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NEWS
By Edward L. Heard Jr. and Edward L. Heard Jr.,Evening Sun Staff | July 2, 1991
The head of the Maryland Minority Contractors Association says the organization will continue to campaign against Kurt L. Schmoke's bid for a second term as mayor of Baltimore.Members of the association picketed outside the B&O Railroad Museum on June 21 while Schmoke was announcing his candidacy. The organization has also passed out thousands of fliers accusing the Schmoke administration of failing to enforce the city's minority set-aside law.The fliers say: "Thanks to Mayor Schmoke, minority and women businesses are in financial trouble!"
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NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | August 3, 2014
If you are black and have done business with the city or the state - or have even thought of it - you probably know the name Arnold Jolivet. If you are a politician who has anything at all to do with granting government contracts, you definitely know that name. People like me, on the other hand, who go about our lives without giving a thought about procurement processes, probably know nothing of the man that a city official, a construction contractor and a staunch critic of city government admiringly described to me as a warrior.
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NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1999
Board members of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra have adopted the city's minority contracting rules to expand the use of women and minorities on maintenance and renovation projects at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.In a resolution read before the Board of Estimates yesterday, BSO board members told city officials that while the orchestra had been inclusive in many areas, it failed to show the same level of diversity in its renovation contracts, which sometimes amount to millions of dollars.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Arnold M. Jolivet, a longtime advocate for minority- and women-owned businesses who was a familiar presence at City Hall, died of complications from heart disease Sunday morning at Sinai Hospital. The Village of Cross Keys resident was 71. "Mr. Jolivet was a consistent, devoted and vocal champion for minority businesses," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement. "His unapologetic approach to overcoming obstacles will always be his legacy. He understood, as I do, that progress cannot be achieved without economic parity for minority-owned businesses.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | November 29, 2007
Private groups that receive state bond money from the General Assembly would have to meet minority contracting goals under a proposal discussed yesterday by the state Board of Public Works. The legislature annually approves tens of millions of dollars in bond funds to assist organizations ranging from the Junior League to Johns Hopkins. But despite discussion of the issue over the years, the grants have never been subjected to the state's goal of ensuring that contracts have at least 25 percent minority- or women-owned businesses participating.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1999
The Maryland Minority Contractors' Association endorsed mayoral candidate Lawrence A. Bell III yesterday, saying that under Bell's administration, minority-owned businesses would "get a better deal."Arnold M. Jolivet, president of the 1,000-member organization, said the City Council president was one of the chief sponsors of the 1989 bill that created goals for hiring minority contractors on city projects."He has worked hard on behalf of minority contractors," Jolivet said.As Jolivet spoke, about 60 huge trucks formed a caravan on North Avenue.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2002
After 22 years in business, Justin Mann has built a $17 million business installing floors in office buildings and other construction projects. Yesterday, the owner of Minneapolis-based TCM Contract Flooring mingled with others who have found success in opening minority-owned contracting businesses as they gathered for their annual conference. The National Association of Minority Contractors conference runs through tomorrow at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Baltimore. A decade ago, the contractors said, they would have been hard-pressed to find such lucrative businesses owned by minorities.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | December 13, 2007
The Board of Public Works delayed action yesterday on a proposal to require more participation by minority- and women-owned businesses in private construction projects that receive state funds. Gov. Martin O'Malley said he supports the idea but is waiting for guidance from the state attorney general's office. Nonetheless, minority business advocates declared victory at yesterday's meeting, saying the attention the board brought to the issue has already produced results from the hospitals, colleges and universities, the primary beneficiaries of the funds.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2001
The awarding of an emergency contract to repair the intersection of Howard and Lombard streets sparked an unusually heated confrontation yesterday before the city's Board of Estimates, as minority contractors accused the winning bidder of not doing more to include minority businesses in the $1.35 million contract. Jessup-based Cherry Hill Construction won the contract on a 3-2 vote, with City Council President Sheila Dixon and Comptroller Joan M. Pratt voting no, saying the company should have tried harder to include minority businesses.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 8, 1996
WASHINGTON -- After a long review of affirmative action, the Clinton administration has decided to suspend -- for at least three years -- all federal programs that reserve some contracts exclusively for minority and women-owned companies, officials said yesterday.The officials said the three-year moratorium on set-aside programs, which have proved to be the most hotly debated type of affirmative action, would include such stringent conditions for reintroducing the programs that it was doubtful they would ever return.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
A small but vocal group of community leaders rallied Monday morning on a west Baltimore street corner to pressure Coppin State University and its contractors to hire more neighborhood residents during construction of an $87 million science and technology building — the latest in a series of efforts to force government-supported projects to hire in the city. With the sound of construction equipment in the background, civil rights activist Marvin L. "Doc" Cheatham Sr. said Coppin and the contractor, Barton Malow Co., have reneged on a commitment to hire local residents for jobs.
