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Minister John Major

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NEWS
April 9, 1995
President Clinton and Britain's Prime Minister John Major have a special relationship.Mr. Major sent Conservative Party ad men to help Republicans craft a smear campaign against candidate Clinton in 1992. Then Mr. Clinton undermined Mr. Major's conduct of relations with terrorists of the IRA so as to alienate Northern Ireland's majority .. from anything that emerged.Such meddling in the other's affairs is unusual if not unparalleled ,,TC among friendly nations.Now Mr. Major has visited the White House so that the two could declare their differences over and emphasize their agreements.
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NEWS
By Stephen Manes and Stephen Manes,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 21, 1997
STOCKTON-ON-TEES, England -- His Conservative Party is imploding. The polls are alarming. And the photo opportunity of the year is threatening to fall apart because somebody forgot to move the campaign bus.But British Prime Minister John Major doesn't lose his cool -- or his smile. Walking down the road with his political benefactor, former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, he follows the orders of cameramen shrieking: "Stop! Get that bus out of the way!" Major turns around. The bus leaves.
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NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 17, 1997
LONDON -- The way British Prime Minister John Major apparently sees it, television and time are on his side in his battle to wipe away a wide poll deficit and win re-election against the Labor Party and its leader, Tony Blair.Major appears willing to accept Blair's challenge to engage in a TV debate during the general election campaign that will culminate with a polling day, expected to be held May 1. While such debates are common in the United States, they are extraordinary in Britain, where leaders of the major parties briefly square off twice a week during Prime Minister's Question Time.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 21, 1997
STOCKTON-ON-TEES, England -- His Conservative Party is imploding. The polls are alarming. And the photo opportunity of the year is threatening to fall apart because somebody forgot to move the campaign bus.But British Prime Minister John Major doesn't lose his cool -- or his smile. Walking down the road with his political benefactor, former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, he follows the orders of cameramen shrieking: "Stop! Get that bus out of the way!" Major turns around. The bus leaves.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 25, 1994
LONDON -- Playing a high-stakes game to try to whip his own back-bench critics into line, Prime Minister John Major said yesterday that his Conservative government would resign and would call a new election if it failed to win a parliamentary vote Monday on payments to the European Union.The move was intended to overcome a rebellion by so-called Euro-skeptics in the party, those who are fighting to prevent Britain from merging into Europe, as called for by the Maastricht Treaty on European Union.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | June 14, 1995
LONDON -- Britain's Iron Lady is back in the arena and she still packs a punch.Last night, Margaret Thatcher showed up at Westminster City Hall, to perform before 2,000 true believers. She talked about her personal and political roots. She jousted with questioners. She launched into current issues from Bosnia to Britain's role in Europe.It was just like old times, only she's no longer Britain's boss."The policies that gave Britain back her pride and standing in the world are the policies we must pursue," she said to cheers.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau | January 18, 1994
LONDON -- Prime Minister John Major is in danger of becoming the Stan Laurel of screwball politics, dodging perpetual crises with an air of deadpan earnestness.The question many now ask is whether he can escape unscathed until the last reel. He is seen as a nice guy who may finish last because he's often in over his head. His government, besieged by sex and financial scandals and stuck with a slogan about going back to moral basics, is being talked about in terms of baggy-pants farce.Britons told Gallup pollsters that in a parliamentary pantomime they would cast Mr. Major as a pet such as Mother Goose or Dick Whittington's cat, or a knock-about comic like Idle Jack or Simple Simon.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 25, 1996
LONDON -- British Prime Minister John Major offered Northern Ireland paramilitaries a choice yesterday -- give up their bullets or face a ballot.Mr. Major proposed holding elections in Northern Ireland as a way to jump-start the peace process if paramilitary groups -- Catholic and Protestant alike -- continue to refuse to hand over their weapons ahead of all-party peace talks. But many say the proposal is another British roadblock to peace and a way to stymie the aspirations of the Irish Republican Army.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | June 23, 1995
LONDON -- Ladies and gentlemen, start your political campaigns -- if you dare.That was the message British Prime Minister John Major delivered yesterday when he quit as Conservative Party leader and challenged his right-wing critics to "put up or shut up" in a leadership fight.Mr. Major, whose party is at an all-time low in opinion polls, will continue as prime minister, at least pending results of the July 4 leadership election.Yesterday's terse announcement in the garden of his Downing Street home stunned his opponents and electrified his supporters.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | April 10, 1992
LONDON -- In a stunning ending to the closest-fought general election here in years, Britain's voters poured out in large numbers yesterday and gave Prime Minister John Major a mandate to govern the country for the next five years.It was a remarkable come-from-behind performance by the mild man from London's rough Brixton neighborhood, especially because the country is in the midst of the longest recession since the 1930s and discontent with the government's handling of the economy is widespread.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 17, 1997
