a fact-finding effort in response to recent complaints legislators have received from MTA workers who say they have been victimized by age, gender or racial bias within the agency."
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff writer | February 4, 1992
The man on the phone sounded alarmed about what he had just seen: a black man apparently posing as a deputy sheriff, walking around Annapolis in uniform, even carrying a revolver.The man called Anne Arundel County Sheriff Joseph Alton because he thought Alton should knowabout this immediately. Alton did know, because Alton had deputized the tall, black man, put him in the dark blue uniform, given him the gun and sent him out on the streets of Annapolis that day in 1951.Thus, the city had its first glimpse of George Phelps Jr. in the role of enforcer and keeper of the peace, a role Phelps would later turn into a successful business and be called upon to play time and again in the city.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Black federal employees were more than twice as likely to be fired as their white, Hispanic or Asian counterparts, according to a report made public yesterday by the Office of Personnel Management.The disparity was seen regardless of occupational category, pay level, education, agency, geographic location, age, performance rating, seniority or attendance record."The racial gap persists within every category of risk we assessed," Dr. Hilary Silver, a sociologist from Brown University who conducted the study for the agency, said in a telephone interview yesterday.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1994
CINCINNATI -- Major-league owners picked a curious place to release their latest report on baseball's record of hiring minorities and women.Marge Schott's back yard.Baseball still is smarting from the black eye it suffered last year, when Schott, the earthy owner of the Cincinnati Reds, was exposed for having allegedly uttered racial slurs about black employees. But that embarrassment was put aside yesterday, as officials in town for the owners meetings released a report showing they are making steady progress in their work to hire and promote more minorities.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.