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By New York Times News Service | March 5, 1994
Many black Americans reject the notion that Louis Farrakhan and the Nation of Islam represent the views of most blacks in the country, yet many seem to share at least some of the racial views associated with the group, according to the latest New York Times poll.At the same time, a preponderance of blacks say more leaders, both black and white, should publicly criticize racist statements when made by either blacks or whites.The 60 percent of blacks polled who have heard about Minister Farrakhan are closely split in their opinions about him personally, with about as many expressing a favorable view (22 percent)
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NEWS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2000
Mark Hughes was a sixth-grade teacher at Lombard Middle School in 1995, watching the Million Man March on CNN with his pupils. Hughes resolved that if a similar event were to happen, he would be there in person. On Monday, he will get his chance. The Million Family March, which Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan and other organizers have said will be a more inclusive successor to the Million Man March, will take place on the National Mall amid busloads of visitors (local organizers estimate 250,000 will travel from Baltimore)
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NEWS
By Dan Berger | October 16, 1995
If you do not accept the leadership of Minister Farrakhan and Reverend Chavis, you are not marching in Washington today. If you are, you did.Newt realizes that the General could derail his program. The next level of awareness will be reached when he acknowledges that's why people like the General.Baltimore City reached agreement with the ACLU about housing the poor, which is not the same as agreement with Baltimore County, or with the poor.
NEWS
By JAMES BOCK and JAMES BOCK,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The biggest gathering of black Americans ever joined Louis Farrakhan at the Million Man March yesterday in an emotional pledge to strive for self-improvement and to forswear drugs and violence.More than 400,000 people, nearly all black men, converged on the U.S. Capitol, according to U.S. Park Police estimates, for a day that was more spiritual revival than political demonstration. Organizers claimed that up to 2 million attended.It was an unprecedented outpouring of black pride and a major achievement for Minister Farrakhan, who has growing influence among black Americans despite a record of anti-Jewish, anti-white rhetoric.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | June 16, 1994
Standing before the cameras at the Baltimore black leadership summit, NAACP Director Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. and Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan were a portrait of two men trying hard to expand their followings in black America.Dr. Chavis, 46, as leader of a traditionally integrationist organization, took a major risk by inviting Minister Farrakhan, a fiery black separatist with a history of anti-Jewish remarks, to the three-day summit.The NAACP executive director gambled that by defiantly sitting down with Minister Farrakhan, 61, the nation's largest civil rights group would gain black support, especially from youth, that would make up for any loss of white allies and money.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1995
They are the odd couple for real, knotted together by mutual need.When the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. was in a hole, Louis Farrakhan threw him a rope. The rope is the Million Man March, the campaign to bring that many black men to Washington a week from today to show their commitment to their families and to the African-American community.The idea was Minister Farrakhan's. Dr. Chavis signed on to organize the event. As for the hole, Dr. Chavis had dug it by getting fired as executive director of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in August 1994, after allegations of sexual impropriety and misuse of the organization's funds.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | May 5, 1994
The NAACP is expected to announce today that it will hold a national summit of black leaders -- probably including black separatist Louis Farrakhan -- in Baltimore next month.The Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., the Baltimore-based civil rights group's executive director, said yesterday that a "broad array of African-American leaders" would be invited to the 2 1/2 -day meeting on themes such as economics, education and violence.Dr. Chavis would not say whether Minister Farrakhan would be on the list of participants, but he did say that black leaders with national constituencies would be invited.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 13, 1995
When Malcolm X was assassinated nearly 30 years ago in a Harlem ballroom, his 4 1/2 -year-old daughter, Qubilah Bahiyah Shabazz, was there and watched her father die in a hail of gunfire.Yesterday, Ms. Shabazz, 34, was arrested in Minneapolis on federal charges of trying to hire a hit man to kill her father's Muslim disciple turned bitter rival, Louis Farrakhan, minister of the Nation of Islam and a man her mother believes to have been involved in Malcolm X's murder."This is an extraordinary case," David L. Lillehaug, the U.S. attorney for the District of Minnesota, said in announcing the arrest and indictment of Ms. Shabazz.
NEWS
By JAMES BOCK and JAMES BOCK,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Elaine Tassy contributed to this article | October 6, 1995
The Million Man March, Louis Farrakhan's plan for a huge rally on Washington's Mall to show America "a vastly different picture of the black male," has grown into an event with support from well beyond the black separatist leader's circle.Mainstream leaders such as the Congressional Black Caucus, the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson and Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke have endorsed the Oct. 16 march. Organizing efforts across the nation are rooted in black churches as well as Minister Farrakhan's Nation of Islam.
