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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Scrolling through the classical winners of the 2014 Grammys, I was struck by the tilt toward the contemporary, or at least off-the-well-worn-path repertoire. I have no penetrating insight into this. I don't even know if it's a trend in recent years, since I rarely remember who wins and I'm too lazy to go back and look at the archives. But this year's list of winners seems pretty cool. The most old-time, mainstream music to get the nod was in the Best Orchestral Performance category, won by the Minnesota Orchestra for its highly valued recordings on BIS Records of the First Symphony and the much less frequently encountered Fourth Symphony by Sibelius with conductor Osmo Vanska.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Scrolling through the classical winners of the 2014 Grammys, I was struck by the tilt toward the contemporary, or at least off-the-well-worn-path repertoire. I have no penetrating insight into this. I don't even know if it's a trend in recent years, since I rarely remember who wins and I'm too lazy to go back and look at the archives. But this year's list of winners seems pretty cool. The most old-time, mainstream music to get the nod was in the Best Orchestral Performance category, won by the Minnesota Orchestra for its highly valued recordings on BIS Records of the First Symphony and the much less frequently encountered Fourth Symphony by Sibelius with conductor Osmo Vanska.
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 15, 2002
Gustav Mahler knew his time would come. It did, starting in the 1960s, when his psychosis-driven works struck a chord in a world of social, political and musical turmoil. That Mahler's time is still going on says a lot about him - and us. His Symphony No. 3, being presented this weekend by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, combines awe of nature, concern for humanity and reaching for God. It is at once naive and knowing, afraid and sure, schizophrenic and centered. In a great performance, the listener experiences Mahler's emotional journey every step of the way, shudders at the blackness of the funeral march that haunts the first movement, warms to the second's nostalgic glow.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 15, 2002
Gustav Mahler knew his time would come. It did, starting in the 1960s, when his psychosis-driven works struck a chord in a world of social, political and musical turmoil. That Mahler's time is still going on says a lot about him - and us. His Symphony No. 3, being presented this weekend by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, combines awe of nature, concern for humanity and reaching for God. It is at once naive and knowing, afraid and sure, schizophrenic and centered. In a great performance, the listener experiences Mahler's emotional journey every step of the way, shudders at the blackness of the funeral march that haunts the first movement, warms to the second's nostalgic glow.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 18, 2001
The last time the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra traveled to Europe, there were two Germanys, a Soviet Union, lingering Cold War rhetoric and relatively few worries about safety. When the orchestra flies from Baltimore-Washington International Airport on Tuesday for a three-week, 12-city tour of a more unified and peaceful Europe, it will be accompanied by its own security manager for the first time. During a lunch break between rehearsals last week, the musicians received a briefing from that manager, Jeffrey Pursell, a retired security officer with the State Department whose background includes a stint with the U.S. Embassy in Yemen.
