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Minister Benjamin Netanyahu

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By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 24, 1997
DAMASCUS, Syria -- In the Old City market, where the eyes of the president gaze down from huge murals and where the ears of the president's spies are always near, no one whispers anymore of Israel and peace.Now the Syrians talk quietly of Iran and Iraq, the untrustworthy Americans, and a lost opportunity for peace."We no longer believe that we'll make peace with Disneyland," said a young man who gave his name as Aladdin, and who used Disneyland as a code word for Israel."We no longer say anything about peace.
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NEWS
June 17, 2009
Will Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's announcement that he accepts the idea of a Palestinian state help move the Middle East toward peace? Yes 25% No 63% Not sure 12% (295 votes, results not scientific) Next poll: : Is the Baltimore Police Department doing a good job of responding to increased reports of criminal activity in and around the Inner Harbor? Vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
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NEWS
June 17, 2009
Will Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's announcement that he accepts the idea of a Palestinian state help move the Middle East toward peace? Yes 25% No 63% Not sure 12% (295 votes, results not scientific) Next poll: : Is the Baltimore Police Department doing a good job of responding to increased reports of criminal activity in and around the Inner Harbor? Vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
NEWS
June 16, 2009
Progress in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict tends to be painfully incremental. But marginal progress is better than none at all, which is why Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's announcement Sunday that he is willing to accept a Palestinian state is a welcome development - even if it doesn't go nearly far enough. With Mr. Netanyahu's speech, a milestone has been reached. From this day forward, there can no longer be any serious debate about whether a Palestinian state will (or should)
NEWS
February 4, 2000
Sister Madonna Kolbenschlag, 64, an author and former House of Representatives policy analyst, died Saturday of a stroke in Santiago, Chile. She was 64. She taught American studies and women's studies at the University of Notre Dame in the 1980s, and was a legislative aide and research consultant in the U.S. House. She also was involved in human rights investigations in Central America. Thomas Joseph Peterson, 102, the oldest member of the Nez Perce tribe, died Sunday in Tacoma, Wash.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 15, 1996
JERUSALEM -- As peace talks snagged over Israel's expected turnover of Hebron to Palestinian self-rule, opposition to the move within Israel turned nasty yesterday, with right-wing extremists threatening Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.A year after Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin was assassinated for handing over to Arabs lands considered by some Israelis to have been given by God to the Jews in the Bible, graffiti started appearing on Jerusalem walls with new threats by extremist groups such as Kach.
NEWS
October 10, 1996
ISRAEL'S PRIME MINISTER Benjamin Netanyahu needs to ponder the implications of his efforts to rewrite the Oslo peace accords signed by his predecessors, Yitzhak Rabin and Shimon Peres. For if any government takes it upon itself to renege on past solemn commitments, how can it hope that other nations will be willing henceforth to negotiate in good faith?Mr. Netanyahu's greater obligation is, of course, the safety and security of his people. If he believes the agreements should be formally renounced, he should say so -- and do it. Instead, he declares his allegiance to the Oslo accords and then demands "adjustments" or takes actions that are inflammatory to the Palestinians and detrimental to the authority of their leader, Yasser Arafat.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 26, 1998
JERUSALEM -- Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is ready to bring his former foreign minister, David Levy, back into his Cabinet in an effort to shore up his disintegrating coalition and to increase his chances of re-election or assembling a unity government.Levy, a political moderate who resigned in January after denouncing the Netanyahu administration as aimless, said yesterday that he would return, though the terms are still under negotiation.A veteran of Israeli politics, Levy has been offered either the Finance Ministry or the National Infrastructures Ministry, a place in the inner circle, a role in the "final-status" talks with the Palestinians and a chance to lead future negotiations with Syria.
NEWS
July 21, 1996
THE POSSIBILITY of peace between Israel under a Likud Party government and its neighbors improved with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's visit to Cairo. This was orchestrated with other positive gestures toward Arab neighbors.The closure of the border with the Palestinian Authority, imposed before the election by former Prime Minister Shimon Peres in response to terrorism, will be lifted to allow 10,000 more workers to enter Israel daily, as well as more truck and taxi and ambulance traffic.