NEWS
By Harold Scott | April 7, 2010
Councilman Bill Henry's proposal to exclude non-union laborers from working on city-funded construction projects is already causing great concern among the small business community, particularly for those of us whose companies are black or minority owned. Mr. Henry introduced a bill March 22 that calls for mandatory community partnership agreements (more commonly called project labor agreements or PLAs) on all taxpayer-supported city construction projects of more than $5 million.
NEWS
By Robbie Whelan and Julie Scharper | March 26, 2010
Former Mayor Sheila Dixon has a new job, with a group that has long been a strong supporter of her, and vice versa. Dixon said has been helping the Maryland Minority Contractors Association with marketing and is in the process of hashing out a permanent role with the organization. "All of this is preliminary," said Dixon, who left office Feb. 4 as part of a plea deal to settle criminal charges of embezzlement and perjury. "We're still in discussions." Dixon said she has been working part time to help the association plan a minority business showcase at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture next week.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | June 5, 2009
In an effort to provide more opportunities for businesses owned by women and minorities, Baltimore County has increased to 15 percent the participation those companies should have in government contracts. "We have seen a lot of growth in these businesses," County Executive James T. Smith Jr. said yesterday. "This order should enhance our efforts to help minority and women's businesses succeed." He put contractors on notice that "waivers will be granted in only the rarest circumstances."
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | July 17, 2008
The Board of Public Works delayed action yesterday on a contract with a bus company that failed to meet Maryland's minority business goals, though two of its three members said they believe the state has taken sufficient steps to ensure the company's future compliance. The contract with First Transit Inc. had raised the hackles of minority contractors because the company failed to meet the original goal that minority subcontractors perform 30 percent of the work. Last year, the company got a waiver from the Maryland Aviation Administration to reduce that goal to 13 percent on its contract to run shuttle buses that transport passengers to and from parking lots at the Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Bradley Olson and Gadi Dechter and Bradley Olson,Sun reporters | May 1, 2008
The state Board of Public Works yesterday wrestled with two claims by aggrieved minority-owned businesses, postponing a $45 million airport shuttle-bus contract and approving a $9 million hospital construction project over the objections of advocates. Arnold M. Jolivet, president of the Maryland Minority Contractors Association, failed to persuade the board to reject a state-funded contract with Baltimore-based Whiting Turner Contracting Co. to build new operating rooms for the University of Maryland Medical System.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2005
Robert Lee Clay, a prominent contractor whose political and business dealings were dogged by controversy and who twice prevailed over charges he was involved in shootings, was found dead yesterday morning in his Reservoir Hill office. Baltimore police said Mr. Clay had been shot but would not specify whether the death was a homicide or suicide. Mr. Clay's daughter, Sharon Clay, who found him on the floor of his office on Brookfield Avenue, said he had mentioned to her that he had "several death threats made against him" in recent weeks.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2005
Friends and associates of Robert Lee Clay, a prominent Baltimore businessman and advocate for minority firms, remained shocked and saddened yesterday over his unresolved shooting death Monday. They also refused to accept indications from city police that Clay, 58, might have committed suicide. Police said Monday that Clay had been shot, but an autopsy to determine whether his death was a homicide or suicide was not complete yesterday, a police spokesman said. "I am more than shocked," said Arnold Jolivet, president of the American Minority Contractors and Businesses Association Inc. in Washington.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | December 13, 2007
The Board of Public Works delayed action yesterday on a proposal to require more participation by minority- and women-owned businesses in private construction projects that receive state funds. Gov. Martin O'Malley said he supports the idea but is waiting for guidance from the state attorney general's office. Nonetheless, minority business advocates declared victory at yesterday's meeting, saying the attention the board brought to the issue has already produced results from the hospitals, colleges and universities, the primary beneficiaries of the funds.
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