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By Bob Strauss and Bob Strauss,Los Angeles Daily News | April 18, 1995
When Minnie Driver first read the script for the Irish period romance "Circle of Friends," she immediately fell in love with the central female role of Bernadette."
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NEWS
August 21, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS The spell has ended "Wild" Bill Hagy gave Orioles fans a second show for the price of one when Section 34 was the place to be at Memorial Stadium. Sports baltimoresun.com/connolly An unhealthy problem A computer glitch at CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, the state's largest health insurer, blew Sharon Noble's life into disarray. And she might not be the only one affected. Business baltimoresun.com/consuming OTHER VOICES Jean Marbella on new library -- Maryland Rashod Ollison on R. Kelly's epic -- Today Rick Maese on Michael Vick -- Sports Eileen Ambrose on mortgages -- Business 5 THINGS TO DO TODAY Project Natale jazz show -- Soak up the jazz sounds of Project Natale at the Outdoor Summer Concert Series at Carroll Park, Washington Boulevard and Bayard Street.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Eric R. Danton and Eric R. Danton,Hartford Courant | October 14, 2004
Guess who's back with a new album? Yes, R.E.M. But also William Shatner. That's right, Captain Kirk has returned with Has Been (Shout Factory), his first album since Transformed Man in 1968, and this time, he somehow enlists Ben Folds, Aimee Mann, Brad Paisley, Henry Rollins and Joe Jackson to help him out. If the thought of Shatner climbing the charts isn't enough, guess who ELSE has committed his vocals to tape? Brace yourselves: Regis Philbin, the hyperactive talk-show host, offers up a batch of standards on When You're Smiling (Hollywood Records)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,sun television critic | March 12, 2007
Mom is a heroin addict fresh out of prison chugging codeine cough syrup in hopes of staving off the shakes. Dad is a con man without a hint of a conscience who gives new meaning to the term "identity thief." And then there are the three children, the youngest of whom is a brilliant 12-year-old boy who draws beautifully, dresses in his sister's clothes and is a world-class pickpocket. Say hello to the new-millennium, all-American family -- prime-time cable television style. In this case, it's the Malloys, of the new FX series The Riches, which premieres tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 25, 2004
Minnie Driver is in a fog -- mentally. The actress-singer is calling from her tour bus in England, where she's promoting her debut, Everything I've Got in My Pocket. The days, the weeks have all been a blur so far. "I'm serious. I really don't know what day it is," she says in her bright British accent. "Wednesday," someone exclaims in the background. "Thank you," Driver shouts back. "That's my keyboard player." The road work has been grueling. But the performer, who plays Rams Head Tavern Saturday night, is excited about the fruition of a lifelong dream: to make music.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,sun television critic | March 12, 2007
Mom is a heroin addict fresh out of prison chugging codeine cough syrup in hopes of staving off the shakes. Dad is a con man without a hint of a conscience who gives new meaning to the term "identity thief." And then there are the three children, the youngest of whom is a brilliant 12-year-old boy who draws beautifully, dresses in his sister's clothes and is a world-class pickpocket. Say hello to the new-millennium, all-American family -- prime-time cable television style. In this case, it's the Malloys, of the new FX series The Riches, which premieres tonight.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 21, 1998
"The Governess" is a very pretty movie. And Minnie Driver is very good in it. Set in 19th-century Britain, it has a fascinating subtext involving the invention of photography.But with all this going for it, "The Governess" is still nothing more than a stilted costume drama, a classy bodice-heaver listing under the weight of its good taste and even better intentions. Part "Jane Eyre," part "The French Lieutenant's Woman," "The Governess" isn't dramatic or original enough to live up to those progenitors or to be of compelling interest.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2004
PICK OF THE WEEK What: An Evening of Poetry with Billy Corgan, in which he will read from his book Blinking With Fists When: Sunday night at 6:30; doors open at 5:30 Where: 9:30 Club, 815 V St. N.W., Washington Why: Because he's proven himself as a lyricist for Smashing Pumpkins and Zwan, so one can hope this will translate into good poetic instincts. (Though this doesn't always prove true. We're looking at you, Jewel.) Admission: $15, available through www.tickets.com or by calling 800-955-5566 Information: www.930.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 3, 2003
Philip Seymour Hoffman paints a fascinating, and perhaps unique, portrait of addiction in Owning Mahowny. Based on a true incident, Mahowny tells the story of a Toronto assistant bank manager whose real full-time job is gambling addict. And the real magic of Hoffman's performance is that he refuses to make Mahowny anything special, or use histrionics to show the depths of his addiction. This may be the quietest addict ever to hit movie screens, as well the most disturbing. We get no background on Mahowny; screenwriter Maurice Chauvet's script is concerned only with the here and now. This is not a portrait of addiction, but rather a snapshot - a few moments in the life of a man who's given over control of his life to a game of chance, and doesn't even realize he's shortchanging himself.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2000
Old-fashioned in the best sense of the word, "Return to Me" is a little heart-warmer of a film that keeps threatening to turn into a trite Hallmark valentine. But some old acting pros in supporting roles, and the sure hand of first-time director Bonnie Hunt, keep it from crossing over into so-cute-I-can't-stand-it territory. Bob Rueland (David Duchovny) is an architect whose latest project is designing a new gorilla house for the zoo where his wife, Elizabeth (Joely Richardson), works.
