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By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1996
The county Planning Commission did not violate the state's open meetings law when it began requiring people who develop small subdivisions on Carroll farmland to meet adequate facilities standards, a state board has ruled.Del. Joseph M. Getty wrote to the state Open Meetings `f Compliance Board on April 4, accusing the commission of secretly and illegally voting to change a long-held practice for handling subdivisions of three lots or less in agricultural zones.For 18 years before Oct. 17, 1995 -- when the commission closed its meeting to consult with its attorney -- so-called minor subdivisions were exempt from adequate facilities tests, Getty said.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2003
The county commissioners will hold a public hearing tonight on proposed amendments to the county's adequate-facilities law - amendments that they all seem to oppose. Their quandary centers on possible infringements on the development rights of farmers. The amendments, which were requested by the commissioners, would apply countywide to all building lots and would add years to the development process for farmers. "I just want to know how many lots and where they are," Commissioner Dean L. Minnich said.
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NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1998
The County Commissioners may enact a long-awaited residential growth-control measure tomorrow night after a public meeting on the 14-page bill.The commissioners revised their adequate facilities bill Dec. 17 to make it more palatable to bankers, builders and developers, who had severely criticized a clause that would have affected owners of recorded lots.The bill initially would have barred building on recorded lots -- lots recorded in the county court as eligible for development -- if the lots were in parts of the county that failed to pass adequate-facilities tests for schools, roads and public safety.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1998
The County Commissioners enacted a residential growth-control bill yesterday that is virtually identical to a measure they rejected two weeks ago.The bill, which took effect immediately, limits residential building to 6,000 lots over the next six years. The measure will allow the commissioners to direct housing developments to areas where schools, roads and public services are adequate and restrict it elsewhere.The commissioners' approval of the legislation came after Commissioner Richard T. Yates became convinced the bill would give the commissioners the tools to control growth.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2003
The county commissioners will hold a public hearing tonight on proposed amendments to the county's adequate-facilities law - amendments that they all seem to oppose. Their quandary centers on possible infringements on the development rights of farmers. The amendments, which were requested by the commissioners, would apply countywide to all building lots and would add years to the development process for farmers. "I just want to know how many lots and where they are," Commissioner Dean L. Minnich said.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1996
An amended version of a controversial bill easing the rules for developing Carroll County farmland passed the General Assembly yesterday.The legislation, which requires the signature of Gov. Parris N. Glendening to become law, has widened the rift between slow-growth advocates and members of the farming community who say they have been unable to develop their land because of restrictive county policies.Under the proposal, sponsored by Carroll Republican Sen. Larry E. Haines, farmers could develop up to four lots without having to prove that public facilities -- such as roads, schools and other services -- were adequate to handle the growth.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1998
The County Commissioners put the final touches yesterday on a growth-control measure that would limit residential development to 1,000 units a year.The bill, which is intended to direct growth to areas where schools, roads and public services are adequate, was altered slightly during a three-hour work session attended by developers, attorneys, municipal officials and representatives of the Carroll Economic Development Commission.The commissioners plan to enact the revised measure at 8: 30 a.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1996
The mayors of Hampstead, Manchester and Sykesville have joined the growing list of concerned residents and officials asking Gov. Parris N. Glendening to veto a controversial land-use bill.In a May 3 letter to the governor, the mayors said Senate Bill 649 would have a severe impact on their communities, where "infrastructure is strained by the recent amount of residential growth."Said Manchester Mayor Elmer C. Lippy Jr., "This bill is chaotic in terms of land use. The letter will at least put the germ of the veto idea in the governor's mind."
