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By J.D. Considine | December 8, 1998
CDR (Compact Disc Recordable) and CDRW (rewritable CDR) aren't the only digital recording platforms out there. Sony has been doggedly promoting its MiniDisc (MD) for several years now, pegging it as the digital replacement for the cassette.MDs are about the size of a computer floppy disc, are read with a laser and use the same "burn" technology for recording as CDR machines.Although the sound quality isn't quite as high as CDs, the ruggedness of Walkman-size MD players has earned the format a small but growing market, particularly among active young people.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James | October 3, 2002
If you've been too intimidated to take the plunge into the MP3 computer music scene, then Sony's MiniDisc Net MD MZ-N707 player might be a good alternative. What's a minidisc, you say? Well, it's less than half the size of a regular compact disc and costs about $2. Not bad, considering that you can compress about five hours (roughly five full-length albums) on one 80-minute disc. What makes it happen is Sony's Net MD compression technology, which, like MP3, extracts audio from a compact disc and compresses it into a digital music file by filtering out sound elements that the human ear can't hear.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James | October 3, 2002
If you've been too intimidated to take the plunge into the MP3 computer music scene, then Sony's MiniDisc Net MD MZ-N707 player might be a good alternative. What's a minidisc, you say? Well, it's less than half the size of a regular compact disc and costs about $2. Not bad, considering that you can compress about five hours (roughly five full-length albums) on one 80-minute disc. What makes it happen is Sony's Net MD compression technology, which, like MP3, extracts audio from a compact disc and compresses it into a digital music file by filtering out sound elements that the human ear can't hear.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2001
When is something old suddenly new again? When you talk about MiniDisc technology. Introduced in the fall of 1992 to yawns from the American public, the MiniDisc player has seen a renaissance in the last year, thanks to versatile new, portable models that record and play back music, lectures, concerts and interviews. Essentially a miniature compact disc in a case, the MiniDisc looks much like a regular PC floppy disk. While a few home audio components and car stereos are designed to handle MiniDiscs, the popular sellers are portable player/recorders about half the size of a paperback novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sean Gallagher and Sean Gallagher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 14, 1998
On a recent cross-country flight, I threw a pile of my favorite CDs into a travel bag along with a portable CD player. As I tried to gently place a disc into the player while balancing my complimentary peanuts, the disc and its jewel case fell onto the floor. Twisting and ducking, I grabbed the disc before it was stepped on - but the jewel case was crushed by the flight attendant's snack cart.These are the hazards of the traveling music lover. You either carry a stack of CDs and put them in harm's way - and deal with the jumps as you go over bumps - or record your favorite tracks onto audio cassette tapes and put up with static and a locked-down soundtrack.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 5, 1999
After spending the better part of an evening compiling a mix tape for your car, it's time to see if these songs suit your morning commute. So you rev up the engine, crank the car stereo, and head for the highway.Everything seems fine at first. In fact, it's so good to have new tunes in the car that you're almost glad to be going to work.Until the fifth song in the mix comes on, that is. Hearing it, you realize you've made a terrible mistake. It's got the wrong mood, the wrong groove, the wrong everything.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1998
MiniDisc is portable, lets listener arrange music tracksWhen the MiniDisc hit the market several years back, it landed with a big thud. A new generation of MiniDisc player/recorders has entered the ring for Round Two, bolstered by better compression software and cheaper recordable media.Sharp's MD-MS702 MiniDisc player-recorder ($399) offers undeniable compactness and convenience. The small size (3 inches by 1 inches by 3 inches) and light weight (less than 8 ounces) means that it's equally at home in your pocket or plugged into your home stereo.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2000
Sony CD player puts 21st-century features in a portable package Staring at Sony's new D-EJ915 CD Walkman ($250), it's hard not to exclaim: "How on Earth did they do that?!" This impressive portable CD player manages to cram the drive mechanism, the electronics and two rechargeable batteries into a space not much thicker than a short stack of CDs. Besides the impressive hardware compression, the D-EJ915 offers other 21st-century features. It has a backlighted electro-luminescent LCD remote with all the controls found on the player.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1999
Last year, when we got a load of Brenthaven's roomy Expandable Topload carrying case, we were impressed by its portability, high style, and laptop protection (rated by Mobile Computing as the best in the business). Brenthaven has done it again with its latest, the $295 UrbanBackpack.The idea for the UrbanBackpack was to provide a serious business bag that can easily make the transition from corporate to casual. The boxy (13.5 inches by 15.5 inches by 10 inches), 4.7-pound nylon bag can be carried in three ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2001