FEATURES
By Diane Werts and Diane Werts,Newsday | March 12, 2007
The star looks smashing in slinky silk, spike heels and bright-red lipstick. So wait. Who are we talking about? Could be Eddie Izzard. The lead actor of FX's ambitious new family chronicle The Riches has most recently been seen purveying his one-man stand-up shows on BBC America, attired in the sort of miniskirt-and-fishnets styling befitting the world's most famed transvestite comic. Or do we mean the character of his youngest child on The Riches? That would be the one who goes to town when big sister's outfits get handed down.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2006
Movie lovers have four chances this weekend to watch films outdoors. The annual Little Italy Outdoor Film Festival kicks off tonight with director Bonnie Hunt's 2000 Return to Me, starring David Duchovny as a man who strikes up a romance with the woman (Minnie Driver) who received his late wife's heart. Showtime is 9 p.m. at the corner of Stiles and High streets. Admission is free, but bring your own chair and get there early - live music begins at 7 p.m. Information: littleitalymd.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 25, 2004
Minnie Driver is in a fog -- mentally. The actress-singer is calling from her tour bus in England, where she's promoting her debut, Everything I've Got in My Pocket. The days, the weeks have all been a blur so far. "I'm serious. I really don't know what day it is," she says in her bright British accent. "Wednesday," someone exclaims in the background. "Thank you," Driver shouts back. "That's my keyboard player." The road work has been grueling. But the performer, who plays Rams Head Tavern Saturday night, is excited about the fruition of a lifelong dream: to make music.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2004
PICK OF THE WEEK What: An Evening of Poetry with Billy Corgan, in which he will read from his book Blinking With Fists When: Sunday night at 6:30; doors open at 5:30 Where: 9:30 Club, 815 V St. N.W., Washington Why: Because he's proven himself as a lyricist for Smashing Pumpkins and Zwan, so one can hope this will translate into good poetic instincts. (Though this doesn't always prove true. We're looking at you, Jewel.) Admission: $15, available through www.tickets.com or by calling 800-955-5566 Information: www.930.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Eric R. Danton and Eric R. Danton,Hartford Courant | October 14, 2004
Guess who's back with a new album? Yes, R.E.M. But also William Shatner. That's right, Captain Kirk has returned with Has Been (Shout Factory), his first album since Transformed Man in 1968, and this time, he somehow enlists Ben Folds, Aimee Mann, Brad Paisley, Henry Rollins and Joe Jackson to help him out. If the thought of Shatner climbing the charts isn't enough, guess who ELSE has committed his vocals to tape? Brace yourselves: Regis Philbin, the hyperactive talk-show host, offers up a batch of standards on When You're Smiling (Hollywood Records)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 3, 2003
Philip Seymour Hoffman paints a fascinating, and perhaps unique, portrait of addiction in Owning Mahowny. Based on a true incident, Mahowny tells the story of a Toronto assistant bank manager whose real full-time job is gambling addict. And the real magic of Hoffman's performance is that he refuses to make Mahowny anything special, or use histrionics to show the depths of his addiction. This may be the quietest addict ever to hit movie screens, as well the most disturbing. We get no background on Mahowny; screenwriter Maurice Chauvet's script is concerned only with the here and now. This is not a portrait of addiction, but rather a snapshot - a few moments in the life of a man who's given over control of his life to a game of chance, and doesn't even realize he's shortchanging himself.
FEATURES
By Holly Hanson and Holly Hanson,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 1, 1998
NEW YORK -- Mohair sweaters, long gray skirts and Minnie Driver. That's what the first round of fall designer collections in New York had in common.Those fuzzy, scratchy mohair concoctions that were a major theme in Europe are dominating the New York runways. So are skirts that cover much more than the knee. Gray is the most popular color, and Minnie Driver has been seated in every front row. Fortunately, she doesn't seem to mind posing endlessly for the paparazzi.Yet even with these similarities, New York's designers are showing some individuality as the fall shows, which continue through Friday, get under way.Donna Karan offered unusual fabrics and interesting cuts in an innovative collection for DKNY.
NEWS
August 21, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS The spell has ended "Wild" Bill Hagy gave Orioles fans a second show for the price of one when Section 34 was the place to be at Memorial Stadium. Sports baltimoresun.com/connolly An unhealthy problem A computer glitch at CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, the state's largest health insurer, blew Sharon Noble's life into disarray. And she might not be the only one affected. Business baltimoresun.com/consuming OTHER VOICES Jean Marbella on new library -- Maryland Rashod Ollison on R. Kelly's epic -- Today Rick Maese on Michael Vick -- Sports Eileen Ambrose on mortgages -- Business 5 THINGS TO DO TODAY Project Natale jazz show -- Soak up the jazz sounds of Project Natale at the Outdoor Summer Concert Series at Carroll Park, Washington Boulevard and Bayard Street.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2000
Old-fashioned in the best sense of the word, "Return to Me" is a little heart-warmer of a film that keeps threatening to turn into a trite Hallmark valentine. But some old acting pros in supporting roles, and the sure hand of first-time director Bonnie Hunt, keep it from crossing over into so-cute-I-can't-stand-it territory. Bob Rueland (David Duchovny) is an architect whose latest project is designing a new gorilla house for the zoo where his wife, Elizabeth (Joely Richardson), works.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | December 12, 1999
Accessories keep on givingNo idea what to buy that certain someone for the holidays? One word: accessories.The Accessories Council and Harper's Bazaar accessories editor Richard Sinnott offer their suggestions for the 10 best accessories to give this season.And the winners are:* Watches: Look for watches encrusted with jewels and stones, as well as sleek bangle styles.* Rings: The larger the stone, the better.* Scarves: Casual chunky knits and embroidered cashmere.* Gloves: Choose full-length for that favorite ball gown or dressy snowball fight.
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