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By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2011
In the two decades that Baltimore's Phillips Foods has been importing crabmeat from Asia, fishermen in countries such as Indonesia have had to work harder for each catch and their harvests have yielded increasingly smaller blue swimming crabs. Now Phillips and other major U.S. crab importers, all competitors, are joining forces to reverse the trend that they played a major part in causing. The importers say they're taking steps to protect the future of what has become a key global fishery and prevent the type of overfishing that led to declines in Chesapeake Bay blue crabs.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2011
In the two decades that Baltimore's Phillips Foods has been importing crabmeat from Asia, fishermen in countries such as Indonesia have had to work harder for each catch and their harvests have yielded increasingly smaller blue swimming crabs. Now Phillips and other major U.S. crab importers, all competitors, are joining forces to reverse the trend that they played a major part in causing. The importers say they're taking steps to protect the future of what has become a key global fishery and prevent the type of overfishing that led to declines in Chesapeake Bay blue crabs.
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SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1998
Maryland proposes to open its recreational and charter-boat rockfish seasons April 24 with a minimum size limit of 28 inches, Department of Natural Resources officials said last week.Under proposals submitted to and approved by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, the state's first season would run through June 14, with a creel limit of one per day. The 28-inch minimum size is four inches less than last year's limit for the spring season."By dropping the size limits, we hope to greatly reduce hooking mortality," said Dr. Bob Bachman, director of DNR's Fisheries Service.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMAS | March 5, 2006
How close is spring? By the calendar, two weeks. But for those of us desperate to reclaim the water and woods from winter's bite, there are other stirrings in the atmosphere that point to spring. One of the earliest indicators kicked in Wednesday with the opening of Liberty and Prettyboy reservoirs to boat fishermen. The plane that brought me home from the Olympics last week flew right over both reservoirs at about 10,000 feet. Even at that height, I swear I saw a bobbing boat or two, probably eager anglers checking out their favorite spots.
NEWS
By Capt.Bob Spore | January 18, 1991
Mustering enthusiasm about yellow perch is difficult as CNN issues live reports on the bombing of Baghdad. I will, however, leave the warin the hands of President Bush and the Almighty and turn to more local issues.Yellow perch fishing at one time signaled the beginningof the fishing season. These fish are among the first of the speciesto spawn each year. As the fish congregate before and during spawning, so did anglers congregate to chase them.Yellow perch stocks plummeted in many areas and grew in others.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1996
Regulations for recreational and commercial rockfish seasons still are being discussed, but Pete Jensen, head of tidewater fisheries for the Department of Natural Resources, said yesterday that the spring and early summer seasons will be almost the same as last year."
NEWS
January 15, 1999
THE LATEST studies indicate the Chesapeake's blue crab population is in clear decline. Unfortunately, we've heard the same woeful assessments for years.Maryland imposed new limits on crabbing three years ago, cutting permitted fishing times and catches. The results were mixed: a spurt in the crab catch one season, a drop the next.Logically, the emphasis on curbing overfishing should have yielded an increase in crab numbers, given their short life span of two to four years. But commercial watermen have increased their efforts, within the rules, to take more of the shellfish.
NEWS
By Capt. Bob Spore | February 17, 1991
Could it be? Rockfish in the spring!Although not set in stone, conditions are more than just favorable for Maryland recreational fishermen to catch a trophy rockfish this spring --possibly even a record.Monday evening, the state Department of Natural Resources presented a preliminary proposal to the Striped Bass Advisory Board that would open a very conservative spring striped bass fishery.The advisory board chewed on the proposal, tried it on two or three different ways, and in the end, passed a modified version by an 8-2 vote.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2001
RICHMOND, Va. -- Maryland's sweeping proposed crab-harvest restrictions came under sharp attack here yesterday as a multistate panel met to weigh new efforts to restore the Chesapeake Bay's dwindling stocks of the crustaceans. J.C. Tolley, owner of Meredith and Meredith Seafood in Toddville, warned the Bi-State Blue Crab Advisory Committee the regulations would be the death knell for Maryland's crab industry and that he would close his business if they go into effect. David Corbin, a Smith Island crab scraper, said the proposed increase in minimum sizes of soft and peeler crabs would "be devastating" to him and the few remaining scrapers in Maryland's portion of the Chesapeake.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | January 25, 2004
Here we go again. It's time to play that popular angler game show, "How Big is My Flounder?" That's right, officials at the Department of Natural Resources are asking folks in the studio audience what they'd like in a summer flounder season this year. Behind Door No. 1 is a 16.5-inch minimum size, eight-fish-per-person daily creel limit, with no closed season. Behind Door No. 2 is a 16-inch minimum size, three-fish daily creel, with no closed season. Behind Door No. 3 is a 15.5-inch minimum size, two-fish daily creel, with no closed season.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | March 13, 2005
