Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMinistry
IN THE NEWS

Ministry

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2011
A priest who once worked at Loyola University Maryland has been removed from his ministry duties in Pennsylvania after allegations of inappropriate sexual contact with two minors surfaced. According to the Maryland Province of the Society of Jesus, the Rev. Louis Bonacci was involved in touching a minor at a Howard County residence while working as Loyola's assistant director of ministry from 1978 to 1982. He left there to become the Catholic campus minister at Wake Forest University in North Carolina, and subsequently held similar positions at three other colleges.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Tony Glaros | April 8, 2014
Inside the hushed contours of the racetrack kitchen, deep in the cloistered, hardscrabble world of the backstretch at Laurel Park racetrack, every head was bowed. The Rev. Segundo Mir, who pastors a mostly Spanish-speaking flock at First Baptist Church of Laurel, led the 14 people in the room in prayer. "Thank you, Lord, for this beautiful day, the blue sky," he began in a honey-thick baritone. The Monday evening assembly is a long tradition, a standing invitation for anyone who works at the track and is moved to attend.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 2, 2003
Cooperative ministry seeking artists for fair Columbia Cooperative Ministry seeks artisans to show and sell their work at its craft fair, scheduled from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 15 at Wilde Lake Interfaith Center, 10421 Twin Rivers Road, Columbia. The cost is $35 for a space with a table. Proceeds will go to Heifer Project International, a program to supply farm animals to low-income rural families. Information: George Martin, 410-730-7862.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 4, 2014
Given all the excitement his papacy has generated, the approach of the first full Lenten season under Pope Francis resonates particularly with Catholics - even fallen-off Catholics - who prefer to see faith as social activism and not as Sunday pageant. Since he became pope last March, Francis has repeatedly called for a church of service and justice, and not one that is insular and obsessed with doctrine. His calling out of corrupt financial systems that foster economic disparity has been ringing bells around the world, and not only among Catholics.
NEWS
January 15, 1992
A new Sakhisizwe Christian Ministries of South Africa has been started here by Don Bixler, formerly director of development for HampsteadYouth for Christ.Bixler and his wife, Judy, were former missionaries with youth for Christ in South Africa in 1990, where they developed a love for the poor people of the black townships.In February 1990, Sakhisizwe Christian Ministries of Kwazakhele (a township near Port Elizabeth) was formed by Sicelo Duze, former executive director with Youth for Christ in Port Elizabeth and the Bixlers' boss.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | December 25, 1994
The dining hall in the 360-bed Lorien Nursing & Rehabilitation Center in Columbia was turned into a mini "Muppet Show" last week, but this production showcased religious messages.Instead of Kermit the Frog and Miss Piggy, there were bouncing puppets of mice, a girl and a gray-haired grandmother who presented the "Church Mouse Christmas" story.They sang and discussed Jesus Christ's birth.L "He's the reason why the season is fun," Grammy puppet said.When the young puppeteers of the Good News Puppet Company sang from the three-tier stage, the seniors waved, clapped and tapped along.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2001
Mary Louise Shelley, a retired secretary who was part of her husband's ministry to alcoholics, died Monday of a heart attack at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 79 and had lived in Timonium since 1998, after four decades in Baltimore's Charles Village and Remington neighborhoods. The wife of Father Harry E. Shelley, an Episcopal priest who died Aug. 30, she had worked with him in his ministries to alcoholics and hospice patients at the Church of the Guardian Angel in Remington, St. Michael & All Angels in Charles Village and Mount Calvary Episcopal Church in downtown Baltimore, where she remained a communicant.
NEWS
By Karen Keys and Karen Keys,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2000
As the Rev. Walter Smith makes his way through the Howard County Detention Center today, Good Friday, he will give each of the 200-plus inmates an Easter card marked "Dear Friend." The cards will contain hand-written words of encouragement, such as, "People are thinking about you," and inspirational Scripture verses. Smith is a part-time chaplain with the Christian Jail Ministry, a local organization that solicited Easter cards from the community to be handed out to inmates. Most cards filtered in as singles, but occasionally an individual would send three or four cards in one envelope.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1995
A group of local ministers and lay people will sell Christmas trees to raise money to feed the hungry abroad.The Columbia Cooperative Ministry, 15 congregations working together in ministry, will sell the Christmas trees today through Monday at the Wilde Lake Interfaith Center. Twenty-five percent of the money raised will go to support the Heifer Project International, an interdenominational organization that feeds more than 1 million families worldwide.The anti-hunger organization, which celebrated its 50th anniversary last year, supplies animals and agricultural materials to help the poor become self-sufficient for food and income.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Staff writer | December 5, 1990
WESTMINSTER - The Shepherd's Staff, a cooperative ministry of Westminster area churches, will try to keep the wolves away from the door of the needy and those suffering a crisis in their lives, beginning next year.The group will join other social ministry outlets around the county, such as the Northeast Social Action Program in Manchester/Hampstead, Caring and Sharing in Taneytown and the Enabling Social and Church Advocacy for People Enrichment program in Sykesville."There's really a pressing need in the community, so we said, 'Let's not drag our feet,' and our goal is to have it off the ground by January," said the Rev. Chris A. Wood of Westminster United Methodist Church.