NEWS
June 17, 1997
ISRAEL'S HIGH COURT clarified the political crisis facing Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu by absolving him from any legal problem. It confirmed the judgment of the attorney general that Mr. Netanyahu and his justice minister should not be indicted in a political scandal.They had picked an unqualified attorney general (he didn't last) who allegedly was to bargain away a charge of corruption against the leader of a small political party, whose support Mr. Netanyahu's coalition needs.Americans know the debilitating effect of endless litigation on government.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 8, 2005
JERUSALEM -- Days before Israel is set to begin moving thousands of settlers from the Gaza Strip, Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's chief political rival, Finance Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, resigned yesterday to protest the withdrawal plan, saying the government was acting with "complete blindness." His resignation is unlikely to disrupt the withdrawal that is scheduled to begin Aug. 15. But it underscores the dissension Sharon's plan has created among hawkish members of the Cabinet, including many in Sharon's Likud Party.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 4, 2005
JERUSALEM - Israel's Cabinet soundly defeated an attempt yesterday to delay the planned withdrawal from the Gaza Strip by three months. The 18-3 decision was the first of two planned votes this week on proposals to postpone the pullout, scheduled to start next month. The parliament, or Knesset, is expected to defeat Wednesday a separate measure seeking a delay. The proposals stoked fresh tensions between Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and his main political foe, Finance Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who joined two other rightist ministers yesterday in backing the proposed delay.
NEWS
December 15, 2000
YASSER Arafat has one last chance to accept the deal offered by Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak at Camp David, in July, including a slice of Jerusalem. Doing so would restore the Palestinian economy to promise, from the despair to which it was plunged by Israel's response to the Palestinian uprising. By calling an election for February, Mr. Barak is not giving Mr. Arafat much time. But then, Mr. Arafat had all the time he needed and used it to trigger the Palestinian uprising he may not now be able to rein in. A majority of Israelis want peace along the lines Mr. Barak offered.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 10, 2000
JERUSALEM - Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak, in a new throw of the dice to retain power, announced last night that he would resign and compete in automatic elections for the prime minister's job in 60 days. Barak's move apparently was intended to block a political comeback by former Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who polls indicate would trounce Barak in a two-way contest. Under Israeli law, only a sitting member of parliament can run if a prime minister resigns. Netanyahu gave up his seat last year.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 25, 2000
JERUSALEM - One man championed peace with the Arabs and offered more than any of his recent predecessors to get it. The other's name is linked inextricably with one of the most brutal acts against Arab civilians in two decades. Now Ehud Barak and Ariel Sharon need each other, and their romance of convenience is putting the Middle East on edge. Against a backdrop of continuing bloodshed in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, both former generals, Prime Minister Barak and Sharon, hard-line leader of the opposition Likud party, are locked in negotiations to team up in a government of "national emergency" that many see as the final nail in the coffin for the peace process between Israel and the Palestinians.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 28, 2000
JERUSALEM - Sixteen months after being soundly voted out of power, former Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu appears about to rise from the ashes of scandal and stage a political comeback. Netanyahu cleared the biggest hurdle in his return to the political stage last night, when Israel's attorney general announced that he would not indict the former Likud leader or his wife on corruption charges. Attorney General Eliakim Rubinstein did not let Netanyahu off gently. While saying there was not sufficient evidence to convict Netanyahu, he criticized what he called a "depressing picture of conduct."
NEWS
August 30, 1996
IT IS TIME for Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel to meet Yasser Arafat, the president of the Palestinian Authority, to begin a relationship that can in time complete the peace process spelled out in the Oslo accord. Israel-Palestinian relations are worsening, punctuated by the Palestinian general strike yesterday called by Mr. Arafat to protest expansion of Israeli settlements and stalled negotiations. Mr. Netanyahu's campaign promise of peace with security implies engaging the elected leader of 2 million Palestinian neighbors, not humiliating him.The best indications are that even many Israeli hawks who helped put Mr. Netanyahu in office want him to talk to Mr. Arafat.
NEWS
February 4, 2000
Sister Madonna Kolbenschlag, 64, an author and former House of Representatives policy analyst, died Saturday of a stroke in Santiago, Chile. She was 64. She taught American studies and women's studies at the University of Notre Dame in the 1980s, and was a legislative aide and research consultant in the U.S. House. She also was involved in human rights investigations in Central America. Thomas Joseph Peterson, 102, the oldest member of the Nez Perce tribe, died Sunday in Tacoma, Wash.
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