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NEWS
March 6, 1991
Citizens will have an opportunity to give input into a county miningplan at two public hearings next week.The county Mineral Mining Committee will sponsor the hearings to hear residents' concerns aboutestablished and planned mining operations in the county.The hearings are:* Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in the cafeteria at Francis Scott Key High School on Bark Hill Road in Union Town.* Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. at the Eldersburg branch of the Carroll County Public Library, 6400 W. Hemlock Drive.The mining committee is madeup of 10 citizens who are working with county planning department staff to write a comprehensive plan for handling the county's mineral resources.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
The photos of author Robert Timberg in recent years aren't as horrifying as his memoir leads readers to expect. His eyes are direct and unflinching, and his mouth expresses wry amusement. He has the kind of wrinkles normally found on a 74-year-old man and a patch of skin across his nose that at a casual glance appears sunburned. There's nothing about Timberg's appearance now that could be described as freakish, nothing that would cause young children to howl in fright. It's taken Timberg more than 35 operations - including one without anesthesia - and 47 years to achieve that face, and he's still not entirely reconciled to it. There are moments even now when he looks in the mirror and is first startled, then furious.
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NEWS
July 28, 1991
The County Commissioners continued negotiations with attorneys for acitizens environmental coalition and Lehigh Portland Cement Co. on abond agreement establishing conditions for mining near New Windsor.The discussion centered on a provision in the document, called an indenture, advising Lehigh that the county is reviewing its master plan for development, which could result in zoning changes that restrict or prohibit mining on property owned by Lehigh.Lehigh's attorney, William Dulany, argued that the clause was unfair because it applies only to Lehigh even though there are other mining companies either doing business in the county or considering opening a quarry here.
NEWS
By Gary Sullivan | August 27, 2014
Countless sailors, soldiers, airmen and Marines, along with civilian specialists, have passed through the heavily guarded gates of the National Security Agency just down the pike from Baltimore in the world's safest suburb - Fort Meade. I served in the Naval Security Group back in the seventies, when NSA stood for "No Such Agency. " The Cold War. The good old days. Moral clarity. Secrets generally stayed secret, give or take an occasional heart-stopping front page article in the New York Times.
NEWS
March 11, 1992
A Carroll delegate and a New Windsor citizen activist who fought to gain legal protections for residents against mining damages say they are disappointed in a court ruling temporarily suspending the law.The president of the Maryland Aggregates Association Inc., representing about 30 mining companies -- including two that operate quarries in Carroll -- said he was "very pleased" with the decision.An Anne Arundel County circuit judge on Monday suspended enforcement of the state law that presumes quarry companies liable for water supply damages within a "zone of influence" around their operations.
NEWS
March 6, 1991
Residents near a proposed quarry pit here told members of the county's Mineral Mining Committee their concerns and problems Monday.The committee and county planners toured the area surrounding a pit proposed by Lehigh Portland Cement Co.Carol Collins, who lives on Hallowell Lane, let the group stand in her backyard and look out to the farm field that Lehigh has plans to mine.Collins said her family moved to the home 1 1/2 years ago to get away from congestion in Olney, Montgomery County. She said shewasn't told the fields in her view were owned by Lehigh.
NEWS
April 1, 1992
An Anne Arundel Circuit Court judge has turned down the state's effort to dismiss a legal challenge from mining companies to a 1991 Maryland law intended to protect residents from damages.Two mining companies operating in Carroll, Lehigh Portland Cement Co. and Genstar Stone Products Co., are among nine plaintiffs included in the MarylandAggregates Association's lawsuit. A third, the Arundel Corp., has plans to locate a quarry in Carroll. Lehigh and Genstar both plan to expand.Carroll Del. Richard N. Dixon, a Democrat, carried the law through the legislature.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | February 17, 1993
ANNAPOLIS -- Carroll Del. Richard N. Dixon said yesterday he couldn't explain how two groups that had fought so hard in the past several years had reached an agreement."
NEWS
March 17, 1994
The Maryland Aggregates Association Inc. will appeal last week's decision by an Anne Arundel Circuit judge to uphold a 1991 law intended to protect residents in four counties from property damage caused by mining operations.Association president Samuel W. Christine said his board of directors met yesterday and decided to file an appeal.The judge's ruling was a victory for the state and for property owners in Baltimore, Carroll, Frederick and Washington counties, who battled for about four years to get the bill passed.