FEATURES
By STEPHEN WIGLER | August 2, 1992
Anyone who has ever attended a Baltimore Symphony Orchestra concert would probably recognize Gita Roche. The young cellist has the kind of looks that are hard to miss: luxuriant dark hair, an olive complexion, coal-bright eyes that become saucer-wide with concentration, and a smile that breaks unexpectedly from her serious face.Talented and popular, she deserves the name that her Bombay-born father, a violinist in the Minnesota Orchestra, and her mother, a West Virginia-born soprano, gave her. It is Gita as in the sacred Hindu text, the Bhagavad-Gita -- Song of the Blessed One.The name suggests good fortune, but the 28-year-old Ms. Roche has had cause in recent years to wonder about her luck.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Formant | May 29, 1997
She's been on stage with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Minnesota Orchestra and the London Symphony, but this Sunday, cellist Sharon Robinson will perform a free concert at Har Sinai Congregation in Northwest Baltimore. The cellist, who has accompanied such artists as Rudolf Serkin, Isaac Stern and Yo-Yo Ma, will perform, among other works, Rachmaninoff's Sonata in G minor, Debussy's "Sonata 1915," as well as "With Love," an award-winning composition by Baltimorean Vivian Adelberg Rudow.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | November 11, 1992
Baltimore Symphony's music director, David Zinman, has just been appointed artistic director of the Minnesota Orchestra's Viennese Sommerfest in Minneapolis, one of North America's most important summer music festivals.The 13-year-old festival, which runs annually from mid-July to mid-August, was the model for the much smaller BSO Summerfest, which Mr. Zinman created in Baltimore in 1987.His appointment, which was announced yesterday, means the BSO music director will conduct one of the Minneapolis summer festival's four weeks of concerts in 1993 as artistic director designate and two or more weeks of concerts in 1994, 1995 and 1996, in addition to developing each festival's theme and programming.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 15, 2000
The Annapolis Symphony finds itself keeping some pretty spiffy company these days. The orchestra recently joined the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the symphonies of Seattle, Milwaukee, New Jersey and Albany, Ga., and the American Composers Orchestra of New York as a recipient of a "Music Alive" grant awarded by the American Symphony Orchestra League. "Music Alive" is a composer residency program designed to bring American orchestras and prominent composers together to generate community support for contemporary music.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | August 20, 1992
Arne Running, music director of the Swarthmore College Orchestra and former conductor of the Jenkintown Music School Chamber Orchestra, has been named music director of the Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra.Running, 48, succeeds Karen Deal, the CYSO's founding conductor who recently became the assistant conductor of the Nashville Symphony.About to enter its third season, the CYSO, has quickly become one of the area's major musical organizations. The 60-member orchestra draws young musicians from Anne Arundel County, southern Maryland and the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 18, 2001
The last time the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra traveled to Europe, there were two Germanys, a Soviet Union, lingering Cold War rhetoric and relatively few worries about safety. When the orchestra flies from Baltimore-Washington International Airport on Tuesday for a three-week, 12-city tour of a more unified and peaceful Europe, it will be accompanied by its own security manager for the first time. During a lunch break between rehearsals last week, the musicians received a briefing from that manager, Jeffrey Pursell, a retired security officer with the State Department whose background includes a stint with the U.S. Embassy in Yemen.
FEATURES
By STEPHEN WIGLER | August 2, 1992
Anyone who has ever attended a Baltimore Symphony Orchestra concert would probably recognize Gita Roche. The young cellist has the kind of looks that are hard to miss: luxuriant dark hair, an olive complexion, coal-bright eyes that become saucer-wide with concentration, and a smile that breaks unexpectedly from her serious face.Talented and popular, she deserves the name that her Bombay-born father, a violinist in the Minnesota Orchestra, and her mother, a West Virginia-born soprano, gave her. It is Gita as in the sacred Hindu text, the Bhagavad-Gita -- Song of the Blessed One.The name suggests good fortune, but the 28-year-old Ms. Roche has had cause in recent years to wonder about her luck.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | October 24, 2001
After Sept. 11, members of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra took a hard look at their three-week European visit scheduled to begin Nov. 19. Should the musicians risk traveling abroad during the war on terrorism and its potential backlash against Americans? Yesterday, with only two musicians choosing to stay home, the BSO reconfirmed that the 12-city, $2 million tour is on. "We had a series of meetings where we put out on the table all of our post-Sept. 11 concerns," says Jeffrey Stewart, chairman of the BSO players committee.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 1996
John Adams's two-year-old Violin Concerto made its first local appearance Thursday evening in Meyerhoff Hall in a masterful, thought-provoking performance by soloist Herbert Greenberg and the Baltimore Symphony.This concerto by the composer best known for such operas as "Nixon in China" and "Klinghoffer" already has received a number of performances. This is partly because the original commission was divided among the Minnesota Orchestra, the London Symphony and the New York City Ballet.This is fearsome music for any violinist.
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