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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | September 25, 1994
Bet you didn't know the fountain of youth was a mere 100 miles from Baltimore, tucked away in West Virginia's panhandle.That's what the region's early Native Americans thought, anyway. And while most people have dismissed the notion that a pool of water can make you perpetually young, plenty of folks still count on the warm mineral waters of Berkeley Springs, W.Va., to erase life's aches and pains -- if only for a few hours.Berkeley Springs is more than warm water, although for some, that's enough.
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By DAVID FILIPOV and DAVID FILIPOV,BOSTON GLOBE | April 2, 2006
DEAD SEA, JORDAN / / It's high noon at the lowest point on Earth. A French couple are bobbing in the water effortlessly, holding hands and whispering sweet nothings. A German tourist is lying on the surface, reading his newspaper and sipping a bottle of mineral water. A Russian man is posing for his wife, sitting upright in 10 feet of water, his arms crossed on his chest, floating in the sea as if it were his personal, adjustable mattress. Swimming in the Dead Sea is as easy as lounging on a poolside chaise.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The federal government proposed yesterday more stringent standards for bottled-water labels, hoping to clarify for consumers the differences among mineral water, distilled water, spring water and others.Consumers are entitled to know the source of bottled water, as well as precisely what it contains, the Food and Drug Administration said in announcing the proposals, which become official Tuesday and are expected to become final in six months, following public comment. The actual changes in the labels would occur in about a year.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2000
CUMBERLAND - Over the past six years, Ella Snyder has used roughly 4,300 gallons of bottled mineral water. She has a working 105-foot well in her front lawn, but ever since the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency told her it was contaminated with hazardous waste, she's opted for the bottles. But Snyder and 18 neighboring households on a hillside east of Cumberland have returned to the world of safe tap water. This Allegany County community of mostly small houses and mobile homes was finally hooked up to the city water system, and for Snyder and her neighbors, it meant a transition few can appreciate.
BUSINESS
By Roger Cohen and Roger Cohen,New York Times News Service | March 25, 1992
PARIS -- After Europe's toughest international corporate battle in several years, the Swiss food giant Nestle won control yesterday of Perrier, gaining an important stake in the world's expanding and highly profitable mineral-water business.The Agnelli family of Italy, which battled Nestle for three months, gave up the fight as part of an accord under which the Swiss corporation, allied with the Indosuez bank, sweetened its offer for Source Perrier SA to $2.7 billion.The Agnelli group, which holds 39.9 percent of Perrier's principal holding company, Exor S.A., agreed to tender Exor's 35.5 percent stake in the mineral water company to Nestle.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 30, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Americans pay 200 to 1,000 times more fo bottled water than for tap water, even though they often come from the same source. The bottled version commands a high price because some people think it tastes better, and some think it is safer. The Food and Drug Administration now says they are entitled to know where it comes from.So the agency was expected to propose new rules today for bottled water. One will define terms like spring water, artesian water and mineral water and require that labels describe them truthfully.
FEATURES
By Leslie Weddell and Leslie Weddell,Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph | April 4, 1993
Winds of change are blowing across the water.Bottled water, that is.Along with the push for accuracy in food labeling comes a federal proposal for standard definitions of the various terms used on labels of bottled water.Americans pay 200 to 1,000 times more for bottled water than for tap water -- even though a quarter of all bottled water comes from the same source as tap water, and the Food and Drug Administration believes consumers are entitled to know what's in that water.The standardized definitions, which go into effect July 6, define such terms as "spring water," "artesian water" and "mineral water"; require that labels use the terms truthfully; and require that the quality of bottled water is at least as high as that of tap water.
FEATURES
By Susan Moon and Susan Moon,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | December 18, 1991
ASSEMBLING A GIFT basket is easier than you might think. Think up a theme that suits your recipient and browse the gourmet, gift and grocery stores for items that are both tasty and decorative.* If you cook and enjoy making food gifts, by all means incorporate them into the basket. Bake up your tastiest cookies or candies, package them in a shallow can and cover with clear plastic wrap. Include decorative napkins and sampler sizes of gourmet coffees and teas.* For those adventurous types on your list, try an ethnic food basket.
