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BUSINESS
April 10, 2010
Maryland minority businesses won $84.6 million in contracts and procurements from projects that were partially or fully funded through the federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, according to Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration. The figure represents 14 percent of the total amount - more than $600 million - awarded to Maryland businesses under the federal economic stimulus plan, most of which went to transportation projects in the state. The percentage falls below the 25 percent threshold set by Maryland statute for distributing state-funded contracts.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Arnold M. Jolivet, a longtime advocate for minority- and women-owned businesses who was a familiar presence at City Hall, died of complications from heart disease Sunday morning at Sinai Hospital. The Village of Cross Keys resident was 71. "Mr. Jolivet was a consistent, devoted and vocal champion for minority businesses," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement. "His unapologetic approach to overcoming obstacles will always be his legacy. He understood, as I do, that progress cannot be achieved without economic parity for minority-owned businesses.
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NEWS
August 26, 2013
I read the letter regarding the State Highway Administration sign shop with interest until I noticed a lack of interest on the writer's part about the financial soundness of the state making its own signs ("Private sector should make Md. road signs," Aug. 24). After learning of writer Roger A. Campos' minority business interests, his true intentions became clear. It is a shame that he sees a government operation as a source of income without regard for improving the operation. No where in the letter did he demonstrate how minority or small-business involvement would benefit anyone other than the businesses he represents.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
Minority-owned businesses can receive help expanding, securing contracts and accessing large supply chains through a new center that opened Friday, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced. The Minority Business Development Agency at Johns Hopkins University will provide consulting services for established entrepreneurs and the owners of start-ups as a way to create and keep jobs in Baltimore. The center, known as MBDA Business Center-Baltimore, also is intended to help the companies tap into international markets.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Maryland plans to steer to minority and women-owned businesses 29 percent of the nearly $8 billion a year it spends on contracts, increasing a target that was already among the most aggressive in the nation, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown said Monday. The new goal - an increase from the current 25 percent - would if attained have a profound impact on boosting minority-owned construction firms, IT contractors, engineers and other companies in Maryland that have historically struggled to land state government contracts, supporters said.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
Minority-owned businesses can receive help expanding, securing contracts and accessing large supply chains through a new center that opened Friday, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced. The Minority Business Development Agency at Johns Hopkins University will provide consulting services for established entrepreneurs and the owners of start-ups as a way to create and keep jobs in Baltimore. The center, known as MBDA Business Center-Baltimore, also is intended to help the companies tap into international markets.
NEWS
April 19, 1994
Almost any economic development is worth pursuing, but minority economic development is especially worthy. It shows a community's commitment to creating opportunities for those who might otherwise not have them. And it is an added plus to any jurisdiction's efforts to generate jobs and a healthy economy.For a while, Howard County's effort in this area seemed on the skids. The county's economic development office was in a state of flux, including its transition to a quasi-public development authority and a rapid turnover of directors.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 4, 2004
A $1.3 million study was approved yesterday by the state Board of Public Works to determine whether Maryland gives enough work to minority businesses. National Economic Research Associates was hired to perform the assessment after a rival company that had complained about the bidding process dropped its appeal. The study will compare the number and availability of minority- and female-owned businesses with the state's use of such contractors. It is a legal precursor to the creation of a program that will set goals for using minority businesses on state contracts.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and By Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2000
The leader of a coalition of black organizations in Anne Arundel County is calling for legislation that would steer more county contracts to minority-owned businesses, possibly using a long-standing Prince George's County law as a model. That law says 30 percent of contracts must go to minority-owned businesses. Clemon H. Wesley, founder and co-chairman of RESPECT, says the county must do more to help minority-owned concerns get a share of the nearly $100 million the county spends each year on procurement.