When is something old suddenly new again? When you talk about MiniDisc technology. Introduced in the fall of 1992 to yawns from the American public, the MiniDisc player has seen a renaissance in the last year, thanks to versatile new, portable models that record and play back music, lectures, concerts and interviews. Essentially a miniature compact disc in a case, the MiniDisc looks much like a regular PC floppy disk. While a few home audio components and car stereos are designed to handle MiniDiscs, the popular sellers are portable player/recorders about half the size of a paperback novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2000
Sony CD player puts 21st-century features in a portable package Staring at Sony's new D-EJ915 CD Walkman ($250), it's hard not to exclaim: "How on Earth did they do that?!" This impressive portable CD player manages to cram the drive mechanism, the electronics and two rechargeable batteries into a space not much thicker than a short stack of CDs. Besides the impressive hardware compression, the D-EJ915 offers other 21st-century features. It has a backlighted electro-luminescent LCD remote with all the controls found on the player.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1999
Last year, when we got a load of Brenthaven's roomy Expandable Topload carrying case, we were impressed by its portability, high style, and laptop protection (rated by Mobile Computing as the best in the business). Brenthaven has done it again with its latest, the $295 UrbanBackpack.The idea for the UrbanBackpack was to provide a serious business bag that can easily make the transition from corporate to casual. The boxy (13.5 inches by 15.5 inches by 10 inches), 4.7-pound nylon bag can be carried in three ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 5, 1999
After spending the better part of an evening compiling a mix tape for your car, it's time to see if these songs suit your morning commute. So you rev up the engine, crank the car stereo, and head for the highway.Everything seems fine at first. In fact, it's so good to have new tunes in the car that you're almost glad to be going to work.Until the fifth song in the mix comes on, that is. Hearing it, you realize you've made a terrible mistake. It's got the wrong mood, the wrong groove, the wrong everything.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine | December 8, 1998
CDR (Compact Disc Recordable) and CDRW (rewritable CDR) aren't the only digital recording platforms out there. Sony has been doggedly promoting its MiniDisc (MD) for several years now, pegging it as the digital replacement for the cassette.MDs are about the size of a computer floppy disc, are read with a laser and use the same "burn" technology for recording as CDR machines.Although the sound quality isn't quite as high as CDs, the ruggedness of Walkman-size MD players has earned the format a small but growing market, particularly among active young people.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1998
MiniDisc is portable, lets listener arrange music tracksWhen the MiniDisc hit the market several years back, it landed with a big thud. A new generation of MiniDisc player/recorders has entered the ring for Round Two, bolstered by better compression software and cheaper recordable media.Sharp's MD-MS702 MiniDisc player-recorder ($399) offers undeniable compactness and convenience. The small size (3 inches by 1 inches by 3 inches) and light weight (less than 8 ounces) means that it's equally at home in your pocket or plugged into your home stereo.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sean Gallagher and Sean Gallagher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 14, 1998
On a recent cross-country flight, I threw a pile of my favorite CDs into a travel bag along with a portable CD player. As I tried to gently place a disc into the player while balancing my complimentary peanuts, the disc and its jewel case fell onto the floor. Twisting and ducking, I grabbed the disc before it was stepped on - but the jewel case was crushed by the flight attendant's snack cart.These are the hazards of the traveling music lover. You either carry a stack of CDs and put them in harm's way - and deal with the jumps as you go over bumps - or record your favorite tracks onto audio cassette tapes and put up with static and a locked-down soundtrack.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 29, 1992
So you've finally given in to CDs, despite the comparatively high cost and audiophile gripes about their supposedly cold, clinical sound.Well, time to readjust your mind set again. Two new digital-format acronyms are vying for attention: DCC and MD.Unlike compact discs, both the digital compact cassette and the MiniDisc let you make handy, portable copies of music. And unlike with conventional tape, some experts say the copies sound as good as the originals.A lot of electronics-industry talk has it that the arrival of the two formats signals a battle royal, in which only one of the two will survive.
BUSINESS
By STEVE AUERWECK and STEVE AUERWECK,STAFF WRITER | July 19, 1993
A White Marsh company that provides encryption equipment was misidentified in The Sun's Business section Monday. The company's name is Information Resource Engineering Inc.The Sun regrets the errors.Novell developing data security systemsNovell Inc. is leading a cluster of companies in developing systems that will provide greater security for data on computer networks.Provo, Utah-based Novell, with its NetWare line, is the dominant company in PC networking. But lately it's been feeling the hot breath of Microsoft Corp.
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