NEWS
April 15, 1991
IN THE WAKE of the discovery of a dangerous carcinogen in Perrier, the carbonated French spring water, congressional probers have zeroed in on the bottled-water business. What they have found, among other things, is a small company near Atlanta operating out of a house trailer that turns out "Designer Love Water," complete with instructions for use.The owner now says he doesn't even claim his product will quench thirst, but Capitol Hill investigators led by Michigan Rep. John Dingell say the owner is claiming much more.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2000
CUMBERLAND - Over the past six years, Ella Snyder has used roughly 4,300 gallons of bottled mineral water. She has a working 105-foot well in her front lawn, but ever since the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency told her it was contaminated with hazardous waste, she's opted for the bottles. But Snyder and 18 neighboring households on a hillside east of Cumberland have returned to the world of safe tap water. This Allegany County community of mostly small houses and mobile homes was finally hooked up to the city water system, and for Snyder and her neighbors, it meant a transition few can appreciate.
NEWS
By JEFF STEIN | September 7, 1997
One day after Pakistan rather sullenly marked its 50th anniversary last month, I was bumping along a stretch of broken concrete and dirt about 200 miles south of Islamabad, the capital. The Pakistani driver, who would eventually become my close friend after another 1,000 miles, turned to me with a question."You know," asked Ahmad, swerving around a crater that could have swallowed his little taxi, "how Pakistan was listed No. 2 in the world in corruption."Yeah, I said, I'd heard something about it. Pakistan had been ranked second only to Nigeria in a 1996 "global corruption index" by an outfit called Transparency International.
FEATURES
By Lynne Muller and Lynne Muller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 28, 1996
Spotlighting the surface of the crystalline pool with a bright patch of turquoise, sunshine pours through the circular roof of the women's bathhouse at Warm Springs, Va.A few bathers float in and out of sunshine and shadow as the sun's rays penetrate to the rocky bottom of the clear spring water. The bathhouse, which has stood here since 1826, is illuminated in soft green light.Next door is the 1761 men's bathhouse, the oldest spa structure in America.I soak up history along with iron, calcium and bicarbonates.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | September 25, 1994
Bet you didn't know the fountain of youth was a mere 100 miles from Baltimore, tucked away in West Virginia's panhandle.That's what the region's early Native Americans thought, anyway. And while most people have dismissed the notion that a pool of water can make you perpetually young, plenty of folks still count on the warm mineral waters of Berkeley Springs, W.Va., to erase life's aches and pains -- if only for a few hours.Berkeley Springs is more than warm water, although for some, that's enough.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | December 13, 1993
MOSCOW -- A merry threesome walked through the steadily falling wet snow to the school on Pisovaya Street yesterday, on their way to help determine Russia's future.About 11 a.m., Lena Ilingina had knocked on the door of her upstairs neighbors, Yura and Natasha Shlyakhtin, to ask if they wanted to vote.This was awesome business, a time to decide on a new constitution that President Boris N. Yeltsin had proclaimed could mean the difference between creating a new nation based on law (if the constitution was approved)
FEATURES
By Leslie Weddell and Leslie Weddell,Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph | April 4, 1993
Winds of change are blowing across the water.Bottled water, that is.Along with the push for accuracy in food labeling comes a federal proposal for standard definitions of the various terms used on labels of bottled water.Americans pay 200 to 1,000 times more for bottled water than for tap water -- even though a quarter of all bottled water comes from the same source as tap water, and the Food and Drug Administration believes consumers are entitled to know what's in that water.The standardized definitions, which go into effect July 6, define such terms as "spring water," "artesian water" and "mineral water"; require that labels use the terms truthfully; and require that the quality of bottled water is at least as high as that of tap water.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The federal government proposed yesterday more stringent standards for bottled-water labels, hoping to clarify for consumers the differences among mineral water, distilled water, spring water and others.Consumers are entitled to know the source of bottled water, as well as precisely what it contains, the Food and Drug Administration said in announcing the proposals, which become official Tuesday and are expected to become final in six months, following public comment. The actual changes in the labels would occur in about a year.
NEWS
By JEFF STEIN | September 7, 1997
One day after Pakistan rather sullenly marked its 50th anniversary last month, I was bumping along a stretch of broken concrete and dirt about 200 miles south of Islamabad, the capital. The Pakistani driver, who would eventually become my close friend after another 1,000 miles, turned to me with a question."You know," asked Ahmad, swerving around a crater that could have swallowed his little taxi, "how Pakistan was listed No. 2 in the world in corruption."Yeah, I said, I'd heard something about it. Pakistan had been ranked second only to Nigeria in a 1996 "global corruption index" by an outfit called Transparency International.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 30, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Americans pay 200 to 1,000 times more fo bottled water than for tap water, even though they often come from the same source. The bottled version commands a high price because some people think it tastes better, and some think it is safer. The Food and Drug Administration now says they are entitled to know where it comes from.So the agency was expected to propose new rules today for bottled water. One will define terms like spring water, artesian water and mineral water and require that labels describe them truthfully.
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