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NEWS
By Jim Florio | January 26, 1995
New Brunswick, N.J. -- THE HARD edge of the new congressional leadership's "Contract With America" is slowly being unveiled for all to see.For example, it wasn't sufficient for Rep. Dick Armey, a Texas Republican and the House majority leader, to merely state his opposition to an increase in the minimum wage from the current $4.25 to $5 per hour.Rather, he felt the need to declare war on any such initiative, proclaiming that he'd oppose it "with every fiber of [his] being."Then, revealing his scorched-earth strategy, Mr. Armey expressed his opposition to the very concept of a minimum wage.
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NEWS
By Charly Carter | August 7, 2014
Diners rejoice! Baltimore City is celebrating its summer Restaurant Week through Aug. 10, and Baltimore County restaurants kick off their celebration Friday. The events offer a great way to discover new places and fresh tastes or revisit old favorites at a discount. But while you're enjoying your meal, consider the servers and restaurant staff who make the dining experience. During the last Maryland General Assembly session, workers who rely on tips for salary were dealt a harsh blow when legislators permanently froze their pay at $3.63 per hour.
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NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- As Republican leaders grudgingly moved toward consideration of a minimum-wage increase yesterday, Vice President Al Gore predicted that Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole "will cave to pressure" and agree to an increase sought by Democrats."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley joined U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas E. Perez at a popular burrito restaurant in this Washington suburb Thursday to praise its higher-than-minimum wages and to call for a pay raise for other American workers. The event at Boloco gave O'Malley an opportunity to lend public support to a top priority of President Obama at a time when the governor has been at odds with the administration over how to shelter immigrant children from Central America. Appearing with Perez, Montgomery County Executive Isiah "Ike" Leggett and Boloco chief executive Patrick Renna, O'Malley said the 22-restaurant chain does well by treating its employees well.
NEWS
August 4, 2008
Maryland's minimum-wage law became moot last month when the federal minimum wage rose to $6.55 an hour, or 40 cents higher than what the state required. Next summer, the state minimum-wage law sinks further underwater when the federal wage rises to $7.25. Between now and January, when the next General Assembly session convenes, Gov. Martin O'Malley needs to formulate a plan to revive the state minimum wage to a realistic standard. The potential benefits of such a law on the lives of Maryland's working-class citizens - and on our most impoverished communities - are too great to ignore.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 30, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Under pressure from the White House, Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich said yesterday that he would delay until next year his plans to recommend a higher minimum wage.Two weeks ago, Mr. Reich said that by the end of October he would recommend that the minimum wage, now $4.25 an hour, be increased by about 25 cents. But White House officials warned him immediately afterward that such a move would be unwise because it could antagonize business leaders at a time when President Clinton needs them for his health care and trade proposals.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | February 13, 1991
In the midst of a recession, surrounded by drastic discounts, inventory reduction sales and vacant storefronts, scores of area retailers are begging for more help.At the Hunt Valley Mall alone last week, 17 stores displayed window signs appealing for job applicants.There were at least 10 stores posting signs at the Annapolis Mall, three at Reisterstown Road Plaza, two at the Glen Burnie Mall and even one at the Mondawmin Mall in economically hard-pressed West Baltimore.Some stores are enticing applicants with a selection of work schedules and generous employee discounts.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2005
Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., In what promises to be a bruising political fight, state Democrats and worker advocates fired the opening salvos yesterday in their push to raise Maryland's minimum wage. It's now linked to the federal rate of $5.15 an hour, which was last increased in 1997. More than a dozen state legislators are sponsoring bills calling for $6.15 an hour, while a third bill, in the House, proposes $7 an hour. "It's a crisis situation," said Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., the lead sponsor of the Senate bill.
NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA and JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTER | January 18, 2006
Maryland's minimum-wage earners will see a $1 raise in their hourly pay after the state Senate yesterday overturned Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s veto of a bill that bumps the rate to $6.15. The law, which goes into effect in 30 days, makes Maryland the 18th state to increase the minimum wage over the federal minimum of $5.15. The Senate voted 30-17 yesterday to override, after a 91-48 vote by the House last week. "I think it sends the right message that the state of Maryland cares about its working families," said Sen. Thomas M. Middleton, a Charles County Democrat.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 25, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Working at $4.25 an hour for a company that cleans public schools in Baltimore, Keith Mahone is puzzled that there should be argument over President Clinton's proposal to raise the minimum wage."