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1998
The County Commissioners enacted a residential growth-control bill yesterday that is virtually identical to a measure they rejected two weeks ago.The bill, which took effect immediately, limits residential building to 6,000 lots over the next six years. The measure will allow the commissioners to direct housing developments to areas where schools, roads and public services are adequate and restrict it elsewhere.The commissioners' approval of the legislation came after Commissioner Richard T. Yates became convinced the bill would give the commissioners the tools to control growth.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Marina Sarris and Greg Tasker and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1996
The Maryland House of Delegates gave preliminary approval yesterday to a watered-down bill that would loosen the rules on ** developing Carroll County farmland.The delegation bill received the preliminary OK a day after a committee amended the measure to reduce from six to four the '' number of lots that can be developed in agricultural zones and to add a "sunset clause," which means the legislation would be in effect only for two years.The bill is expected to get final House approval tomorrow, and the Senate is expected to pass the watered-down House version.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1998
The County Commissioners put the final touches yesterday on a growth-control measure that would limit residential development to 1,000 units a year.The bill, which is intended to direct growth to areas where schools, roads and public services are adequate, was altered slightly during a three-hour work session attended by developers, attorneys, municipal officials and representatives of the Carroll Economic Development Commission.The commissioners plan to enact the revised measure at 8: 30 a.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1998
The County Commissioners put the final touches yesterday on a growth-control measure that would limit residential development to 1,000 units a year.The bill, which is intended to direct growth to areas where schools, roads and public services are adequate, was altered slightly during a three-hour work session attended by developers, attorneys, municipal officials and representatives of the Carroll Economic Development Commission.The commissioners plan to enact the revised measure at 8: 30 a.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1998
The County Commissioners may enact a long-awaited residential growth-control measure tomorrow night after a public meeting on the 14-page bill.The commissioners revised their adequate facilities bill Dec. 17 to make it more palatable to bankers, builders and developers, who had severely criticized a clause that would have affected owners of recorded lots.The bill initially would have barred building on recorded lots -- lots recorded in the county court as eligible for development -- if the lots were in parts of the county that failed to pass adequate-facilities tests for schools, roads and public safety.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1996
State Sen. Timothy R. Ferguson told county farmers last night that he wants to reintroduce a bill that would allow them to carve as many as six lots from their property without having to go through the county's subdivision process.Gov. Parris N. Glendening vetoed a similar bill last spring.The difference in his proposal, Ferguson told a crowd of more than 50 people at a Carroll County Landowners' Association meeting in Westminster, is that the bill would apply to farmers only.The bill vetoed by the governor would have helped developers and builders as well as farmers, Ferguson said.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1996
The county Planning Commission did not violate the state's open meetings law when it began requiring people who develop small subdivisions on Carroll farmland to meet adequate facilities standards, a state board has ruled.Del. Joseph M. Getty wrote to the state Open Meetings `f Compliance Board on April 4, accusing the commission of secretly and illegally voting to change a long-held practice for handling subdivisions of three lots or less in agricultural zones.For 18 years before Oct. 17, 1995 -- when the commission closed its meeting to consult with its attorney -- so-called minor subdivisions were exempt from adequate facilities tests, Getty said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1996
The mayors of Hampstead, Manchester and Sykesville have joined the growing list of concerned residents and officials asking Gov. Parris N. Glendening to veto a controversial land-use bill.In a May 3 letter to the governor, the mayors said Senate Bill 649 would have a severe impact on their communities, where "infrastructure is strained by the recent amount of residential growth."Said Manchester Mayor Elmer C. Lippy Jr., "This bill is chaotic in terms of land use. The letter will at least put the germ of the veto idea in the governor's mind."
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1998
The County Commissioners put the final touches yesterday on a growth-control measure that would limit residential development to 1,000 units a year.The bill, which is intended to direct growth to areas where schools, roads and public services are adequate, was altered slightly during a three-hour work session attended by developers, attorneys, municipal officials and representatives of the Carroll Economic Development Commission.The commissioners plan to enact the revised measure at 8: 30 a.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1996
State Sen. Timothy R. Ferguson told county farmers last night that he wants to reintroduce a bill that would allow them to carve as many as six lots from their property without having to go through the county's subdivision process.Gov. Parris N. Glendening vetoed a similar bill last spring.The difference in his proposal, Ferguson told a crowd of more than 50 people at a Carroll County Landowners' Association meeting in Westminster, is that the bill would apply to farmers only.The bill vetoed by the governor would have helped developers and builders as well as farmers, Ferguson said.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1996
An amended version of a controversial bill easing the rules for developing Carroll County farmland passed the General Assembly yesterday.The legislation, which requires the signature of Gov. Parris N. Glendening to become law, has widened the rift between slow-growth advocates and members of the farming community who say they have been unable to develop their land because of restrictive county policies.Under the proposal, sponsored by Carroll Republican Sen. Larry E. Haines, farmers could develop up to four lots without having to prove that public facilities -- such as roads, schools and other services -- were adequate to handle the growth.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Marina Sarris and Greg Tasker and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1996
The Maryland House of Delegates gave preliminary approval yesterday to a watered-down bill that would loosen the rules on ** developing Carroll County farmland.The delegation bill received the preliminary OK a day after a committee amended the measure to reduce from six to four the '' number of lots that can be developed in agricultural zones and to add a "sunset clause," which means the legislation would be in effect only for two years.The bill is expected to get final House approval tomorrow, and the Senate is expected to pass the watered-down House version.
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