LONDON -- The way British Prime Minister John Major apparently sees it, television and time are on his side in his battle to wipe away a wide poll deficit and win re-election against the Labor Party and its leader, Tony Blair.Major appears willing to accept Blair's challenge to engage in a TV debate during the general election campaign that will culminate with a polling day, expected to be held May 1. While such debates are common in the United States, they are extraordinary in Britain, where leaders of the major parties briefly square off twice a week during Prime Minister's Question Time.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 25, 1996
LONDON -- British Prime Minister John Major offered Northern Ireland paramilitaries a choice yesterday -- give up their bullets or face a ballot.Mr. Major proposed holding elections in Northern Ireland as a way to jump-start the peace process if paramilitary groups -- Catholic and Protestant alike -- continue to refuse to hand over their weapons ahead of all-party peace talks. But many say the proposal is another British roadblock to peace and a way to stymie the aspirations of the Irish Republican Army.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | June 23, 1995
LONDON -- Ladies and gentlemen, start your political campaigns -- if you dare.That was the message British Prime Minister John Major delivered yesterday when he quit as Conservative Party leader and challenged his right-wing critics to "put up or shut up" in a leadership fight.Mr. Major, whose party is at an all-time low in opinion polls, will continue as prime minister, at least pending results of the July 4 leadership election.Yesterday's terse announcement in the garden of his Downing Street home stunned his opponents and electrified his supporters.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | June 14, 1995
LONDON -- Britain's Iron Lady is back in the arena and she still packs a punch.Last night, Margaret Thatcher showed up at Westminster City Hall, to perform before 2,000 true believers. She talked about her personal and political roots. She jousted with questioners. She launched into current issues from Bosnia to Britain's role in Europe.It was just like old times, only she's no longer Britain's boss."The policies that gave Britain back her pride and standing in the world are the policies we must pursue," she said to cheers.
NEWS
April 9, 1995
President Clinton and Britain's Prime Minister John Major have a special relationship.Mr. Major sent Conservative Party ad men to help Republicans craft a smear campaign against candidate Clinton in 1992. Then Mr. Clinton undermined Mr. Major's conduct of relations with terrorists of the IRA so as to alienate Northern Ireland's majority .. from anything that emerged.Such meddling in the other's affairs is unusual if not unparalleled ,,TC among friendly nations.Now Mr. Major has visited the White House so that the two could declare their differences over and emphasize their agreements.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 25, 1994
LONDON -- Playing a high-stakes game to try to whip his own back-bench critics into line, Prime Minister John Major said yesterday that his Conservative government would resign and would call a new election if it failed to win a parliamentary vote Monday on payments to the European Union.The move was intended to overcome a rebellion by so-called Euro-skeptics in the party, those who are fighting to prevent Britain from merging into Europe, as called for by the Maastricht Treaty on European Union.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 21, 1997
STOCKTON-ON-TEES, England -- His Conservative Party is imploding. The polls are alarming. And the photo opportunity of the year is threatening to fall apart because somebody forgot to move the campaign bus.But British Prime Minister John Major doesn't lose his cool -- or his smile. Walking down the road with his political benefactor, former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, he follows the orders of cameramen shrieking: "Stop! Get that bus out of the way!" Major turns around. The bus leaves.
NEWS
By Stephen Manes and Stephen Manes,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 21, 1997
STOCKTON-ON-TEES, England -- His Conservative Party is imploding. The polls are alarming. And the photo opportunity of the year is threatening to fall apart because somebody forgot to move the campaign bus.But British Prime Minister John Major doesn't lose his cool -- or his smile. Walking down the road with his political benefactor, former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, he follows the orders of cameramen shrieking: "Stop! Get that bus out of the way!" Major turns around. The bus leaves.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau | January 18, 1994
LONDON -- Prime Minister John Major is in danger of becoming the Stan Laurel of screwball politics, dodging perpetual crises with an air of deadpan earnestness.The question many now ask is whether he can escape unscathed until the last reel. He is seen as a nice guy who may finish last because he's often in over his head. His government, besieged by sex and financial scandals and stuck with a slogan about going back to moral basics, is being talked about in terms of baggy-pants farce.Britons told Gallup pollsters that in a parliamentary pantomime they would cast Mr. Major as a pet such as Mother Goose or Dick Whittington's cat, or a knock-about comic like Idle Jack or Simple Simon.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | April 10, 1992
LONDON -- In a stunning ending to the closest-fought general election here in years, Britain's voters poured out in large numbers yesterday and gave Prime Minister John Major a mandate to govern the country for the next five years.It was a remarkable come-from-behind performance by the mild man from London's rough Brixton neighborhood, especially because the country is in the midst of the longest recession since the 1930s and discontent with the government's handling of the economy is widespread.
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