NEWS
September 14, 1993
Carroll commissioners are considering a change to the county mining ordinance that would increase the distance mining operations must be from homes in the agriculture zone.Yesterday, the commissioners heard from a Westminster resident who proposed the change and from representatives of two mining companies that would be affected.No decision was made on the proposal.Richard H. Offutt Jr., who lives in Wakefield Valley and is a member of the New Windsor Community Action Project, said the ordinance allows mining companies to build pits too close to homes in the agriculture zone.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | June 10, 2013
The U.S. government is trying "to create a database of every [phone] call ever made. " That's how one informed person described the National Security Agency's effort to USA Today. That newspaper also confirmed that not only is the government collecting every phone record from Verizon -- as first reported by the British newspaper The Guardian -- but it's also collecting similar data from other phone companies. It's important to emphasize that the NSA isn't listening to the content of these calls.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 30, 2013
As the end of my son's first year in middle school approaches, I look back in amazement at how much he has changed. Physically he is much taller and slimmer. Emotionally, his moods swing from silly to serious. One moment he wants a hug and the next he wants to be left alone. Over these last few months, I've seen him trying to figure out who he is and where he fits in with his peers. The most dramatic example of this is his wardrobe. This year he has vacillated from preppy, with button down polo shirts, to gangsta, with his hat turned sideways and his pants falling down, to skater dude, with graphic tees and hat worn backwards.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2013
Talk about tumbling down the rabbit hole. Jessica Anya Blau is the Baltimore author who memorably mined her experience growing up in a freewheeling bohemian family in her first two novels, "The Year of Naked Swim Parties" and "Drinking Closer to Home. " "Swim Party," in particular, made a splash, ending up on a couple of national "best of" lists. In her third novel, "The Wonder Bread Summer," which is being released Tuesday, Blau explores the Southern California counterculture of the 1980s through the eyes of 20-year-old Allie Dodgson.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Owning a perfect record can be a double-edged sword. There's the excitement and attention that results from staying unblemished, but there's also the knowledge that opponents are eager to end the run. Both Stevenson and Cornell fell from the ranks of the unbeaten Tuesday. The No. 2 Mustangs dropped a 7-6 decision to No. 9 Tufts and the No. 2 Big Red were nipped, 9-8, by No. 20 Bucknell. Those setbacks are reminders of what awaits 6-0 Washington College as it prepares to dive into the Centennial Conference portion of its regular-season schedule.
EXPLORE
February 13, 2013
An article in the Feb. 15, 1913, edition of The Argus reported on the culmination of a long-distance romance sparked by a meeting during a tour of Canadian gold mines. Three thousand miles across the continent to Tacoma, Wash., Miss Ethel Patterson, of Ingleside avenue, will travel to wed Donald McCallun, of Keremeos, B.C., and the Patterson home is now in the throes of preparation for her westward trip. Miss Patterson will leave Baltimore next Thursday, and will be accompanied on her long trip by her brother, Frederick V. Patterson , who will act as best man at the wedding.
EXPLORE
By Gwendolyn Glenn | December 14, 2012
"Claudie Hukill," on stage at Venus Theatre on C Street through Dec. 23, is a play about a poor family, struggling to survive hard economic times and personal tragedies in a West Virginia mining town. Set in 1972, the play is filled with generational, environmental, social, moral and class conflicts, centered around the main character and the play's namesake, Claudie Hukill. Although Claudie, a coal miner and town hero, is never seen, his presence is felt throughout the play as the drama surrounding his disappearance unfolds and escalates to a powerful ending.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | January 12, 1992
County Planning and Zoning Commission members hashed out revisions Friday to a proposed mining plan that has brought an outcry from many Wakefield Valley residents.The commission, which must approve theplan before it is sent to the Board of County Commissioners, met fora work session with planning staff and members of the citizens committee who helped write the plan.The plan will dictate where mining may occur in the county. Residents are worried about decreased property values, noise, and truck traffic.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | March 3, 1991
Birds perched on the jagged edges of the quarry flew up and out as the first horn sounded. After the third horn, the explosives planted in holes in a quarry wall were detonated. A loud boom was followed by a huge dust cloud that mushroomed up as 5,800 tons of limestone crashed from the wall to the floor of the pit.The county's mineral mining committee stood on the edge of the quarry, about 600 feet away from the blast. The explosion was over in a few seconds, and committee members reboarded a school bus, which took them 200 feet down steep ramps into the Genstar Stone Products Co. quarry.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | November 5, 2012
There's hardly a square inch of the 1,900-acre Soldiers Delight Natural Environmental Area that Johnny Johnsson hasn't walked, mapped or studied. That includes the scant remnants of several 19th-century chromium mines at Soldiers Delight in Owings Mills. Some of these mines once reached as deep as 200 feet beneath this chromium-bearing geological anomaly, known as a "serpentine barren. " Johnsson, a Finksburg resident who is an environmental engineer by profession - and a mining historian by avocation - has been a volunteer ranger and tour guide at Soldiers Delight, which is part of the Patapsco Valley State Park system, since 1990.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
U.S. counterterrorism efforts monitor and sort vast databases of information for clues on potential plots. Now a team of University of Maryland researchers have used data-mining techniques employed by online giants like Google and Amazon.com to aid in the fight against terror. In the same way corporate America uses algorithms to predict what consumers are most likely to buy or what ads they might click, the researchers analyzed two decades of data on Pakistani terrorist group Lashkar-e-Taiba.
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