HERE'S A LITTLE news to help push winter off the calendar. The state has relaxed its summer flounder regulations for this season to give both Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean anglers a chance for keepers. On Thursday afternoon, after considering the public's reactions to four size and creel options, Department of Natural Resources biologists decided to lower the minimum size for Chesapeake Bay keepers to 15 inches, with a creel limit of two fish. For ocean and coastal bays, the minimum size has been set at 15 1/2 inches, with a creel limit of four fish.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | January 25, 2004
Here we go again. It's time to play that popular angler game show, "How Big is My Flounder?" That's right, officials at the Department of Natural Resources are asking folks in the studio audience what they'd like in a summer flounder season this year. Behind Door No. 1 is a 16.5-inch minimum size, eight-fish-per-person daily creel limit, with no closed season. Behind Door No. 2 is a 16-inch minimum size, three-fish daily creel, with no closed season. Behind Door No. 3 is a 15.5-inch minimum size, two-fish daily creel, with no closed season.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 14, 2002
Just about any county in any state has one. A golden stretch of real estate where each new development brings high prices and attracts high-profile buyers. In Baltimore County, this undisputed area of prime real estate is known simply as the Falls Road corridor. This six-mile stretch begins just north of the Baltimore Beltway and ends at Shawan Road. The section has for almost 30 years been home to some of the most desirable housing developments in the metropolitan area, while commanding some of the highest new-home prices on the market.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2002
Maryland authorities were set to announce tough new restrictions today on the harvest of blue crabs during the coming season. But, as part of a series of compromises with the crabmeat industry, the state has backed away from a proposed limit on importing out-of-state crabs that business owners contended would ruin them. The new regulations, which take effect April 1, will increase the minimum sizes for male hard crabs, soft-shell crabs and "peelers" that can be caught legally by commercial and recreational crabbers.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2001
RICHMOND, Va. -- Maryland's sweeping proposed crab-harvest restrictions came under sharp attack here yesterday as a multistate panel met to weigh new efforts to restore the Chesapeake Bay's dwindling stocks of the crustaceans. J.C. Tolley, owner of Meredith and Meredith Seafood in Toddville, warned the Bi-State Blue Crab Advisory Committee the regulations would be the death knell for Maryland's crab industry and that he would close his business if they go into effect. David Corbin, a Smith Island crab scraper, said the proposed increase in minimum sizes of soft and peeler crabs would "be devastating" to him and the few remaining scrapers in Maryland's portion of the Chesapeake.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1999
LA PLATA -- Aiming to ease Charles County's growing pains by building more upscale housing, local officials are considering an unprecedented size requirement for new homes -- a move that is drawing fire from developers and community activists.The commissioners of the rapidly growing Southern Maryland county have proposed requiring that detached, single-family homes have at least 1,650 square feet of floor space if they are to be built in the northern fifth of the county, which is designated for development.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | March 13, 2005
HERE'S A LITTLE news to help push winter off the calendar. The state has relaxed its summer flounder regulations for this season to give both Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean anglers a chance for keepers. On Thursday afternoon, after considering the public's reactions to four size and creel options, Department of Natural Resources biologists decided to lower the minimum size for Chesapeake Bay keepers to 15 inches, with a creel limit of two fish. For ocean and coastal bays, the minimum size has been set at 15 1/2 inches, with a creel limit of four fish.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1998
The spring rockfish season opens tomorrow, with the possibility of excellent -- and perhaps protracted -- bay fishing for striped bass from Brewerton Channel to the Virginia line.According to reports from Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Service biologists, the peak of the annual rockfish spawn has yet to occur in the tributaries and reaches of the upper Chesapeake, which bodes well for Baltimore-area anglers.The minimum length for rockfish through June 14 is 28 inches, with a creel limit of one per day, and Fisheries Service biologist Martin L. Gary expects the early days of the spring season to produce good numbers of stripers well in excess of that length.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1999
In hopes of improving the appearance of the planned community of Honeygo, the Baltimore County Council is considering a move to limit the size of the development yet again, this time looking to cut 250 to 500 homes from the project.The proposal would expand the minimum size of lots as a way to limit housing density, reducing the number of homes by 5 percent to 10 percent. It also would add other design restrictions. Those moves, developers and officials say, would help drive up prices in a community where the average price of a single-family home is $270,000.
NEWS
January 15, 1999
THE LATEST studies indicate the Chesapeake's blue crab population is in clear decline. Unfortunately, we've heard the same woeful assessments for years.Maryland imposed new limits on crabbing three years ago, cutting permitted fishing times and catches. The results were mixed: a spurt in the crab catch one season, a drop the next.Logically, the emphasis on curbing overfishing should have yielded an increase in crab numbers, given their short life span of two to four years. But commercial watermen have increased their efforts, within the rules, to take more of the shellfish.
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