NEWS
By Glenn Yago | January 21, 1999
BEHIND all the good news about the economy lies a dismaying truth: Millions of hard-working Americans have not shared in the fruits of the longest boom in the country's history. Such disparity eventually will undermine the boom.So when President Clinton, Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin, Commerce Secretary Bill Daley and hundreds of Wall Streeters recently gathered in New York at the invitation of Rev. Jesse Jackson, they were advised to avoid the ineffectual gestures that have dominated discussions of minority economic participation over the past decades.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Lt. Gov.  Anthony G. Brown released an eight-point plan Wednesday that he said will increase the number of minority-owned businesses that win state contracts. Maryland already has one of the highest goals in the nation to award state business to companies owned and operated by women and minorities, firms that have traditionally struggled to land such contracts. Brown's plan, which is part of his bid for governor, suggests making it easier for businesses to get the certification required to compete for those contracts, as well as create new programs that encourage private companies to hire firms minority owned contracts.
BUSINESS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Baltimore City officials are investigating a complaint filed Wednesday by two minority- and women-owned businesses against health care giant Aetna for not using their services despite a contractual agreement to do so. Thomas B. Corey, chief of Baltimore's Minority & Women's Business Opportunity Office, said he will research why Aetna did not use the subcontractors, CASI Inc. and JUL Enterprise, despite committing to when it applied for the city...
NEWS
August 26, 2013
I read the letter regarding the State Highway Administration sign shop with interest until I noticed a lack of interest on the writer's part about the financial soundness of the state making its own signs ("Private sector should make Md. road signs," Aug. 24). After learning of writer Roger A. Campos' minority business interests, his true intentions became clear. It is a shame that he sees a government operation as a source of income without regard for improving the operation. No where in the letter did he demonstrate how minority or small-business involvement would benefit anyone other than the businesses he represents.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Maryland plans to steer to minority and women-owned businesses 29 percent of the nearly $8 billion a year it spends on contracts, increasing a target that was already among the most aggressive in the nation, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown said Monday. The new goal - an increase from the current 25 percent - would if attained have a profound impact on boosting minority-owned construction firms, IT contractors, engineers and other companies in Maryland that have historically struggled to land state government contracts, supporters said.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
The Great Gourmet is Kimberly Scott's way of introducing the world to Maryland seafood. Her Eastern Shore company sells crab cakes, oysters and clams to wholesale and retail markets. In 2006, just three years after opening, The Great Gourmet was logging $1.8 million in revenue. Three years after that, Scott had revenue of $3.8 million, 15 employees and a place on Inc. Magazine's 500/5000 fastest-growing companies list. With her company expanding, Scott turned to Richard Loeffler at the Eastern Region Small Business and Technology Development Center at Salisbury University in 2009 for advice about a small-business loan that would allow her to move from rented space to a building of her own in Federalsburg with more freezer space.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
After a two-week delay, the state Board of Public Works approved a $205 million contract Wednesday under which an arm of Montreal-based Bombardier Inc. will operate the Camden and Brunswick lines of the MARC commuter train system. The board's unanimous approval came after concerns over the level of minority business participation in the contract and Bombardier's links with Iran were resolved. The contract was removed from the board's agenda two weeks ago after the Maryland Minority Contractors Association raised concerns that the roughly 8 percent share of the work earmarked for minority contractors was insufficient.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 8, 2005
FOR EIGHT years now, Steve Walden and Raymond Whye have been doing business at Howard and Lexington streets in what we used to call the heart of downtown. The business exists on a sidewalk. It consists of a beat-up card table offering bargains of the day. As it happens, Walden and Whye are black. They are today's link to Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and William Donald Schaefer, who agreed last week that a state program to help minority businesses "needs to end." Mr. Governor and Mr. Comptroller, say hello to Mr. Walden and Mr. Whye.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has created an advisory council to help improve the city's minority and women-owned business enterprise program, the mayor's office announced Wednesday. The 25-member Mayor's Council on Minority and Women-Owned Business Enterprises will be headed by Robert L. Wallace, author and CEO of Bithgroup Technologies. Maria Welch Martinez, CEO of Respira Medical, will serve as vice-chair. Other members include local businesspeople and representatives from the City Council and state legislature.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
Maryland small businesses gripe that they can't get loans from banks. Lenders complain of a dearth of borrowers. Is there any way to get these two together? The state is going to try, under legislation expected to be signed into law today. Maryland will use a carrot — or, rather, up to $50 million in deposits — to encourage banks here to lend to small businesses. Basically, participating banks that make loans to small businesses will receive an equal amount of deposits from the state.
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