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
After months of negotiations, one strike and the threat of another, and intervention from the governor, Johns Hopkins Hospital and 2,000 service workers reached a tentative labor agreement early Tuesday that some said could become an "important benchmark" for the health care industry. The deal, which is to be submitted to the workers for a vote, came after seven hours of negotiations that ended at 2 a.m. It would affect housekeepers, cooks, janitors, surgical technicians and others.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Juggling the rising cost of textbooks, tuition, food and rent is a little more manageable now for rising University of Maryland, Baltimore County senior Keyerra Jeter, thanks to a June 1 raise in starting pay to $9 per hour for Gap Inc.'s 65,000 employees. "It was difficult, with everything being so expensive all the time, to budget for everything on a minimum-wage salary," said Jeter, an employee of the Old Navy in Waugh Chapel. "I'm just thankful the increase has let me better meet the needs that I have.
NEWS
Peter Morici | July 1, 2014
Economists should be bound by facts and reason. I simply can't embrace liberal positions on the minimum wage, climate change and gender discrimination, and call myself a scientist. Let's take them one by one: The minimum wage: The Congressional Budget Office estimates that raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, as President Obama proposes, would eliminate 500,000 to 1,000,000 jobs. Businesses will be forced to raise prices, thereby reducing purchases (If beef or a plumber's visit gets too high, folks eat more chicken and fix their own faucets)
NEWS
June 29, 2014
Congratulations to The Sun for its balanced reporting of the many complexities of the subminimum wage issue and its acknowledgment that a phase-out needs to be gradual so that no individual loses opportunity or earnings ("'Subminimum wage' for disabled workers called exploitative," June 14). The Arc Baltimore, whose mission is, in part, is to expand and diversify employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, is encouraged at the progress we've seen for those in jobs earning at or above minimum wage and at companies that are in the community, not in segregated workshops.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | June 25, 2014
A few weeks ago I was visited in my office by the chairman of one of the country's biggest high-tech firms. He wanted to talk about the causes and consequences of widening inequality and the shrinking middle class, and what to do about it. I asked him why he was concerned. "Because the American middle class is the core of our customer base," he said. "If they can't afford our products in the years ahead, we're in deep trouble. " I'm hearing the same refrain these days from a growing number of business leaders.
NEWS
June 22, 2014
In one of the most consequential matters considered by the Maryland General Assembly this year, lawmakers approved a bill sponsored by Gov. Martin O'Malley to raise the state's minimum wage from $7.25 an hour to $10.10 an hour. Though the final measure was substantially weaker than the governor's initial proposal - its implementation was pushed back by two years to the summer of 2018, for example, and it contains no automatic adjustment for inflation - it at least recognized that the present standard is wholly inadequate to keep low-wage workers out of poverty or do much to stimulate the economy with their spending power.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | December 27, 2005
WASHINGTON -- New Year's Day will bring the ninth straight year in which the federal minimum wage has remained frozen at $5.15 an hour, marking the second-longest period that the nation has had a stagnant minimum wage since the standard was established in 1938. Against that backdrop, Democrats are preparing ballot initiatives in states across the country to boost turnout of Democratic-leaning voters in 2006. Labor, religious and community groups have launched efforts to place minimum-wage initiatives on ballots in Ohio, Michigan, Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, Arkansas and Montana next fall.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2006
Last week Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley sent a letter to Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. asking him to support a minimum-wage increase - and then immediately told the press about it. It was a textbook dare, straight out of the Democratic handbook for this election season. Many Democrats across the nation are convinced that George Bush was elected President in 2004 thanks to a single wedge issue: gay marriage. They believe ballot initiatives aimed at banning gay marriage in several states drew large numbers of social conservatives to the polls.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | June 18, 2014
Rather than confront poverty by extending jobless benefits to the long-term unemployed, endorsing a higher minimum wage or supporting jobs programs, conservative Republicans are taking a different tack. They're peddling three big lies about poverty. To wit: Lie No. 1: Economic growth reduces poverty. "The best anti-poverty program," wrote Paul Ryan, the House Budget Committee chairman, in the Wall Street Journal, "is economic growth. " Wrong. Since the late 1970s, the economy has grown 147 percent per capita but almost nothing has trickled down.
NEWS
June 18, 2014
As a recent high school graduate preparing to cast his first vote, I have been pondering whom I will support in this year's gubernatorial election. The governor is the state's highest ranking official and has a broad range of powers. Based on the powers provided to the governor by our state's constitution, the role has been hailed as one of the most powerful in the nation. I would like to know the person who receives my vote will be effective, fulfill their campaign promises and understand policies and procedures.
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