NEWS
By JAMES BOCK and JAMES BOCK,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The biggest gathering of black Americans ever joined Louis Farrakhan at the Million Man March yesterday in an emotional pledge to strive for self-improvement and to forswear drugs and violence.More than 400,000 people, nearly all black men, converged on the U.S. Capitol, according to U.S. Park Police estimates, for a day that was more spiritual revival than political demonstration. Organizers claimed that up to 2 million attended.It was an unprecedented outpouring of black pride and a major achievement for Minister Farrakhan, who has growing influence among black Americans despite a record of anti-Jewish, anti-white rhetoric.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | October 16, 1995
If you do not accept the leadership of Minister Farrakhan and Reverend Chavis, you are not marching in Washington today. If you are, you did.Newt realizes that the General could derail his program. The next level of awareness will be reached when he acknowledges that's why people like the General.Baltimore City reached agreement with the ACLU about housing the poor, which is not the same as agreement with Baltimore County, or with the poor.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1995
They are the odd couple for real, knotted together by mutual need.When the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. was in a hole, Louis Farrakhan threw him a rope. The rope is the Million Man March, the campaign to bring that many black men to Washington a week from today to show their commitment to their families and to the African-American community.The idea was Minister Farrakhan's. Dr. Chavis signed on to organize the event. As for the hole, Dr. Chavis had dug it by getting fired as executive director of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in August 1994, after allegations of sexual impropriety and misuse of the organization's funds.
NEWS
By JAMES BOCK and JAMES BOCK,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Elaine Tassy contributed to this article | October 6, 1995
The Million Man March, Louis Farrakhan's plan for a huge rally on Washington's Mall to show America "a vastly different picture of the black male," has grown into an event with support from well beyond the black separatist leader's circle.Mainstream leaders such as the Congressional Black Caucus, the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson and Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke have endorsed the Oct. 16 march. Organizing efforts across the nation are rooted in black churches as well as Minister Farrakhan's Nation of Islam.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 13, 1995
When Malcolm X was assassinated nearly 30 years ago in a Harlem ballroom, his 4 1/2 -year-old daughter, Qubilah Bahiyah Shabazz, was there and watched her father die in a hail of gunfire.Yesterday, Ms. Shabazz, 34, was arrested in Minneapolis on federal charges of trying to hire a hit man to kill her father's Muslim disciple turned bitter rival, Louis Farrakhan, minister of the Nation of Islam and a man her mother believes to have been involved in Malcolm X's murder."This is an extraordinary case," David L. Lillehaug, the U.S. attorney for the District of Minnesota, said in announcing the arrest and indictment of Ms. Shabazz.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | June 16, 1994
Standing before the cameras at the Baltimore black leadership summit, NAACP Director Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. and Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan were a portrait of two men trying hard to expand their followings in black America.Dr. Chavis, 46, as leader of a traditionally integrationist organization, took a major risk by inviting Minister Farrakhan, a fiery black separatist with a history of anti-Jewish remarks, to the three-day summit.The NAACP executive director gambled that by defiantly sitting down with Minister Farrakhan, 61, the nation's largest civil rights group would gain black support, especially from youth, that would make up for any loss of white allies and money.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | June 13, 1994
A boisterous group of 60 people, marching and waving picket signs, voiced its opposition yesterday to the NAACP for inviting Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan to its summit of African-American community leaders.Spurred on by Jewish activists and a former NAACP assistant director, the crowd chanted slogans, including "Don't embrace the racist; Farrakhan is a racist," outside the headquarters of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People."You should not legitimate Jewish racists and you should not legitimate black racists," Michael Lerner, editor of Tikkun, a progressive Jewish magazine, told the group.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | February 20, 1994
NEW YORK -- Despite pressure to distance itself from black separatist Louis Farrakhan, the NAACP said yesterday that it is moving ahead to sponsor a black leadership summit this spring including the Nation of Islam leader.The Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., NAACP executive director, said that Minister Farrakhan and Rep. Kweisi Mfume, the Baltimore Democrat who heads the Congressional Black Caucus, had confirmed they would attend the summit. No date or place has been set.Among major black leaders, only the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson, who was Dr. Chavis' main rival last year for the NAACP job, has not yet said he would attend, although Dr. Chavis said he has been invited.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | June 13, 1994
A boisterous group of 60 people, marching and waving picket signs, voiced its opposition yesterday to the NAACP for inviting Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan to its summit of African-American community leaders.Spurred on by Jewish activists and a former NAACP assistant director, the crowd chanted slogans, including "Don't embrace the racist; Farrakhan is a racist," outside the headquarters of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People."You should not legitimate Jewish racists and you should not legitimate black racists," Michael Lerner, editor of Tikkun, a progressive Jewish magazine, told the group.
NEWS
By Jack Greenberg | May 24, 1994
AS THE director-counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund from 1961 to 1984, I am often asked why the NAACP has wooed Minister Louis Farrakhan, Prof. Leonard Jeffries and the rapper Sister Souljah.One apparent explanation is that because of its success the NAACP -- which is separate from the Defense Fund -- has yielded its central, mainstream role in the black community to black elected officials. They are now the community's legitimate representatives.The organization is thus trying to renew itself by overtures to other seemingly ascendant leadership forces.
NEWS
By Garland L. Thompson | May 24, 1994
Washington -- BLACK leadership summits make many white Americans uncomfortable -- and none more so than when blacks whom they call "responsible" leaders try for detente with their brasher counterparts.Witness the flurry of white comments on the Black Caucus Weekend rapprochement between Rep. Kweisi Mfume, D-Md., leader of the Congressional Black Caucus, Benjamin Chavis of the NAACP and Louis Farrakhan of the Nation of Islam.Not to worry, said the nervous-sounding analysts. Everybody knows Louis Farrakhan is irresponsible.
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