NEWS
November 23, 2013
Looks like the French may not be flocking to Charm City any time soon. Seems Baltimore's not really a safe destination, at least as far as the French foreign ministry is concerned. Just as our state department warns about Americans traveling to certain places (it suggests avoiding North Korea, for example), the French are urged to exercise caution in certain U.S. locales. And what do the French say about Baltimore? "Considered a dangerous city except Downtown. " But don't feel too bad; few American cities fared much better.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
Instead of a traditional Halloween haunted house filled with fog and ghoulish scenes, an outreach ministry in East Baltimore is offering stark glimpses into real-life issues, messages of hope and firm promises of help. The images portrayed at Reality House can be as haunting as any in a tale of horror, mostly because they are based on actual situations. Within a 46-foot-long tent pitched behind the Patterson Park Library, visitors can check out scenes that depict social ills like drug addiction, suicide and teen pregnancy.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
Carolyn P.G. King, the state director of Children's Bible Ministries of Maryland, died of a stroke Oct. 6 at her Elkridge home. She was 73. Born Carolyn Patricia Grace Byers in Front Royal, Va., she was the daughter of an Army instructor who also sold fabrics and sewing machines. Her mother was a homemaker. Mrs. King attended Dundalk High School. She was a 1980 graduate from the Baltimore School of the Bible. She became active in Catonsville Baptist Church and had been a member of the Faith Bible Church in Elkridge for the past 35 years.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley, who continues to campaign for same-sex marriage in advance of a likely referendum aimed at overturning the law he signed this month, will speak Friday at a conference in Baltimore for gay and lesbian Catholics. Also scheduled to appear at the conference organized by the Maryland-based New Ways Ministry are Barbara Johnson, who was denied Communion at her mother's funeral Mass in Gaithersburg last month because she is a lesbian; former Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, who has written a book critical of church involvement in politics; and Geoffery Robinson, a retired Catholic bishop from Australia.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2012
The Rev. James J. McNamee III, a retired Episcopal priest who had pastored St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Annapolis, died Friday of cancer at his home in the Ambassador Apartments in Tuscany-Canterbury. He was 76. Mr. McNamee was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. "His father was killed during World War II and his mother managed apartment houses," said Dr. John W. Payne, Richey Hospice medical director and a boyhood friend. After graduating from City College in 1953, he studied at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service for two years and spent his junior year abroad at the Sorbonne in Paris.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2012
As violent protests continued in Afghanistan over the burning of copies of the Muslim holy book by NATO forces, the Pentagon confirmed Monday that a Maryland National Guard major was one of two U.S. military officers shot to death inside a ministry building in the heart of the Afghan capital over the weekend. Maj. Robert J. Marchanti II, 48, a longtime physical-education teacher in the Baltimore County public schools, had been working since September as a mentor to the Afghan National Police, part of the NATO partnering mission at the center of U.S. strategy in the country.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1999
Harry Brunett is not your typical Episcopal priest.Ordained in the early 1960s, he served as a priest in Baltimore County for only four years before deciding the church was too removed from the issues of the day: civil rights, women's rights, the Vietnam War. He quit to become a community activist, then a Rouse Co. employee, then a consultant, then a retirement home director, before once again -- seven years ago, in his mid-50s -- hearing a call to become...
NEWS
By KATHY SUTPHIN | August 26, 1994
Faith and volunteer spirit shown by workers at St. James Thrift Shop for the past 20 years have moved mountains of usable clothing and household items to benefit people in need, here and abroad.The shop, an outreach ministry of St. James Episcopal Church, is at 3 S. Main St. in Mount Airy. Shelves at the shop hold clothing for men, women and children, as well as household goods and baby items.Furniture and other goods also attract bargain shoppers. It is open to the public from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays.
SPORTS
By David Dorsey, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
Just one year in age separated 17-year-old Travis Wood from the oldest of the Kenyan boys he was standing before, but at 6 feet 2, 190 pounds, he appeared like a giant to them. So too did 5-10, 175-pound 16-year-old Keifer Rawlings. The two linebackers from the St. Paul's football team were in Kenya in early January as part of a Fellowship of Christian Athletes mission trip. Sharing their faith and the sport of football, Wood and Rawlings coached the Kenyan boys for five days, helping them progress from knowing hardly anything about the sport - many of them play soccer - to participating in a scrimmage wearing helmets and shoulder pads.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2012
The Archdiocese of Baltimore has launched its own investigation into a Towson priest arrested this month on charges of indecent exposure at an adult store. Mark Stewart Bullock, 47, is scheduled for a March 6 court appearance in District Court in Harford County on misdemeanor charges that carry a maximum fine of $1,000 and three years in prison. Church officials have removed "all his faculties to function as a priest," said Sean Caine, archdiocese spokesman. "The archdiocese is doing its own investigation and will be speaking to anyone who might help us understand what is happening in his life," Caine said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.